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Daphne du Maurier

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Mon May 4th, 2009, 9:44 am

I do like those covers.
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Mon May 4th, 2009, 12:53 pm

[quote=""Vanessa""]What lovely covers, Misfit! Are those three the only new covers released in your neck of the woods so far? My collection are the Virago Modern Classics.[/quote]

As far as I know those are the only new editions I've spotted on Amazon or on Amy's blog :o
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chuck
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Post by chuck » Mon May 4th, 2009, 3:32 pm

Misfit....check out EBay I'm almost positive a DVD of the 1952 "My Cousin Rachel" is available....low end pricing auctions are usually very reliable and safe...."Frenchman's Creek" should becoming out on DVD soon....Rumour has it been the classic movie channel....A few years ago the BBC did a remake of FC.....As I remember the 1944 film was not a swashbuckler, limited action, but good story, Fontaine is quite good and is visually stunning.....Me thinks du M started Barbra Cortland and other Bodice rippers on their way....never read her or them(maybe one or two Angeliques).....but they can't hold a candle/substance to Lady Daphne's works....really nice to see the Classic reads are making a strong come back.....

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Mon May 4th, 2009, 8:14 pm

Me thinks du M started Barbra Cortland and other Bodice rippers on their way....never read her or them(maybe one or two Angeliques).....but they can't hold a candle/substance to Lady Daphne's works....really nice to see the Classic reads are making a strong come back.....
I so agree, its just amazing to see the chemistry she can build between two characters in a scene and you know exactly what's going on without all the blow by blow detail we get these days. I just placed holds on a few more of her back list at the library.
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Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Mon May 4th, 2009, 8:47 pm

Re the Cornwall stuff...
I'm not a native Cornishwoman (or my surname would begin with Tre-, Pol- or Pen-), but I do spend about a week every year in Fowey (pronounced Foy), where duM first lived before she relocated to Menabilly nearby. The Cornish are incredibly insular, very friendly as long as you are a tourist, but understandably resentful of 'incomers' with money who have changed the place. And duM was an incomer who changed Fowey beyond recognition. Yes, she brought it a degree of prosperity, but that prosperity has also meant a distortion that is occurring in a lot of small English towns. For instance, Polruan (the town across the harbor from Fowey) is almost entirely composed of rental properties nowadays, while locals struggle to find a home they can afford. (I looked at property prices a year ago, and on a square footage basis, the prices are equivalent to Manhattan... but with much better views.) I know of a number of 'Incomers' who have lived in Fowey or Polruan and eventually left because they were never accepted by the community. Some others (such as musician/taxi-driver/actor I know) have fared well, but it is very hard to be accepted.

I'm glad to hear the duM festival is ongoing bec. there were fears that they would have to cancel it as the original Lottery funding was running out. I think that and the August regatta keep the area alive.

For anyone going there, it is possibly the most beautiful spot I know with endless walks along the cliffs and through the woods (this time last year, saw carpets of bluebells and primroses.) Oddly, although I started reading duM's books when I was 14, when I discovered Fowey at the age of 25, it was because of a ticket agent at Paddington Station, not because of duM. Go in early spring or fall to avoid the crowds.

For those who have read her first book about shipbuilding, the ship builders in Polruan are still working, loudly, every day.

Some other historical trivia about Fowey: it's the only deep-water port south of Plymouth, and so despite its tiny size, was a Luftwaffe target in WW2. And it can boast another literary figure: Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch. Anyone who has read Helene Hanff's "84 Charing Cross Road" will know him as "Q", whose writings on literature sent her on her quest for books.

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Post by Chatterbox » Mon May 4th, 2009, 8:57 pm

A quick snap of Lantic Bay, abt 2 miles along the coast northward from Fowey/Menabilly... (hoping that the attachment works!!)
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Mon May 4th, 2009, 10:00 pm

And it can boast another literary figure: Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch. Anyone who has read Helene Hanff's "84 Charing Cross Road" will know him as "Q", whose writings on literature sent her on her quest for books.
Interesting - I'm currently reading Castle Dor which was started by Q and finished by D du M. A bit of a retelling of the story of Tristan and Iseult (sp?).

I wish I could go there one of these days. I just love big rocky coastlines (Oregon coast is tops with me).
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chuck
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libraries

Post by chuck » Tue May 5th, 2009, 2:30 am

[quote=""Misfit""]I so agree, its just amazing to see the chemistry she can build between two characters in a scene and you know exactly what's going on without all the blow by blow detail we get these days. I just placed holds on a few more of her back list at the library.[/quote]

Libraries.....Aren't they great?.....They have many of those great classics stored in their dusty stacks......I say dust them off and display them or put them back into circulation.....

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Tue May 5th, 2009, 12:26 pm

[quote=""chuck""]Libraries.....Aren't they great?.....They have many of those great classics stored in their dusty stacks......I say dust them off and display them or put them back into circulation.....[/quote]

I know. Instead of getting a brand new edition of The King's General I got to read the first edition instead. My county library system and it's catalog is awesome. I really need to stop next time and kiss the ground it's built upon :) :)
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat June 13th, 2009, 10:24 pm

One of my Amazon friends tipped me off to a feature on dumaurier.org. You can look at long clips from movies based on her books and more here. Major time suck though - but worth it on My Cousin Rachel. Oooh, that young Richard Burton ;) :) :p :o
At home with a good book and the cat...
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