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HF aimed at Jr. High girls

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

HF aimed at Jr. High girls

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu August 28th, 2008, 12:20 am

And I thought, as long as I started the boy's thread, better start one for girls. Actually, there is a lot out there for girls -- maybe some good tips would include books you would not recommend for this age (despite their being called YA) due to content that was objectionable or just plain vapid, as well as those you would.
I think I heard Divia say something like this about the Luxe.

So on my recommended list, I would start with Elizabeth Speare's Witch of Blackbird Pond. I'd be hesitant about the classics, like Pride and Prejudice and Little Women, until I had a good feel for the reading level of the young lady in question. Those have a pretty chewy vocabulary by today's reading standards.

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Thu August 28th, 2008, 12:30 am

yes the Luxe series is nothing more that catty girls in victorian dresses. Its not very accurate.

I just finished Keeping Corner about a young woman in India during WWII. She is a widow and therefore must stay in her house for an entire year. It was very good.

Earlier this summer I finished Climbing the Stairs about another girl in India during WWII. This girl was more educated and driven to go to college so it was different than the first book which delt with more cultural issues.

Queen Soprano was an excellent read about a young woman who is forbidden to sing even though her voice is amazing. In Italy the Pope has outlawed it.

A Northern Light is still my fav. book of all time when it comes to YA stuff.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Thu August 28th, 2008, 10:12 am

"MLE" wrote:
So on my recommended list, I would start with Elizabeth Speare's Witch of Blackbird Pond. I'd be hesitant about the classics, like Pride and Prejudice and Little Women, until I had a good feel for the reading level of the young lady in question. Those have a pretty chewy vocabulary by today's reading standards.



I read Witch of Blackbird Pond not too long ago and really enjoyed it! I will try to rustle up the review and post it!

User avatar
Evangeline H
Scribbler

Postby Evangeline H » Wed September 3rd, 2008, 5:49 am

Anything by Ann Rinaldi. She has written excellent, excellent YA historical fiction. Her novels sparked my love for history.
Edwardian Promenade - la belle epoque in our modern world!

User avatar
Jack
Reader
Location: California

Postby Jack » Fri September 5th, 2008, 4:43 am

Alchemy of Fire, Lady Illena, Prisoner of Tordesillas. These should get you going.

User avatar
Jack
Reader
Location: California

Postby Jack » Fri September 5th, 2008, 5:07 am

I almost forgot two really good ones. The Second Mrs. Giaconda would be enjoyable for a gal, and A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver, by E. L. Konigsburg will be really good. I Rode a Horse of Milk White Jade, and Caddie Woodlawn are nice books for young ladies, and Strongbow, by Morgan Llwellyn is also very good. You have to be careful with Llwellyn, she is often not for younger audiences. She can be a little graphic with the physical love, but in this case she isn't at all, and the book is only @180 pp, something also not the norm for her. Don't get me wrong, I really enjoy all of her work, and her piece on Granniule the female Irish pirate who had a face to face meeting (in real life) with Queen Elizabeth is first rate. But this thread is about YA stuff for gals, not adult material.

I'll try to go through my library and come up with some more materials-I am fortunate in that I have two rooms semi devoted to being "libraries" so I can hold onto my books, but it is football season (American) and I am a coach, so I also have white boards on walls, and I spend at least 50 hours a week in practice or watching film of opponents and scheming to defeat them, I am told by a friend that is the reason for my love of history and its conflicts. Who knows. Enjoy the books!!!

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Fri September 5th, 2008, 2:22 pm

>But this thread is about YA stuff for gals

It is? My DH read every HF he could get his hands on, and think many boys would enjoy them as well.

>But not adult material

Why not? How do you define YA versus adult? I was reading adult material at 11 (at a time that we weren't allowed in the adult section till we were 13, but I got by thanks to my big sis!). I think some of the stuff now marketed to YA are an insult to their intelligence. Teens and preteens should be exposed to a variety of books accrding to their reading level. So recommend away, if you know an 'adult' book that would be good for this age.

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri September 5th, 2008, 2:34 pm

Me I never had kids so I am no judge of what's appropriate for a teenager, especially in this day and age. I see no one has mentioned Gwen Bristow. Her books are very good and clean as a whistle. She can actually build a nice job of romance and sexual tension in a couple with just kisses. I've got a list of her books here. Calico Palace is my all time favorite, Jubilee Trail and Celia Garth close seconds.

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat September 6th, 2008, 1:40 am

"Ash" wrote:>But this thread is about YA stuff for gals

It is? My DH read every HF he could get his hands on, and think many boys would enjoy them as well.

>But not adult material

Why not? How do you define YA versus adult? I was reading adult material at 11 (at a time that we weren't allowed in the adult section till we were 13, but I got by thanks to my big sis!). I think some of the stuff now marketed to YA are an insult to their intelligence. Teens and preteens should be exposed to a variety of books accrding to their reading level. So recommend away, if you know an 'adult' book that would be good for this age.


Actually, in this usage, by 'adult' I meant sexually explicit. For instance, my library has 'Gone With the Wind' under YA, not because it is juvenile in theme or content -- far from it -- but because you don't have to worry about the negative impact on younger readers. ( I posted about this on another thread, I'll go dig it up.)

I started another thread on 'recommended for boys.' Of course, there is a great deal of overlap in the statistical bell curves re what each gender will like.

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat September 6th, 2008, 3:00 am

Okay, this is from Misfit's Trade Winds review thread, and should explain my concerns regarding YA HF for girls:

I liked Trade Winds, but yes, I do have a problem with that rape scene. I will try to be boil down my years of counseling women with sexual problems to a few paragraphs in explaining why:

Women tend to be verbal/textual, where men are visual. This is why men have girlie magazines full of pictures and women have romance novels -- both can run the gamut from mild to horrific. The problem comes from the material that first crosses a youngster's path at the time they are first beginning to be sexually interested. These images (textual or graphic) have a very lasting effect -- one of the words currently in use is 'imprinting' -- because there is no context for those images. This shapes what titillates the person in the future.

A girl whose first encounter with sexual stimulation is a written rape scene in which the victim is portrayed as enjoying it, either then or eventually, pre-conditions her to fantasize violence linked with sex. However, this does not equate to enjoying violence in real-life. The result, if the girl repeats the images over and over in her mind for stimulation, is a mental picture that is always out-of-sync with normal physical realities, resulting in less satisfaction with healthy sexual experience.

And that is the real cost of those literary rape scenarios, even the ones that are not graphic, like Trade Winds. Males generally, and females with the context of real sexual experience, are not at risk. But the developing human psyche is terribly fragile and moldable in this area.


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