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We're British, Innit

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Kveto from Prague
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Post by Kveto from Prague » Thu January 29th, 2009, 10:56 pm

[QUOTE=Anita Davison;19114]All Things English
- dogging - Never known anyone who indulges in this and have no inclination to
- dislike of Germans - Germans are fine it's the French we can't stand

as my old English boss used to say "the wogs start at Calais." :-)

the most English thing I can imagine is good old Marmite.

just in case anyones interested. in the olden days in England, syphillis was known as the "French disease". of course, in France it was known as the "english disease".

Anita Davison
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I Wanna Be Rowan's friend - Sob

Post by Anita Davison » Thu January 29th, 2009, 10:56 pm

[quote=""Rowan""]Awww I wouldn't call you a Miserable Brit at all. But then I'm not your friend. :p

I'm at the Ps now and I've concluded that the United States and Great Britain are like twins who live the same lives, just not right next door.
[/quote]

Hi Rowan

I agree with the second one too. Since I began writing/blogging, I have had more laughs and found more empathy with my US and Austrailan - not to forget the New Zealand 'virtual friends' than I do with the English.

Us 'Brits' are in danger of taking ourselves to seriously sometimes.[I'm used to being called a Brit now - except by that Ann Maurice House Doctor , just gimme five minutes with that bitch and the work Ewooo will have new meaning]
Anita
Anita Davison
Proofread carefully to see if you any words out ~ Unknown

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Post by Anita Davison » Thu January 29th, 2009, 11:08 pm

Regarding Rowan's comment about witchcraft - I used to work in IT at the Royal Cornwall Hospital in Truro and for the spiritual welfare of patients they had on the staff:
A Catholic Priest
A Rabbi
A Church of England Minister, and
A White Witch

and I have lived in the North of England for one year after having spent all my life in the South. It's true about people talking to you -We have never been treated so well in restaurants, without exception the staff in every place we have visited in have actually cared whether you enjoyed the meal or not - in Lodon you're lucky in the waiting staff speak English!
Anita Davison
Proofread carefully to see if you any words out ~ Unknown

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Fri January 30th, 2009, 1:30 am

After living in London for a year, I moved to Sheffield in Yorkshire.

I remember being totally shocked when I was walking through a laneway and the person coming the other way stopped and had a ten minute conversation with me!
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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Fri January 30th, 2009, 8:37 am

[quote=""Christina""]What a fun thread!



And I think there is a big north-south divide. Being from the north, it always amused me that friends from the south were amazed when people whom they did not know spoke to them (told them their life histories!!) just because they happened to be in the same queue. In the north that's what people do. My experiences in the south - especially in London - are that no one even makes eye-contact (but I might be mistaken and am willing to be corrected!).[/quote]


There is also a belief that people from the north wear flat caps and own whippets! Funnily enough my parents did own whippets but they're from Ealing in London. LOL. The northerners are supposed to be more friendly than the southerners, but I don't know whether that's because we're supposedly a little more blunt when speaking to people. Or, in other words, nosey parkers!! :D
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Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Fri January 30th, 2009, 10:56 am

Yes it's true "northerners" are more friendly, in fact I think anyone outside London is more friendly! I really notice it, and everywhere else seems more relaxed, although I'm not sure if the other big cities, like Manchester & Birmingham, are as unfriendly as London.

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Christina
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Post by Christina » Sat January 31st, 2009, 11:05 pm

Oh, even in cities like Leeds, it's the same in the north! People are friendlier but also assume that you are friendlier too and maybe a balance is called for! At risk of sounding like a GOW (grumpy old woman) I sometimes dread getting on a bus or train because I just know, if someone sits down beside you - just when you're in the middle of a train of thought - someone is about to tell you their life history. Sometimes it's fun and interesting, and other times it's an imposition. I once was on a (fortunately relatively short) train journey between Leeds and Manchester, trying to recover from some angst-filled event, when an elderly woman decided I should hear the whole history of her daughter's hysterectomy. There is only so much nodding and smiling you can do - LOL.

Maybe in the north there are insufficient boundaries and people think they can just walk in as though they have always known you and you want to hear their story. In the south, maybe the boundaries are more like solid walls, cutting everyone out. It's all rather like a Victoria Wood sketch. Have you even been on holiday alone - with the purpose of being alone and contemplative - and someone decides to 'adopt' you because they have the mistaken idea that if you are alone, you are lonely? I have! I ended up dodging in and out of cafes and everywhere I went, these people appeared, saying, "Oh, there you are! You don't want to be on your own. You should have told us you were here and we'd have come with you!" Aaaagh!!!! LOL

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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sun February 1st, 2009, 11:29 am

Oh, I think Leeds and York are pretty friendly cities! You're right, Christina, if you're wanting a little peace and quiet with a coffee in a cafe, someone is bound to sit next and start chatting away, even if it's about how bad the weather has been. :D
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Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sun February 1st, 2009, 6:43 pm

[quote=""Vanessa""]The northerners are supposed to be more friendly than the southerners, [/quote]LOL! It's the opposite here in the States.

And complete strangers to one another here in the South will most definitely tell you their complete current family stories and situations most anywhere you are. Londoners sound like they have the same rep as New Yorkers though. ;)
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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Sun February 1st, 2009, 7:52 pm

I'm from Israel which is rather like that and I love it. One just has to take the Ancient Mariner moments in stride.

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