Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

FOOL by Christopher Moore

Post Reply
User avatar
Leyland
Bibliophile
Posts: 1042
Joined: August 2008
Location: Travelers Rest SC

FOOL by Christopher Moore

Post by Leyland » Sun January 25th, 2009, 2:56 am

I don't know if I'm in the same company with any other Chris Moore fans here at HFO, but take a listen to him describing his latest novel, Fool. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lc7iZWnLwIw

He's retelling Shakespeare's King Lear from the fool's POV in an unconventional Elizabethan/modern American slang kinda British-inspired humorous way that even rearranges geography a bit to include MacBeth's witches. The story is set in a mythical British medieval world in Moore's very unique way. If you've ever read Moore, an author of absurdist fiction, then you understand why I say unique. In a good way of course.

Here are links to his bio and to his blog for chapter one of Fool:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christophe ... uthor[/url)

WARNING (pasted from Moore's blog)
This is a bawdy tale. Herein you will find gratuitous shagging, murder, spanking, maiming, treason, and heretofore unexplored heights of vulgarity and profanity, as well as non-traditional grammar, spit infinitives, and the odd wank. If that sort of thing bothers you, then gentle reader pass by, for we only endeavor to entertain, not to offend. That said, if that’s the sort of thing you think you might enjoy, then you have happened onto the perfect story! http://blog.chrismoore.com/index.php/archives/303



btw - I'm halfway through his 2007 You Suck, a sequel to Bloodsucking Fiends, but lost it in a black hole in my house a couple weeks ago. I hope the hole regurgitates it soon.
Last edited by Leyland on Sun January 25th, 2009, 3:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: To make the Warning come before the blog link pretty much
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Wed January 28th, 2009, 1:16 pm

Interesting Leyland. Is his style anything like Robert Nye's Fastolf - or Falstaff - can't remember the spelling. I read it many years ago and it was about Shakespeare's character Falstaff, but full of all the things Moore mentions as caveats!
Hope you find the book.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Wed January 28th, 2009, 1:41 pm

I've only read Lamb, and I was surprised by how well done it was. I've tried to read his others and they just didn't take. Interested in Fool tho, because like Lamb, its a twist on a very familiar story.

User avatar
Leyland
Bibliophile
Posts: 1042
Joined: August 2008
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Post by Leyland » Thu February 5th, 2009, 2:11 pm

I just read a funny interview between Chris Moore and Mike Spradlin, author of The Youngest Templar and other YA fiction. Any guy who calls the Templars the Hell's Angels of the Middle Ages is OK with me.

Here's an excerpt or two:

Chris Moore: Okay, let's say you're a soldier under Saladin, during the Crusades. What's you're favorite thing to kill Crusaders with (and don't say, the weather, because I already called that one.)?

Mike Spradlin: If I have to use a medieval weapon, I'll stick with what worked and that would be a scimitar. Only I'd ask my scimitar guy to make mine extra long because the Crusaders used a lot of lances which are way long and tend to hurt a lot and mess up your internal organs when you're impaled by one. To compensate for the extra length, I'd also invent aluminum earlier so it could be bonded with the bronze and make the scimitar lighter and easier to swing. Then I'd be in the middle of a battle and some Crusader would be all over confident because he'd think I'm tired and my scimitar is too heavy to swing, but then I'd say "AHA! I invented aluminum this morning! Big surprise Mr. Dead Crusader Guy! I love this job!"

If that didn't work, I'd try beans.

Chris Moore: So, if Saladin had dune buggies, but the crusaders had trained T-Rex's, who would win?

Mike Spradlin: I ran a lot of simulations on this, but there are just too many variables, the most important being the top end speed of the dune buggy. This would be completely dependent on its engine size and horsepower. Some scientists speculate a T-Rex's could run up to forty miles an hour over short distances, so if the dune buggies max out at 35 mph in the thick sand, Saladin is toast. But if they can go faster, they just outrun the T-Rex's. However, I would submit T-Rex's would be very difficult to train and extremely unreliable. If they saw their food driving away, they'd be royally ticked and probably turn on the Crusaders and eat them. So I'm with Saladin in squeaker.

Read the Borders article in full here - http://www.borders.com/online/store/Art ... adlinmoore
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

Post Reply

Return to “Historical Fantasy”