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What Are You Reading (Jan 2009 edition)?

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Swampy
Scribbler
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Joined: January 2009

Post by Swampy » Mon January 26th, 2009, 6:02 am

I've just finished Bones of the Hill by Conn Iggulden and Azincourt by Bernard Cornwell and have a couple of books waiting in the wings by Simon Scarrow ( Fire and Sword - book three in the genrals series and the first of the Cato series).

Currently reading a new author for me - Robyn White and her book Breatheren.

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EC2
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Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
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Post by EC2 » Mon January 26th, 2009, 9:30 am

[QUOTE=
Currently reading a new author for me - Robyn White and her book Breatheren.[/QUOTE]

Would that be Robyn Young, Swampy?
I got a couple of hundred pages into Bretheren but had to put it down - usual stuff about historical errors of detail and mindset dragging me out of the story.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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sweetpotatoboy
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Location: London, UK

Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon January 26th, 2009, 11:26 am

Just started Royal Subjects: A Biographer's Encounters by Theo Aronson, a memoir of meetings with royals in the course of writing his many historical biographies.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Location: London, UK

Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon January 26th, 2009, 2:59 pm

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]Just started Royal Subjects: A Biographer's Encounters by Theo Aronson, a memoir of meetings with royals in the course of writing his many historical biographies.[/quote]

Just had to relate one of the anecdotes in this book, though not one witnessed first-hand by the author.

The (current) Queen was visiting her elderly cousin Princess Alice (Countess of Athlone). As the Queen was leaving, Princess Alice said to her: "Turn off the heater on your way out. We only put it on because you were coming."

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Kasthu
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Location: Radnor, PA
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Post by Kasthu » Mon January 26th, 2009, 5:20 pm

Currently about 3/4 through The Glassblower of Murano, by Marina Fiorato Very, very good so far.

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Mon January 26th, 2009, 6:59 pm

Started a non-fiction book on Elizabeth I by Elizabeth Jenkins (Elizabeth the Great).

annis
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Post by annis » Mon January 26th, 2009, 8:43 pm

Posted by Swampy
Currently reading a new author for me - Robyn White and her book Breatheren
.
Maybe you're mixing up Robyn Young and Jack Whyte, swampy. JW has also written a series featuring the Templars, which isn't half bad. The first two are out already: "The Knights of the Black and White" and "Standard of Honor". The third volume in the trilogy is due for publication later this year- "Order in Chaos".

Currently reading "The Mock Funeral: a novel of the Irish Riots on the Goldfields of New Zealand", by David McGill, a story of the Fenian uprisings on the West Coast of New Zealand in 1868. This is a fictional reprise of his earlier non-ficton book "The Lion and the Wolfhound" on the same subject.

gyrehead
Reader
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Post by gyrehead » Mon January 26th, 2009, 9:34 pm

I was lucky enough to get my hands on a UK proof of Iain Pears Stone's Fall and was able to devour it this weekend despite a multitude of distractions. Wonderful book and my favorite of his works by far. Other than that, I'm not really allowed to say.

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lindymc
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Post by lindymc » Mon January 26th, 2009, 9:57 pm

Following the recent discussions re. Susan Howatch's family saga novels with their parallels to early English history, I've started reading Penmarric.
She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain. (1873) -- Louisa May Alcott

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Misfit
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Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Mon January 26th, 2009, 11:21 pm

[quote=""lindymc""]Following the recent discussions re. Susan Howatch's family saga novels with their parallels to early English history, I've started reading Penmarric.[/quote]

I've got about 200 or so pages left and just finishing up the book with "Richard's" POV, the last book is "John's" POV. Really interesting how she worked in the disputes between the various sons (legitimate and illegitimate) and their rebellion against their father.

I had to order Cashelmara and then Wheel of Fortune I can get from the library. I so have to read the last one with John of Gaunt and (please let her be in it :o :) ) Katherine.

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