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What Are You Reading (Jan 2009 edition)?

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chuck
Bibliophile
Posts: 1073
Joined: August 2008
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Classic Reads

Post by chuck » Fri January 23rd, 2009, 4:40 pm

[quote=""annis""]Hi Chuck - I just recently discovered another writer of swashbucling tales ca. 1920s. I hadn't heard of him before, but I picked up one of his books in a online sale, called "Over the Hills".
Jeffery Farnol
http://www.violetbooks.com/gal-farnol.html
Is he one you've come across?

Currently reading Michael Faber's satire
"The Fire Gospel: the Myth of Prometheus"[/quote]

Hey Annis...Thanks for the heads up....I'm always on the look out for Classic Swashbucklers.....I enjoyed Reverte's "Kings Gold".....Again thank you

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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4270
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Fri January 23rd, 2009, 7:54 pm

I've just started Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 910
Joined: August 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by Amanda » Sat January 24th, 2009, 12:13 pm

I am just about to start Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky.

Just finished Time and Chance. Gee I love a SKP books!

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AuntiePam
Reader
Posts: 57
Joined: December 2008

Post by AuntiePam » Sat January 24th, 2009, 5:09 pm

Recently finished Silverlock by John Myers Myers -- fantasy about a callow young man shipwrecked in The Commonwealth. He's rescued, gets turned into a pig by Circe, and meets characters from literature as he explores and matures. It was fun looking for the literary references, even though I probably missed most of them.

Also finished The Marriage of Sticks by Jonathan Carroll. The story had some plot issues but Carroll's writing is such that I couldn't put the book down. I didn't like Miranda, the main character. She reminded me of Edna from The Awakening -- much too concerned about her own happiness and fulfillment, no matter how others were affected. But Carroll put her through hell and I was sympathizing with her by the end of the book.

Currently reading Already Dead, supernatural fiction with vampires and zombies by Charlie Huston, who writes the best dialogue since Elmore Leonard.

Next up is A Pale Blue Eye by Louis Bayard.

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lindymc
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Posts: 144
Joined: August 2008

Post by lindymc » Sat January 24th, 2009, 9:03 pm

I finished The Camomile Lawn by Mary Wesley this morning, an enjoyable, very readable WWII novel.

Now I've started Tatiana and Alexander. Sometimes I'm a bit reluctant to start a sequel, but so far I am liking this as well as (or maybe at this point, even better than) The Bronze Horseman.
She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain. (1873) -- Louisa May Alcott

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Misfit
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Posts: 9581
Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Sat January 24th, 2009, 9:48 pm

[quote=""lindymc""]Now I've started Tatiana and Alexander. Sometimes I'm a bit reluctant to start a sequel, but so far I am liking this as well as (or maybe at this point, even better than) The Bronze Horseman.[/quote]

I'm patiently waiting for The Bronze Horseman from the library. I'm hold #3 of 4. Might be a while.....

I've started Penmarric by Susan Howatch. What a surprise to start what you're expecting to be only a big fat saga in 19C Corwall, but she's also telling it like it's the story of Henry II, Eleanor and their children. Hard to explain but very good so far. Bummer though, someone's marked up the book with pencil so I've got my who is who answer without being able to guess for myself :mad: :mad: :mad:

annis
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Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Sat January 24th, 2009, 9:58 pm

"Penmarric' was one of those stay-up-all-night reads for me when it first came out in the 1970s. I seem to recall that the chapter headings provide clues about the Plantagenet parallels, though it's been a long time--

"Cashelmara" and "Wheel of Fortine" continue the Plantagenet family parallel theme. <"Cashelmara" is based on the story of Edward I, Edward II, and Edward III, ending as Edward III overthrows his mother's lover and claims the throne as his own. "The Wheel of Fortune" picks up the same story about half way through Edward III's life (he is now Bobby Godwin), and follows the story through the life of his sons Edward The Black Prince (Robert), John (John of Gaunt) and Thomas (Thomas of Woodstock), his grandsons Kester (Richard II) and Harry (Henry IV), and his great grandson Henry V (Hal).>

*EDIT I see that you've already worked this out in your post about Susan Howatch :)
Last edited by annis on Sat January 24th, 2009, 10:12 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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Misfit
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Posts: 9581
Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Sun January 25th, 2009, 12:09 am

[quote=""annis""]*EDIT I see that you've already worked this out in your post about Susan Howatch :) [/quote]

Yes I did, but thanks for the input anyway. I'm not even 100 pages into it but I suspect it could be an all-nighter, or at the very least a huge mistake if I wake up in the middle of the night and think I'm going to read one or two chapters and I'll be able to go back to sleep. Right.

I'm loving Mark/Henry II character, flawed as it is and it's fun that he's working on writing up a historical paper on King John and how history has not given him a fair shake. Nice twist.

Ash
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Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Sun January 25th, 2009, 4:40 am

Gave up on 'The Red Leather Diary'. Memoir more than fiction, but written in reporter style, just a waste of an excellent story - woman finds a diary from 1930s NYC, finds the now adult owner, and writes her story.

I'm having trouble with books lately, so I found just the cure: Terry Pratchett: the wit and wisdom of Discworld. Yes yes, I could just reread all of his books (been there, done that);all the best bits are in this collection and I am having a blast reading it!

leehow
Reader
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Joined: August 2008
Location: birmingham,england

Post by leehow » Sun January 25th, 2009, 10:43 am

In Gallant Company by Alexander Kent

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