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What Are You Reading (Jan 2009 edition)?

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cw gortner
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Post by cw gortner » Tue January 20th, 2009, 3:07 am

I couldn't finish The Miracles of Prato - between the "unnatural lusts" of the provost and "ethereal beauty" of the main character, I did something I rarely do: I decided not to read further. I usually do everything possible to finish a book; it's an OCD thing with me. I figure, there just has to be something in it I'll like. This one has a lot to commend it as far as atmosphere goes but I found I couldn't deal with the underpinnings of strict moral Catholicism embedded in it; and I can't figure out whether it's the writers' actual opinions or just a really accurate interpretation of the POV at the time. Whichever the case, a shame.

I'm now reading Pauline Gedge's The Seer of Egypt, the second in her King's Man Trilogy and sequel to The Twice Born. Sublime.
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Toelistangan
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Post by Toelistangan » Tue January 20th, 2009, 5:52 am

Just finished with Requiem by Robyn Young, interesting story with great characters in history such as William Wallace, Edward Longshanks and Philippe Le Bel.
I'm currently reading World Without End by Ken Follett.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue January 20th, 2009, 12:09 pm

[quote=""Toelistangan""]Just finished with Requiem by Robyn Young, interesting story with great characters in history such as William Wallace, Edward Longshanks and Philippe Le Bel.
I'm currently reading World Without End by Ken Follett.[/quote]

I started reading Brethren by Robyn Young - the first in the trilogy - but didn't get further than half way because I couldn't believe that her characters were of their time, including Henry III. It's another of those books where I might have got through it if it had been set in another period.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue January 20th, 2009, 12:10 pm

I tired to read Booths Sister, but it wasnt that good.
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue January 20th, 2009, 12:13 pm

[quote=""Amanda""]Would this be some strange kind of witchcraft?? Or a strong compulsion to bleach ones hair?? :p

I am reading Time and Chance atm, and I like the confrontation between Eleanor and Rosamund, and how it was a catalyst for the troubles between Henry and Eleanor that a brewing in the future.[/quote]

LOL! Horrified shock I would think! There are strong elements of witchcraft in The Death Maze. Some readers may find it unpleasant that a live black cat is boiled to death in a cauldron in the first few pages... But the whole Eleanor/Rosamund situation in TDM is extremely bizarre. It's not just stretching history, it's pure and very dark fantasy. I'll report on it fully when I'm done.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Tue January 20th, 2009, 3:15 pm

[quote=""Divia""]I tired to read Booths Sister, but it wasnt that good.[/quote]

I thought that name hit a bell. There was some publisher that was sending out Amazon friend invites last year and offering e versions of this for review. She also posted some odd one/two sentence reviewsof other books and then suggested this book.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue January 20th, 2009, 3:21 pm

Have to add that, having read the next few pages over lunch, an abbot has just addressed Eleanor of Aquitaine as 'Nelly.' :eek: :eek:
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Tue January 20th, 2009, 3:32 pm

[quote=""cw gortner""]I couldn't finish The Miracles of Prato - between the "unnatural lusts" of the provost and "ethereal beauty" of the main character, I did something I rarely do: I decided not to read further. I usually do everything possible to finish a book; it's an OCD thing with me. I figure, there just has to be something in it I'll like. This one has a lot to commend it as far as atmosphere goes but I found I couldn't deal with the underpinnings of strict moral Catholicism embedded in it; and I can't figure out whether it's the writers' actual opinions or just a really accurate interpretation of the POV at the time. Whichever the case, a shame.

I'm now reading Pauline Gedge's The Seer of Egypt, the second in her King's Man Trilogy and sequel to The Twice Born. Sublime.[/quote]

I got about halfway through The Miracles of Prato before I stopped, for different reasons than you. It seemed to me as though it was just another romance story, and one based on very little historical evidence (in fact, I read somewhere that Fra Filippo in fact kidnapped Lucrezia and held her hostage, though of course Wikipedia isn't the be-all and end-all of factual information). And the love story itself is kind of derivative--I suppose there's some attraction to a nun and monk being in love (forbidden love and all of that).

I did finish, however, The Needle in the Blood, and I'm now reading The Founding, by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles.

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Tue January 20th, 2009, 6:07 pm

Currently in the middle of Daphne du Maurier's The King's General and loving it so far. I know 1st person narratives aren't everyone's cup of tea, but I think D. du M had a special talent for it, and this one is another great example. I slide so easily into this kind of story, I feel right at home.

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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
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Post by Vanessa » Tue January 20th, 2009, 6:22 pm

I love Daphne du Maurier's books. I think she's a fabulous author.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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