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A Cloud show from Mount Rainier, WA

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Thu December 11th, 2008, 1:27 am

[quote=""Susan""]There was no one at the lot except us! In fact, there weren't many people in the park at all. The snow on the sides of the road while we were driving up had to have been 12 feet high. We also went to Mt. St. Helens the same day. You have no idea how amazing this all is to east coasters. I live in a state where the highest point is 1,803 feet! I'd love to go back in the summer except my daughter who lives in Seattle is here in the summer. She's an athletic trainer at Seattle Pacific University and spends her summers off here.[/quote]

Having spent most of my life in the Pacific Northwest surrounded by mountains, I don't think I could stand living in the "flatlands".

Mount Saint Helens is very cool. If you're ever here in late summer... take the Windy Ridge road on the east side of the mountain -- although it will scare you to death coming back down. Narrow narrow roads, no guardrail and constant curves so you can't see the uphill traffic. Very cool though, you're driving through old growth never been touched forests and then you take a curve and *beam me up scotty* you're in the middle of the blast zone with downed trees every where, and a rusting car to boot.

Travel tip, go down for a visit to Portland (love downtown and NO SALES TAX), go east on I84 and visit the Columbia River Gorge scenic area. Eons ago the ice floes broke through the cascade and left these huge basalt cliffs and the snow melts have no where to go but down them in waterfall after waterfall. Some you can walk behind (gotta hike though). Here's a fun site where you can look at hikes and sometimes pictures as well.

And if you want to splurge I recommend the Skamania Lodge. Expensive as h*** but the lobby, the view from the porch!! Surprisingly kid friendly for a high end hotel.

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Thu December 11th, 2008, 3:07 am

[quote=""Misfit""]
SonjaMarie, yes one of these days the mountain is going to wake up and we have that good old Lahar thing happening. I'm in the Kent valley so I suspect I'll be instant toast. Ah, remember when Saint Helens blew....[/quote]

Oh yeah I remember Helens. We were watching "The Buddy Holly Story" when a friend of my mom's came to the house and said he had just been in a helicopter near the mountain and saw it explode or was near it afterwards. Now that I'm older I wonder how true that was. But a few years later when I was in Montana I found ash from the eruption! I was only 6.

SM
Last edited by SonjaMarie on Thu December 11th, 2008, 3:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Thanks for pro-Oregon rec, Misfit

Post by Caveowl » Thu December 11th, 2008, 4:43 am

The Oylmpics and the North Cascades in Washington are awesome, too.

Having grown up on a hillside farm east of Portland, where the view from the kitchen was Hood, Rainier, StHelens, the Gorge was practically backyard. And take side trips off I84 and drive some sections of old highway 30, like the Rowena Loops.

For scenic, living on the blue side of the Cascades is even better. Some evenings I must stop reading to watch sunsets over the Three Sisters and Mt Jefferson. If anyone has time to tour Oregon, consider going on up to the Wallowas, too. The Alps of America is probably an exaggeration, but ...

http://www.wallowalakelodge.com/

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Thu December 11th, 2008, 6:24 am

If the Cascadia plate slipped or Mt. Rainier ever blew, god help us all. I remember visiting Rainier and St. Helens when I was a kid, and was just 20 when St. H erupted -- the sunsets for quite some time were magnificent, and we had a terrible winter that year in SLC.

Alan Hovhaness wrote quite a symphony around Mt. St. Helens, with the second movement, Spirit Lake, being one of the most sublime bits of music that I have ever heard. Get the recording that has the Seattle Symphony with Gerard Schwartz conducting.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Thu December 11th, 2008, 12:20 pm

[quote=""Misfit""]Nah, it's quite common for those clouds to form over Rainier, but not in quite such an abundance. Rainier literally makes it's own weather at times, and it is quite an impressive little mountain. And the snow she gets, where else can you drive to 5500' in early July and still have snow over two stories high? Let alone the wildflowers once the snow does melt.[/quote]

Maybe so, but I ain't never seen it before. So for me it was cool. :)
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Thu December 11th, 2008, 2:52 pm

[quote=""Divia""]Maybe so, but I ain't never seen it before. So for me it was cool. :) [/quote]

Happy to share, it was quite a sight.

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Christine Blevins
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Post by Christine Blevins » Thu December 11th, 2008, 4:11 pm

Those are some awesome photos. Back in the eighties we lived in Seattle for about five years, and just being able to see Mt. Rainier on a clear day was a spectacular sight for this girl from the flat-as-a-pancake midwest (the mountain's out!). But I never saw anything as fantastic as these lenticular clouds. Thanks for sharing.

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AuntiePam
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Post by AuntiePam » Fri December 12th, 2008, 3:03 am

Gorgeous photos!

I lived in Seattle from 1967 to 1990, and I remember the traditional sunny day greeting: "The mountain's out!"

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Fri December 12th, 2008, 3:11 am

We have a lot of Current or Previous or Visited Often Washingtonian's here!

SM
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