Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Amazon buisness practices

For discussion about particular book sellers (brick-and-mortar bookstores, online book sellers, auction sites, swap sites, etc.)
User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Amazon buisness practices

Postby fljustice » Sun December 12th, 2010, 9:05 pm

Here's a long article "Books After Amazon" which takes a look at Amazon's business practices over the years and how they have affected the publishing industry. The comments were almost as interesting as the original article.

http://www.bostonreview.net/BR35.6/roychoudhuri.php
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
User signature picture

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sun December 12th, 2010, 10:13 pm

We have got to start patronizing more Amazon rivals and de-monopolize this retailer. I have a Kindle--but I intend to get another e-reader as well.

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Mon December 13th, 2010, 12:06 am

Interesting that the "eBooks selling more copies than printed books" headline only referred to Amazon's sales. Not surprising given that 100% of Amazon customers are online, where B&N, and other retailers still have brick and mortar stores. Of course Amazon will sell more eBooks than hardcopies. A higher percentage of Amazon customers have the latest technology.

I used to love buying used books and movies on Amazon, but the shipping rates now completely offset any savings. $3.99 is great if you're buying a heavy book, but not great for a light one. Even Lulu doesn't charge that much, for crying out loud.

There are some things I just can't get anywhere but Amazon, but I'm going to make an effort to not buy my books from them from now on.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Mon December 13th, 2010, 4:35 am

Thank God for Book Depository! I know some people have had the odd problem with them, but I love 'em :)

User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Postby fljustice » Mon December 13th, 2010, 4:37 pm

"MLE" wrote:We have got to start patronizing more Amazon rivals and de-monopolize this retailer. I have a Kindle--but I intend to get another e-reader as well.


My publisher was mixed up with the disappearing buy button mess when Amazon was squeezing everyone to use their POD subsidiary. They sued and won, but it was a bloody fight. I rarely buy from Amazon, and hold my nose whenever I have to. I wish I didn't have my book listed there, but they are the 500 pound gorilla and I do like those checks! (Not sure which emoticon to use for horribly conflicted.)
Faith L. Justice, Author Website

User signature picture

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Mon December 13th, 2010, 6:10 pm

I didn't read the entire article, but of what I did read, what stood out to me was Amazon's alleged "discriminatory pricing" (or whatever they call it). Whereby they charge different customers different prices for the same items, based on the customer's buying history. That, to me, sounds illegal with a capital "I." Can you imagine a bricks-and-mortar store trying to pull a stunt like that? I wonder how Amazon manages to get away with it?

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Postby Divia » Mon December 13th, 2010, 9:30 pm

"LoveHistory" wrote:I used to love buying used books and movies on Amazon, but the shipping rates now completely offset any savings. $3.99 is great if you're buying a heavy book, but not great for a light one. Even Lulu doesn't charge that much, for crying out loud.

There are some things I just can't get anywhere but Amazon, but I'm going to make an effort to not buy my books from them from now on.


Yeah I told my mom to buy used stuff from Amazon and she said what's the point when they are only a dollar or two of and then the shipping jacks up the price so much.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Mon December 13th, 2010, 9:41 pm

"Michy" wrote:I didn't read the entire article, but of what I did read, what stood out to me was Amazon's alleged "discriminatory pricing" (or whatever they call it). Whereby they charge different customers different prices for the same items, based on the customer's buying history. That, to me, sounds illegal with a capital "I." Can you imagine a bricks-and-mortar store trying to pull a stunt like that? I wonder how Amazon manages to get away with it?


Yeah. I bet those of us who buy less get charged more, when we'd probably be willing to buy more if the prices were better. The principal of adverse selection goes retail.

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Tue December 14th, 2010, 3:59 am

It's similar, in a way, to what many retailers do when they give "frequent shopper" points that can eventually be converted into discounts to use on future purchases. In essence, they're giving a type of price break to those who shop from them the most. But these practices are acceptable to consumers because they are above-board and straightforward, and everyone understands what's going on. In Amazon's case, however, it is entirely secretive, so that no one understands how much more or less they are paying for an item compared to anyone else. Again, I don't see how they get by with it, unless being an online-only retailer makes them harder to nail.

Speaking of "adverse selection" .... what always gets me is when banks and telephone carriers and others offer great incentives to attract new customers, an have the nerve to send these offers to their existing customers. My bank has been inundating me lately with offers of $150 if I'll just open a new checking account with them. Hey, I've been a loyal customer of theirs for years and years. So where's my $150? :mad:

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Thu December 16th, 2010, 12:48 am

I'm having issues with Lulu (who I've used for years) and am looking into other options for my little publishing business. In doing some preliminary research of other companies with comparable services I found that Booksurge is "merging with" Createspace.

Another one to mark off my list.


Return to “Book Sellers/Traders”