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Book search - illus. Children’s book re Old man, moon, devil

Can't remember the name of the book and/or the author? Ask here--maybe we can help!
Currently reading: The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor
Interest in HF: I’ve always loved fiction and history, so historical fiction is my happy reading zone. I think the books that cemented hist fic as my favourite were Random Passage and Waiting for Time by Bernice Morgan. I have a special interest in: WWII, Ireland, England, Italy, Canada (especially Newfoundland and Labrador), women’s history/herstory and folklore.
Favorite HF book: Can’t pick one. Recently enjoyed The Good People by Hannah Kent.
Preferred HF: I have a special interest in WWII period, especially relating to women’s history, codebreaking work, Bletchley Park. I tend to most enjoy literary fiction rather than comercial or popular fiction, but read a range.
Location: Canada

Book search - illus. Children’s book re Old man, moon, devil

Postby Baylou » Tue December 19th, 2017, 7:55 pm

I’ve been looking for this book for about 10 years now with no luck. I don’t know the name or title. Just these things that I remember from reading it in the 1970s or early 80s:

It was an illustrated children’s book about how the old man ended up in the moon with only a spider for company (and an illustration of the old man sitting on the moon with the spider was the last or one of the last in the book). The old man made a deal with the devil or lost a bet with the devil or something like that. I recall that the devil was dressed as a sort of old-fashioned gentleman, but if you looked closely his hooves were visible, I think. And the book had a kind of old-fashioned quality in the way the characters were depicted, like in historical clothes. The illustrations were kind of muted colours and there were winter scenes, maybe one with a sleigh in snow. And another scene in a bar or tavern or pub.

Ring any bells with anyone?

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