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Bricks!

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sgn1
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Bricks!

Postby sgn1 » Thu March 17th, 2011, 1:39 pm

Oh yes, from Roman, odd stuff that might be Viking era, medieval to post medieval, I can't resist them :rolleyes: Particular favourites are the mid Victorian bricks found locally - they often have makers' stamps on them, which I can tie in directly with the local trade directories. Great stuff, but rather heavy and cumbersome to collect and store. But I don't care :p

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fljustice
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Location: Brooklyn, NY
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Postby fljustice » Thu March 17th, 2011, 3:43 pm

"sgn1" wrote:Oh yes, from Roman, odd stuff that might be Viking era, medieval to post medieval, I can't resist them :rolleyes: Particular favourites are the mid Victorian bricks found locally - they often have makers' stamps on them, which I can tie in directly with the local trade directories. Great stuff, but rather heavy and cumbersome to collect and store. But I don't care :p


I kept a couple of bricks from the old schoolhouse that my grandfather bought and where my father was born. Made good door stops!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
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LoveHistory
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Thu March 17th, 2011, 6:22 pm

I love finding old bricks. I don't keep them though.

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sgn1
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Postby sgn1 » Sat March 19th, 2011, 12:10 pm

Doorstops? Great! Bricks are so flexible :)

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fljustice
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Postby fljustice » Sat March 19th, 2011, 2:22 pm

"sgn1" wrote:Doorstops? Great! Bricks are so flexible :)


Also make good bookshelves with a couple of planks!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website

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rockygirl
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Location: Upstate New York

Postby rockygirl » Wed March 23rd, 2011, 2:34 am

When I was in Savannah, Georgia, the tour guides raved about the Savannah yellow bricks (which were not exactly yellow). Until then, I had never thought about how many different types of bricks there are.

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parthianbow
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Postby parthianbow » Wed March 23rd, 2011, 9:16 am

I like bricks too. When I was rotovating our garden last summer, I dug up about 75 red bricks, all of which were stamped from one of the two brick factories that had been present in the village. Both closed down more than 80 years ago, which felt like touching the past. Naturally, I didn't get rid of them. They're sitting by the garage, waiting to be built into an outside BBQ. :D
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

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Ludmilla
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Location: Georgia USA

Postby Ludmilla » Wed March 23rd, 2011, 1:24 pm

"rockygirl" wrote:When I was in Savannah, Georgia, the tour guides raved about the Savannah yellow bricks (which were not exactly yellow). Until then, I had never thought about how many different types of bricks there are.


Why do I want to say Columbus, GA, had a famous brick manufacturer? It rings a vague bell in my memory, but I might be confusing it with the Columbus Iron Works, which is a National Historic Landmark. Columbus was a major industrial center during the civil war at any rate and a great deal of their historic district is brick.

I always found it quaint to stumble upon some of these older towns that still have brick roads.

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LoveHistory
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Postby LoveHistory » Wed March 23rd, 2011, 1:37 pm

"Ludmilla" wrote:
I always found it quaint to stumble upon some of these older towns that still have brick roads.


I love those towns too. I remember back when the pavement was wearing thin enough to have sections missing on Clark street in Tomah you could see the old bricks underneath. Walking from school to the library (about three blocks) was almost like stepping back in time that way. Shame they repaved.

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Ludmilla
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Location: Georgia USA

Postby Ludmilla » Wed March 23rd, 2011, 2:02 pm

I don't know if Ft. Scott, KS, still has the brick roads in their downtown district, but one of my earliest memories is when I was very little going with my mother to take my grandma to the doctor in Ft. Scott and I remember those brick roads. You do feel like you are stepping back in time!


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