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The Glorious Revolution

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

The Glorious Revolution

Postby Misfit » Sun January 3rd, 2010, 5:32 pm

I hadn't known much about this until the last of Pamela Belle's Wintercombe trilogy. One of my friends at Goodreads just finished a book called Civil Bloodthat focuses on this period. We think the publisher is in Canada (not sure). I've ordered it as well and looking forward to reading it.

One thing I'm curious about - if James II was so d*** unpopular and ineffective as a king, why were so many willing to risk all to get him back on the throne?
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Mon January 4th, 2010, 2:29 am

I've often wondered this as well, and commented to that effect on Ariadne's review of "Heartbreaker" a less-than-romantic view of Bonnie Prince Charlie. It seems to me that the only thing BPC succeeded in doing was destroying the Scottish Highlanders :(

http://readingthepast.blogspot.com/2009/12/review-of-heartbreaker-by-elisabeth.html

Ariadne also mentioned on another post a book by Ellis Dillon called "Wild Geese". The Wld Geese were the Irish rebels who fled Ireland for many other lands, including France, beginning after the defeat of James II in 1691 and continuing for some hundred plus years after that. Their contributions to the armies of France from the 1690s through to the time of Napoleon were enormous, most notable of these being their breaking of the English line for Louis the XV's army at the Battle of Fontenoy in 1745.

http://readingthepast.blogspot.com/2009/03/reviews-of-obscure-books-eilis-dillons.html

Just remembered- Anita Davison has written a couple of books which feature Monmouth's rebellion and the Glorious Revolution, called the "Duking Days" series
1) Duking Days: Rebellion, about a young woman whose family's property is confiscated after the Monmouth Rebellion in 1685 England
2) Duking Days: Revolution (2008), about a young wife and her struggle for security on the eve of the 1688 Glorious Revolution
Last edited by annis on Mon January 4th, 2010, 2:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Thu January 7th, 2010, 3:48 am

Seeing we've mentioned Rosemary Sutcliff a bit lately, just thought I'd add this YA novel she wrote about Scottish Jacobite hero, John Graham of Claverhouse, Viscount Dundee. In 1689, after the overthrow of King James VII by William of Orange during the "Glorious Revolution", he became an ardent supporter of the Stuart cause.

"Bonnie Dundee" (1983) -- In exile in Holland, Hugh Herriot recalls the exploits of his youth as a follower of Bonnie Dundee who tried to win back Scotland for the Catholic King James and whose death during a victorious battle proved to be a final blow for the Jacobite cause.


Image

Portrait of Claverhouse.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu January 7th, 2010, 12:23 pm

Bonnie Dundee is on my list to read very soon. One of my friends from Goodreads just read it and enjoyed it. I love these guys with their long curly hair. I suppose they are all wigs or is any of it real?
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Thu January 7th, 2010, 5:13 pm

I'm pretty sure they were usually wigs. In fact, men often either shaved their heads or cut their own hair very short because it was too hot and uncomfortable otherwise with one of those massive wigs on!

The stylish bucket top boots were also distinctive, and there's a very funny bit in Rosemary Sutcliff'd YA novel about the English Civil War, called "Simon", (also very good) where one of the characters becomes the proud owner of a pair of boots with tops so wide that he can't stand with his legs together, but has to waddle around like a duck. He thinks this gives him a dashing, swaggering air, but his friends are hard put not to laugh :)

Image

Dundee in his bucket top boots.

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Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Thu January 7th, 2010, 8:18 pm

I keep trying to reply but my PC has twice frozen when I've attempted to do so!

I agree with you on BPC, Annis. McNeill's portrait of him is harsh but I can't say any of it is inaccurate.

I got about halfway through Civil Blood before stopping. The first chapter was an attention-grabber but I found the rest of the book not nearly as compelling. My bookmark's still in where I left it.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu January 7th, 2010, 8:57 pm

"Ariadne" wrote:I got about halfway through Civil Blood before stopping. The first chapter was an attention-grabber but I found the rest of the book not nearly as compelling. My bookmark's still in where I left it.


Great......although Barb at Goodreads loved it. Time will tell.

Annis, love those boots. I'd be on my face in no time.
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

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princess garnet
Bibliophile
Location: Maryland

Postby princess garnet » Thu January 7th, 2010, 9:36 pm

Plaidy's reissue The Queen's Devotion, formerly titled William's Wife, gives Mary's perspective.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sun January 10th, 2010, 3:17 am

Misfit, if you're going to read "Bonnie Dundee" you might also like to read one Chatterbox added to the English Civil War list- "The Proud Servant", Margaret Irwin's novel about Montrose, faithful supporter of Charles I. To really understand Claverhouse, it's helpful to know something about his illustrious Graham kinsman. Montrose was Dundee's hero and a major influence on his decision to loyally support his King, regardless of his obvious weaknesses.
Last edited by annis on Sun January 10th, 2010, 6:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sun January 10th, 2010, 1:31 pm

Thanks Annis I've put it on my wish list and (woohoo) it's in the library catalog when I'm ready.
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be


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