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Engish Civil War

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Thu October 21st, 2010, 8:06 pm

"Misfit" wrote:I loved the prose/writing style a great deal.


I do too!!! That is a lot of what reminds me of Jane Eyre; her style makes me think of Charlotte Bronte had she written in the 1980s.

I am really, really liking this book.....

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Sun October 24th, 2010, 12:51 pm

I did a really rather foolish thing this week and paid the absolutely stupid 2nd-hand price for Riley's Marigold Chain which I haven't read since it was first published.

When I do stupid things like that they usually get re-issued at a sensible price so you can but hope.

However, it will make a very light read for me when I am Dunnett'd.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sun October 24th, 2010, 1:45 pm

"SGM" wrote:I did a really rather foolish thing this week and paid the absolutely stupid 2nd-hand price for Riley's Marigold Chain which I haven't read since it was first published.

When I do stupid things like that they usually get re-issued at a sensible price so you can but hope.

However, it will make a very light read for me when I am Dunnett'd.


Yes, but then we'll all benefit it they get republished. It's a public service you've done ;)

If it isn't too much trouble and you have a jacket description could you bang it out for me? Book without descriptions at Goodreads drive me nuts, so when I can I like to add them.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Sun October 24th, 2010, 3:44 pm

Image

"SHE WAS THE MOST AMAZING PRIZE.....

Rather than pass another night in her dissolute brother's household, Chloe Ashton accepted the stranger who had won her at cards. But marriage to the charming Alex Deveril had more than its share of problems. Caught up in a dangerous political intrigue, still suffering from rejected love, Alex had little time to spare his unknown bridge.

But Chloe was no demure miss to sit meekly at home over her embroidery. Stung by her husband's indifference, she determined to make her own fortune -- and regain her lost independence. All in all, it was anything but a marriage of convenience.

THE MARIGOLD CHAIN

a richly unforgettable saga of intrigue, treachery and love."

I actually rather like the cover. My public spirit is tempered by my own desire to have the final instalment published.

I have some Jane Lane's somewhere that have no descriptions or covers in Goodreads, I will let you have them too (after I have finished Checkmate).
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sun October 24th, 2010, 4:43 pm

Thanks for that.

PS, it's fairly easy to apply for and obtain librarian status at Goodreads. I think the only real requirement is a certain # of books on your shelf. I like it as I can easily add a cover and jacket blurb without pestering someone else. There's also a librarians group where you can ask them to fix a book for you.
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
Michy
Bibliophile
Location: California

Postby Michy » Sun October 24th, 2010, 7:49 pm

Hmmmm "Chloe" strikes me as a highly unlikely name for a 17th century English miss. Sounds pretty 21st century American. :)

SGM
Compulsive Reader

Postby SGM » Sun October 24th, 2010, 7:56 pm

"Michy" wrote:Hmmmm "Chloe" strikes me as a highly unlikely name for a 17th century English miss. Sounds pretty 21st century American. :)


Current popularity notwithstanding the name apparently, comes from Greek and as an English name, Chloe has been in use since the Protestant Reformation (from where it doubtless got to the US). It fits in pretty nicely with the story in which there is also a French element.
Last edited by SGM on Sun October 24th, 2010, 8:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

User avatar
Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Sun October 24th, 2010, 8:02 pm

The name appears in a poem written by the Earl of Rochester ("Letter from Artemisia in the Towne to Chloe in the Country"), dated 1679.

That's one of the Stella Riley novels I don't own. It would be nice to see them reissued, but that may be asking too much.

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Postby Vanessa » Sun October 24th, 2010, 9:06 pm

Chloe is my daughter's name. Unfortunately I called her that just before it had a big revival in the UK in the late 1990s and then every man and his dog seemed to be called it!! :( However, I do still think it's a pretty name. It means 'little shoot' in Greek (as SGM points out its origin) - I remember going to Greece on holiday when she was a little girl and a waiter pointed this fact out to her. She's always remembered it. :)

To me it sounds quite French!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Mon October 25th, 2010, 3:33 am

Chloe is a name from Greek mythology (it is attached to Demeter, Goddess of the Earth, Agriculture, Harvest, and Forests), and would have been familiar to all those English aristocrats trained in the classics at school. It was also used in a romantic ancient Greek narrative called Daphnis and Chloe

Funnily enough given its pagan origins, it apparently became a popular Puritan name in the 17th century.
Last edited by annis on Mon October 25th, 2010, 3:41 am, edited 1 time in total.


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