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What Are You Reading? November 2011

Posted: Tue November 1st, 2011, 1:11 pm
by boswellbaxter
I'm reading Thomas Cromwell: The Rise and Fall of Henry VIII's Most Faithful Servant by John Schofield. I'm still reading Lionheart on my Kindle.

Posted: Tue November 1st, 2011, 2:51 pm
by fljustice
Finished my research books The Gods of the Celts by Miranda Green and The Boudican Revolt Against Rome by Paul R. Sealey and moving on to those timeless epics Ancient Farming and Architecture in Roman Britain.

Posted: Tue November 1st, 2011, 6:10 pm
by Misfit
The Prince of Eden by Marilyn Harris. Dang,this is one seriously disfunctional family. Already had cameo appearances from Charles Dickens and Jane Bronte.

Posted: Wed November 2nd, 2011, 2:44 am
by Alisha Marie Klapheke
[quote=""fljustice""]Finished my research books The Gods of the Celts by Miranda Green and The Boudican Revolt Against Rome by Paul R. Sealey and moving on to those timeless epics Ancient Farming and Architecture in Roman Britain.[/quote]

Do you find yourself agreeing with Green's theories/conclusions about the Celts? I'm researching them as well and I haven't read her yet.

For this thread: I'm reading Quiver by Stephanie Spinner. Love her writing.

Posted: Wed November 2nd, 2011, 9:22 pm
by princess garnet
Starting Spellweaver by Lynn Kurland (romance fantasy novel)
Latest installment in her "Nine Kingdoms" series

Ongoing: Black Lamb & Grey Falcon by Dame Rebecca West

Posted: Thu November 3rd, 2011, 3:45 am
by Berengaria
I'm re-reading BB's Stolen CrownI am now on a War of Roses kick after reading a series of EC's books about Norman England.

Posted: Thu November 3rd, 2011, 5:47 am
by Nefret
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Posted: Thu November 3rd, 2011, 12:23 pm
by Carine
The Leopard Unleashed by Elizabeth Chadwick

Posted: Thu November 3rd, 2011, 3:34 pm
by fljustice
[quote=""Alisha Marie Klapheke""]Do you find yourself agreeing with Green's theories/conclusions about the Celts? I'm researching them as well and I haven't read her yet.[/quote]

I found her writing very conservative, which is a good thing in history. She stuck very close to describing the archaeology/artifacts/place names, giving less credence to the primary sources (all Roman and some not contemporary), and even less to the Irish and Welsh folklore. She doesn't extrapolate much beyond the data and refuses to speculate on ritual. The tone of the writing is dense and dull, but the information solid.

Posted: Sat November 5th, 2011, 3:03 pm
by Susan
The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman

This book was highly recommended by Sharon Kay Penman at her recent reading and book signing that I attended. It's about the events at Masada told from the point of view of four women. I read a small bit so far and the writing is exquisite.