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What are you reading October 2011?

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wendy
Compulsive Reader
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Joined: September 2010
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
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Post by wendy » Wed October 5th, 2011, 2:37 pm

Larry McMurtry's "Lonesome Dove" - what a great read.
I'm really enjoying the style, and the book is so much more fun than the movie!
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com

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Brenna
Bibliophile
Posts: 1358
Joined: June 2010
Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Wed October 5th, 2011, 7:18 pm

[quote=""boswellbaxter""]I'm still reading Mary I by John Edwards, and am also reading The Reluctant Queen by Geraldine Evans (HF about Mary, Henry VIII's sister).[/quote]

And what do you think of The Reluctant Queen? I think I added that one to my TBR pile...but I can't remember. Oh boy the books are all starting to bleed together!
Brenna

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boswellbaxter
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Location: North Carolina
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Post by boswellbaxter » Wed October 5th, 2011, 7:36 pm

[quote=""Brenna""]And what do you think of The Reluctant Queen? I think I added that one to my TBR pile...but I can't remember. Oh boy the books are all starting to bleed together![/quote]

I finished it at lunch. It was pretty bad, I'm afraid. I'll try to post the review here later, but in the meantime, here's a link:

http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/219315022
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Posts: 3557
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu October 6th, 2011, 4:38 am

I'm reading NF -- Modoc: the true story of the greatest elephant who ever lived by Ralph Helfer. I have a thing for elephants.

annis
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Posts: 4585
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Post by annis » Thu October 6th, 2011, 6:09 am

Posted by MLE
I'm reading NF -- Modoc: the true story of the greatest elephant who ever lived by Ralph Helfer. I have a thing for elephants.
Aah - that a wonderful story, but so sad.... I think it' s probably best described as faction.

Currently reading Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell,a contemporary adult/YA novel set in the Appalachians. Powerful, bleak and beautifully written. I believe it's been made into a movie which I'd like to see now.
Last edited by annis on Fri October 7th, 2011, 5:43 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Vanessa
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Posts: 4187
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Thu October 6th, 2011, 8:41 am

[quote=""MLE""]I'm reading NF -- Modoc: the true story of the greatest elephant who ever lived by Ralph Helfer. I have a thing for elephants.[/quote]

So do I! :) I have loads of elephant ornaments dotted round my house, plus jewellery. I have a lovely 2ft tall wooden Ganesha which I bought in Goa.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Madeleine
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Posts: 5664
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: "The Corset" by Laura Purcell
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Thu October 6th, 2011, 11:30 am

[quote=""annis""]Posted by MLE


Aah - that a wonderful story, but so sad.... I think it' s probably best described as faction.

Currently reading Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell,a contemporary adult/YA contemporary novel set in the Appalachians. Powerful, bleak and beautifully written. I believe it's been made into a movie which I'd like to see now.[/quote]

Yes it was made into a movie a couple of years ago or so and was highly acclaimed, I think the young actress was Oscar-nominated.
Currently reading "The Corset" by Laura Purcell

Ash
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Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Thu October 6th, 2011, 1:23 pm

Reading Lionheart is helping bring together all the connections that have been nebulus in my knowledge of world history in that time period. Globalization has always been with us, in one way or another....

Thinking that Alys, Constance and Joanna are the most tragic figures in this story (haven't finished yet). They certainly represent what women were forced into during that time period. As much as I love reading about the middle ages, I am glad I live in this century!

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Nefret
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Posts: 2970
Joined: February 2009
Favourite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Post by Nefret » Thu October 6th, 2011, 1:24 pm

Cleopatra by Stacy Schiff
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Brenna
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Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Thu October 6th, 2011, 2:10 pm

[quote=""Ash""]Reading Lionheart is helping bring together all the connections that have been nebulus in my knowledge of world history in that time period. Globalization has always been with us, in one way or another....

Thinking that Alys, Constance and Joanna are the most tragic figures in this story (haven't finished yet). They certainly represent what women were forced into during that time period. As much as I love reading about the middle ages, I am glad I live in this century![/quote]

We should start a buddy read for everyone lucky enough to have it in their little hands now!
Brenna

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