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November 2009: What are you Reading?

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diamondlil
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November 2009: What are you Reading?

Post by diamondlil » Sun November 1st, 2009, 12:41 am

Share your November reads in this thread.
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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emr
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Post by emr » Sun November 1st, 2009, 10:55 am

Inés de Portugal by João Aguiar
The book narrates the life of Inés de Castro http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In%C3%AAs_de_Castro from the pov of Alvaro Pais, Pedro I's canciller. She was queen of Portugal after her own death executed by order of Afonso IV.
"So many books, so little time."
— Frank Zappa

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Sun November 1st, 2009, 7:27 pm

I started reading A Guide to the Birds of East Africa by Nicholas Drayson yesterday. It is set in Kenya and has a bit of an Alexander McCall Smith feel to it, but with a bit more of an edge. I am enjoying it a lot.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sun November 1st, 2009, 7:59 pm

The Players: A Novel of the Young Shakespeare by Stephanie Cowell. I'm 62 pages in and really enjoying her characterization of WS and his friends, as well as her descriptions of London.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sun November 1st, 2009, 8:46 pm

The Black Swan by Day Taylor. Supposedly a Civil War Romance, but there's a lot more history than romance (a good thing).
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Post by Ash » Sun November 1st, 2009, 9:24 pm

Still reading Wolf Hall. Trying to read a few others during breaks, but nothing is clicking while I am into this book.

CindyInOz
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Post by CindyInOz » Mon November 2nd, 2009, 12:09 am

I'm about 80 pages into Dorothy Dunnett's Niccolo Rising - gosh it's a complex read, and not one I'll be able to read late at night, but I'm enjoying it so far.

I'm also about to start Guy Gavriel Kay's The Last Light of the Sun. I'm hoping that will be more of a relaxing late night read than Dunnett. Has anyone read it recently? I've heard good things about it and having just finished Cornwell's The Burning Land I now need to get my Viking fix from elsewhere!

annis
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Post by annis » Mon November 2nd, 2009, 2:00 am

Posted by CindyInOz
I'm also about to start Guy Gavriel Kay's The Last Light of the Sun. I'm hoping that will be more of a relaxing late night read than Dunnett. Has anyone read it recently? I've heard good things about it and having just finished Cornwell's The Burning Land I now need to get my Viking fix from elsewhere!
I read and enjoyed “Last Light of the Sun” when it first came out several years ago. In one of those weird synchronistic literary impulses, it came out at exactly the same time as Bernard Cornwell’s “Last Kingdom”, which may have affected its sales. I mean, what are the odds- hardly anyone touches the subject of King Alfred since the Victorians went medieval-mad, and then two novels about him come out together? It’s happening at the moment too, with several novels about the English Civil War and a couple featuring Robin Hood all out simultaneously. And when I read Tracy Chevalier’s “Remarkable Creatures” I noticed her wry comment that she discovered another author was working on a book about Mary Anning just as she was about to publish her one!

I found “Last Kingdom” and “Last Light of the Sun” perfectly complementary, as they present light and dark images of King Alfred. Bernard Cornwell makes him something of an anti-hero, while GGK has created his version in the traditional heroic mould.

Currently reading a ripping blood & guts yarn set in Roman Britain during the reign of Emperor Commodius (of “Gladiator” notoriety)- Anthony Riches, “Wounds of Honour”

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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Mon November 2nd, 2009, 2:03 am

I, Jacqueline by Hilda Lewis

CindyInOz
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Post by CindyInOz » Mon November 2nd, 2009, 2:20 am

[quote=""annis""]

Currently reading a ripping blood & guts yarn set in Roman Britain during the reign of Emperor Commodius (of “Gladiator” notoriety)- Anthony Riches, “Wounds of Honour”[/quote]

That one sounds like my cup of tea! Please do let me know what you think of it Annis.

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