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Forthcoming Books: 2011 Edition

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Mon August 9th, 2010, 10:45 am

Think I prefer the UK version, definitely has a mystery feel to it and certainly has a more masculine image too, it would catch my eye that's for sure.

Not too keen on the US version, what is the orangey thing in the foreground? On my screen it looks a bit like a fish!
Currently reading: "The Comforts of Home" by Susan Hill

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Mon August 9th, 2010, 10:50 am

I prefer the USA cover but they do look as if they are appealing to different markets as opposed to different countries. The UK one looks like a mystery/thriller/whodunnit whereas the USA one says historical novel with a touch of romance. The USA cover is woman-centric. The UK looks to me as if it's geared to a male audience. Very interesting. Thanks C.W. I find the psychology of the book cover endlessly fascinating!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon August 9th, 2010, 2:04 pm

I like both covers, Christopher, but they're clearly and cannily aimed at different audiences. I'm sure your publishers know what they're doing and it looks very calculated. The UK one seems very 'now', to capture that huge adventure/history/thriller thing that's going on that is clearly aimed at a male audience: Steve Berry, Tom Harper, Paul Sussman etc. But I'm sure the inclusion of 'Tudor' in the title will bring in the female readership too.

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cw gortner
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Post by cw gortner » Mon August 9th, 2010, 5:53 pm

[quote=""EC2""]I find the psychology of the book cover endlessly fascinating![/quote]

Thanks to everyone for your comments and feedback! I also find this book cover stuff fascinating.

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]IThe UK one seems very 'now', to capture that huge adventure/history/thriller thing that's going on that is clearly aimed at a male audience: Steve Berry, Tom Harper, Paul Sussman etc. But I'm sure the inclusion of 'Tudor' in the title will bring in the female readership too.[/quote]

Oh, my. If I get Steve Berry's sales, I'll be a very happy writer, indeed :)
THE QUEEN'S VOW available on June 12, 2012!
THE TUDOR SECRET, Book I in the Elizabeth I Spymaster Chronicles
THE CONFESSIONS OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI
THE LAST QUEEN


www.cwgortner.com

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Post by gyrehead » Wed August 11th, 2010, 4:21 pm

[quote=""Tanzanite""]Livia: Empress of Rome by Matthew Dennison. Non-fiction. US and UK release January 4, 2011. Livia, Empress of Rome tells the story of one of the most fascinating, perplexing, and powerful figures of the ancient world: the empress Livia. Second wife of the emperor Augustus and the mother of his successor Tiberius, Livia has been vilified by posterity (most notably by Tacitus and Robert Graves) as the quintessence of the scheming Roman matriarch, poisoning her relatives one by one to smooth her son’s path to the imperial throne. In this elegant and rigorously researched biography, Matthew Dennison rescues the historical Livia from this crudely drawn caricature of the popular imagination. He depicts a complex, courageous and richly gifted woman whose true crime was not murder but the exercise of power, and who, in a male-dominated society, had the energy to create for herself both a prominent public profile and a significant sphere of political influence.[/quote]

I'm a bit worried about a historian that calls Livia the second wife of Augustus.

[quote=""Tanzanite""]From Splendour to Revolution: The Romanov Women 1847-1928 by Julia Gelardi. Non-fiction. US and UK release February 15, 2011. This sweeping saga recreates the extraordinary opulence and violence of Tsarist Russia as the shadow of revolution fell over the land, and destroyed a way of life for these Imperial women The early 1850s until the late 1920s marked a turbulent and significant era for Russia. During that time the country underwent a massive transformation, taking it from days of grandeur under the tsars to the chaos of revolution and the beginnings of the Soviet Union. At the center of all this tumult were four women of the Romanov dynasty. Marie Alexandrovna and Olga Constantinovna were born into the family, Russian Grand Duchesses at birth. Marie Feodorovna and Marie Pavlovna married into the dynasty, the former born a Princess of Denmark, the latter a Duchess of the German duchy of Mecklendburg-Schwerin. In From Splendor to Revolution, we watch these pampered aristocratic women fight for their lives as the cataclysm of war engulfs them. In a matter of a few short years, they fell from the pinnacle of wealth and power to the depths of danger, poverty, and exile. It is an unforgettable epic story.[/quote]

This one has me intrigued.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Wed August 11th, 2010, 9:00 pm

[quote=""gyrehead""]I'm a bit worried about a historian that calls Livia the second wife of Augustus.[/quote]

I think you can't (necessarily) blame the author for any errors in the book's blurb. He probably wouldn't have written it himself.

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Post by Tanzanite » Wed August 11th, 2010, 9:05 pm

In the Shadow of the Lamp by Susanne Dunlap. Young Adult. US release April 12, 2011. A young nurse—in love with two men—joins Florence Nightingale on the field of battle. It’s 1854 and sixteen-year-old Molly would give anything to change her circumstances as a lowly servant in a posh London house. So when she hears of an opportunity to join the nurses who will be traveling with Florence Nightingale to the Crimea, she jumps at the chance. The work is grueling, the hospital conditions deplorable, and Miss Nightingale a demanding teacher. Before long, the plight of British soldiers becomes more than just a mission of mercy as Molly finds that she’s falling in love with both a dashing young doctor and a soldier who has joined the army to be near her. But with the battle raging ever nearer, can Molly keep the two men she cares for from harm? A love story to savor, and a fascinating behind-the-scenes imagining of the woman who became known as “the lady with the lamp.”
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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed August 11th, 2010, 9:08 pm

A Place Called Armageddon by C.C. Humphreys. UK release April 21, 2011.

To the Greeks who love it, it is Constantinople. To the Turks who covet it, the Red Apple. Safe behind its magnificent walls, the city was once the heart of the vast Byzantine empire. 1453. The empire has shrunk to what lies within those now-crumbling walls. A relic. Yet for one man, Constantinople is the stepping stone to destiny. Mehmet is twenty when he is annointed Sultan. Now, seeking Allah's will and Man's glory, he brings an army of one hundred thousand, outnumbering the defenders ten to one. He has also brings something new - the most frightening weapon the world has ever seen... And yet, through seven weeks of sea battles, night battles, by tunnel and tower, the defence holds... and will until the final assault and a single bullet that will change history. But a city is more than stone, its fate inseparable from that of its people. Men - like Gregoras, a mercenary and exile, returning to the hated place he once loved. Like his twin and betrayer, the subtle diplomat, Theon. Sofia, loved by two brothers but forced to make a desperate choice between them. And Leilah, a powerful mystic and assassin, seeking her own destiny in the flames. This is the tale of one of history's greatest battles for one of the world's most extraordinary places. This is the story of people, from peasant to emperor - with the city's fate, and theirs, undecided... until the moment the Red Apple falls.

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michellemoran
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Post by michellemoran » Wed August 11th, 2010, 9:28 pm

Tanzanite - how do you find all of this?!!!! You're amazing. I definitely want to read A PLACE CALLED ARMAGEDDON.
Visit MichelleMoran.com
Check out Michelle's blog History Buff at michellemoran.blogspot.com

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Thu August 12th, 2010, 2:50 pm

Tanzanite-

Do you know if that one will have U.S release as well? Like Michelle, I'm intrigued!
Brenna

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