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July 2009: What are you Reading?

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annis
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Post by annis » Sun July 19th, 2009, 8:35 am

"Hodd" by Adam Thorpe. Robin Hood as you've never seen him! A brilliant evocation of a medieval mindset.

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Sun July 19th, 2009, 11:50 am

Finger Lickin' Fifteen by Janet Evanovich. When I finish that I have to choose between Grave Good by Ariana Franklin, The Dark Rose by Cynthia Harrod Eagles or The Rosary Girls by Richard Montanari. I am leaning towards The Dark Rose.
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Alaric
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Post by Alaric » Sun July 19th, 2009, 4:07 pm

Still reading A Clash of Kings. In fact, I haven't read much of it ... I've had other things to do in the last week or so and haven't done a whole lot of reading, so I'm only about 150pg in.

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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Sun July 19th, 2009, 8:35 pm

I've finished up Jude Morgan's The Taste of Sorrow (review forthcoming on my blog) and just started Maggie Anton's Rashi's Daughters: Joheved.

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Leo62
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Post by Leo62 » Sun July 19th, 2009, 8:37 pm

[quote=""annis""]"Hodd" by Adam Thorpe. Robin Hood as you've never seen him! A brilliant evocation of a medieval mindset.[/quote]
Just finished this. It really gets the whole religious thing doesn't it? But what do you think about the footnotes? :eek: :p

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Telynor
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Location: On the Banks of the Hudson

Post by Telynor » Sun July 19th, 2009, 8:50 pm

Finally got done with What Would Jane Austen Do? Very silly, very fluffy and well, I didn't care for it much... Now onto either another Ann Rule anthology or Girl in a Blue Dress.

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Sun July 19th, 2009, 9:15 pm

Just finished Elizabeth Chadwick's The Greatest Knight and am about to start Karen Maitland's Company of Liars.
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Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Sun July 19th, 2009, 11:36 pm

I just finished Michelle's "Cleopatra's Daughter", and am now nearly finished with a very thin but very brilliant and fascinating book about the uses and abuses of history by Margaret Macmillan. Highly, highly recommended. I also picked up a copy of Jeanne Kalogridis's book about Catherine de Medici yesterday -- look forward to comparing it with what CW will be coming out with in the new year!

Ash
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Post by Ash » Mon July 20th, 2009, 12:31 am

[quote=""Chatterbox""]I just finished Michelle's "Cleopatra's Daughter", and am now nearly finished with a very thin but very brilliant and fascinating book about the uses and abuses of history by Margaret Macmillan. Highly, highly recommended. ![/quote]

Sounds interesting - whats it called?

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Mon July 20th, 2009, 12:55 am

The title is "Dangerous Games". It's very thoughtful -- she is drawing on all the history she knows (emphasis on the 19th/20th centuries, not surprisingly) to make her case. The result is not only a compelling argument, but an important one, IMO.

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