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Which book should be August 2009 Book of the Month?

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Which book should be Book of the Month for August 2009?

The Virgin's Daughters: In the Court of Elizabeth I by Jeane Westin
4
14%
The Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden
1
4%
Mudbound by Hillary Jordan
0
No votes
The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber
5
18%
Company of Liars by Karen Maitland
15
54%
Kathryn in the Court of Six Queens by Anne Merton Abbey
3
11%
 
Total votes: 28

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diamondlil
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Which book should be August 2009 Book of the Month?

Post by diamondlil » Thu June 25th, 2009, 9:39 am

Voting will close on 30 June 2009.


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The Virgin's Daughters: In the Court of Elizabeth I by Jeane Westin

The story of Elizabeth I, as it’s never been told before—through the eyes of two ladies-in-waiting closest to her…

In a court filled with repressed sexual longing, scandal, and intrigue, Lady Katherine Grey is Elizabeth’s most faithful servant. When the young queen is smitten by the dashing Robert Dudley, Katherine must choose between duty and desire—as her secret passion for a handsome earl threatens to turn Elizabeth against her. Once the queen becomes a bitter and capricious monarch, another lady-in-waiting, Mistress Mary Rogers, offers the queen comfort. But even Mary cannot remain impervious to the court’s sexual tension—and as Elizabeth gives her doomed heart to the mercurial Earl of Essex, Mary is drawn to the queen’s rakish godson… (416 pages)

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The Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden

In this powerful and mesmerizing debut, Joseph Boyden reinvents the tradition of Great War epics like All Quiet on the Western Front and Birdsong. It is 1919 and Niska, an Oji- Cree medicine woman, has left her home in the bush of northern Ontario to retrieve Xavier Bird, her only relation, who has returned from the trenches of Europe. Gravely wounded and addicted to morphine, Xavier recounts how he and his best friend, Elijah Whiskeyjack, prowled the battlefields as snipers of enormous skill—and how the circumstances of their deadly craft led them to very different fates. Told with unblinking focus, this is a stunning tale of brutality, survival, and rebirth that marks the arrival of a prodigious new talent. (368 pages)

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Mudbound by Hillary Jordan


In Jordan's prize-winning debut, prejudice takes many forms, both subtle and brutal. It is 1946, and city-bred Laura McAllan is trying to raise her children on her husband's Mississippi Delta farm—a place she finds foreign and frightening. In the midst of the family's struggles, two young men return from the war to work the land. Jamie McAllan, Laura's brother-in-law, is everything her husband is not—charming, handsome, and haunted by his memories of combat. Ronsel Jackson, eldest son of the black sharecroppers who live on the McAllan farm, has come home with the shine of a war hero. But no matter his bravery in defense of his country, he is still considered less than a man in the Jim Crow South. It is the unlikely friendship of these brothers-in-arms that drives this powerful novel to its inexorable conclusion.

The men and women of each family relate their versions of events and we are drawn into their lives as they become players in a tragedy on the grandest scale. As Kingsolver says of Hillary Jordan, "Her characters walked straight out of 1940s Mississippi and into the part of my brain where sympathy and anger and love reside, leaving my heart racing. They are with me still." (340 pages)


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The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber

Meet Sugar, a nineteen-year-old prostitute in nineteenth-century London who yearns for escape to a better life. From the brothel of the terrifying Mrs. Castaway, she begins her ascent through society, meeting a host of lovable, maddening, unforgettable characters on the way. They begin with William Rackham, an egotistical perfume magnate whose empire is fueled by his lust for Sugar; his unhinged, child-like wife Agnes; his mysteriously hidden-away daughter, Sophie; and his pious brother Henry, foiled in his devotional calling by a persistently less-than-chaste love for the Widow Fox. All this is overseen by assorted preening socialites, drunken journalists, untrustworthy servants, vile guttersnipes, and whores of all stripes and persuasions.
Teeming with life, this is a big, juicy must-read of a novel that has enthralled hundreds of thousands of readers-and will continue to do so for years to come.

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Company of Liars by Karen Maitland


EMBARK ON A TURBULENT JOURNEY THROUGH A RAVAGED COUNTRYSIDE . . . WITH ONLY LIARS FOR COMPANY.

The year is 1348. In a world ruled by faith and fear, nine desperate strangers, brought together by chance, attempt to flee the certain death that is rolling inexorably toward them. Each traveler has a hidden gift, a dark secret, and a story to tell….

From Camelot, the relic-seller, to Cygnus, the one-armed storyteller—from the strange, silent child Narigorm to a painter and his pregnant wife, each guards secrets closely. None are as they seem. And one among them conceals the darkest secret of all—propelling these liars to a destiny more perilous than any of them could imagine. (480 pages)


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Kathryn in the Court of Six Queens by Anne Merton Abbey

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Thu June 25th, 2009, 9:42 am

There was no blurb on Amazon for Kathryn in the Court of Six Queens, so if anyone has one please post it in the thread and I will add it to the above post.
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Thu June 25th, 2009, 11:41 am

Amazon link for Kathryn here. It looks like the cheap copies have been snapped up again.
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu June 25th, 2009, 6:05 pm

I'm Tudor'd out. Besides, Legacy was so excellent, it makes the other stuff look trivial.

Stuff in the 20th century doesn't feel like HF to me.

So it was between the Crimson Petal and the White, and Company of Liars. I picked the latter because it deals with the plague, which interests me.
Last edited by MLE (Emily Cotton) on Thu June 25th, 2009, 6:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Leo62
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Post by Leo62 » Thu June 25th, 2009, 7:09 pm

[quote=""MLE""]
So it was between the Crimson Petal and the White, and Company of Liars. I picked the latter because it deals with the plague, which interests me.[/quote]

That was my reason for reading Company too, but unfortunately the plague doesn't get much of a look-in.

Looks like it's going to win by a country mile. :eek:

Not that I'm bitter or anything. :D

chuck
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Post by chuck » Thu June 25th, 2009, 11:56 pm

Shoot!....How did I miss this months selections?...............

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri June 26th, 2009, 1:08 am

I think its pretty obvious Company is going to win this month. Not my type of book so I'll pass again on BOTM.
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Fri June 26th, 2009, 11:44 pm

Wow! We haven't had this much of a one sided vote for ages and ages.
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Wed July 1st, 2009, 10:50 am

The clear winner this month, with over 50% of the vote, is Company of Liars by Karen Maitland!

Thanks for participating everyone!
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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