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Southern Spain

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Helen_Davis

Southern Spain

Post by Helen_Davis » Sun December 2nd, 2012, 3:44 pm

I was thinking about France and Israel in a previous thread, but I kind of feel an inner voice warning me to stay away from both places-- not forever, just for now. I have always been interested in Spain and loved my 2006 trip there so I wanted to know-- is Spain safe to visit now?

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Sun December 2nd, 2012, 5:11 pm

I would think Israel might be a bit unstable at the moment, but can't see any problems with France or Spain, not as far as I know - work colleagues regularly visit France and never have any trouble.
Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston.

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Antoine Vanner
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Travelling in France or Spain or anywhere else

Post by Antoine Vanner » Sun December 2nd, 2012, 10:46 pm

[quote=""Helen_Davis""]I was thinking about France and Israel in a previous thread, but I kind of feel an inner voice warning me to stay away from both places-- not forever, just for now. I have always been interested in Spain and loved my 2006 trip there so I wanted to know-- is Spain safe to visit now?[/quote]

Of course France and Spain in general are safe to travel in. I do so regularly. But no matter where you travel to observe the Golden Rule "Don't go to the sort of areas you would steer clear of in your own country". In every country in the world - including your own - there are places you would steer clear of - so do the same when abroad.

If in doubt ask advice from front-desk staff at your hotel and you'll almost certainly get good advice. As I've visited over 50 countries, lived long-term in 8 and did shorter jobs in some 20 others, including many with serious security problems, I've found that common sense of this nature serves one very well.

Helen_Davis

Post by Helen_Davis » Sun December 2nd, 2012, 11:50 pm

Great! Can someone give me some heads up on the best parts of Southern Spain? I am interested in the things connected to Isabella's life in particular

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Mon December 3rd, 2012, 10:07 am

Yes, Antoine's advice is spot on. Most visitors to cities are advised that petty theft ie pick-pocketing, bag-snatching, is the biggest risk - especially on public transport, so just use common sense really - don't carry lots of money, or leave valuables eg cameras, i-pods etc on display, and don't go anywhere that looks a bit grotty or where there aren't too many people about. Pretty much the same rules as if you were visiting a large city in your own country.
Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston.

Helen_Davis

Post by Helen_Davis » Mon December 3rd, 2012, 8:53 pm

I think I'm scared of traveling because I'm an American and I'm afraid Europeans will automatically assume I'm an idiot and give me grief and treat me badly-- at least based on the comments of some Europeans on YouTube who assume I'm stupid because I'm an American. This is why I hate stereotypes :mad:

Of course, I'm very feisty and would give it right back to them, but I like to be a polite person and make friends when I travel. I had no problems in Spain in 2006 or in Argentina in 2007 or 2009.
Last edited by Helen_Davis on Mon December 3rd, 2012, 10:13 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Tue December 4th, 2012, 10:22 am

Then just be friendly and pleasant - you say you've travelled before without any trouble. Don't take any notice of the nonsense people post on YouTube.
Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston.

Helen_Davis

Post by Helen_Davis » Wed December 5th, 2012, 1:53 am

[quote=""Madeleine""]Then just be friendly and pleasant - you say you've travelled before without any trouble. Don't take any notice of the nonsense people post on YouTube.[/quote]

Yeah, YouTube is full of 5 year olds. Or 30 year olds who act like they're 5!

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Antoine Vanner
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Justifiable Pride

Post by Antoine Vanner » Fri December 7th, 2012, 9:40 pm

[quote=""Helen_Davis""]I think I'm scared of traveling because I'm an American and I'm afraid Europeans will automatically assume I'm an idiot and give me grief and treat me badly-- at least based on the comments of some Europeans on YouTube who assume I'm stupid because I'm an American. This is why I hate stereotypes :mad:

Of course, I'm very feisty and would give it right back to them, but I like to be a polite person and make friends when I travel. I had no problems in Spain in 2006 or in Argentina in 2007 or 2009.[/quote]

Dear Helen:

Just be proud to be an American anywhere you travel in Europe!

I'm not an American myself but I know that huge cemeteries in Europe are filled with Americans who gave their lives to liberate peoples who in some cases didn't have the gumption to resist Nazi tyranny in the first place and who in many cases collaborated enthusiastically and profitably with the occupiers.

"For Our Tomorrow they gave Their Today".

This applies in much of Western Europe.

And there's nothing stupid about a nation that put men on the Moon and has been at the forefront of scientific and technological development for well over a century. So hold your head up as an American in Europe.

If you do go to Southern Spain then you'll need to see the Alhambra in Granada. Cordoba and Seville are also unmissable and I personally like Cadiz also, though that more of an acquired taste.

Lisbon and environs (Belem, Mafra, Cintra etc) is well worth a visit, though many miss it as being a little off the usual tourist routes.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Fri December 7th, 2012, 11:13 pm

Andalusia is the best part of Spain, IMHO. Toledo is worth a whole week. Also Granada and Malaga. Everybody we crossed in Adalusia was wonderfully gracious, actually so pleased with the tourism.

And of course, the Alhambra is to die for. Also Toledo's old city. If you have the time, visit some of the villages in the Alpujarra--Trevelez is the highest municipality in Spain.

Barcelona -- in fact all of Catalonia -- had a whole different atmosphere. They seem to still be carrying a chip on their shoulder over Franco. And if you communicate in Spanish, you get the cold shoulder. "Excuse me, we speak Catalan now."

Not that my Spanish is all that great. But my friend, who was raised in Barcelona, was so annoyed that she could hardly wait to get out of there.

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