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outlander series

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Tue December 29th, 2009, 8:04 pm

[quote=""Anna Elliott""]Claire is 27 at the beginning of Outlander, she turns 28 about halfway through (on Oct. 20th, to be exact).

I wasn't particularly bothered by the spanking, either, but interestingly enough my husband was when he read it. Or rather, not exactly bothered as in offended but thought the way the whole scene played out was inconsistent with everything else that had been established about Jamie's character. He also thought Jamie was a slightly unconvincing guy--as in, he could tell that Jamie had been constructed by a female author. Since Outlander is one of my favorite books and Jamie one of my favorite characters, I thought that was really interesting.[/quote]

One of the blokes that I used to work with has a partner, sister, and work colleagues who love this series, but whenever we started to talk about it, he would start going on about how stupid the main character was (as in Jamie). After we all finished being flabbergasted, he could explain that Jamie must be stupid because otherwise how can all the things that keep happening to him keep happening to him.
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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Posts: 3554
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat January 2nd, 2010, 3:51 pm

Well, the boook picked up nicely during the witch trials, but I must confess that the looong descriptions set at the family homestead actually put me to sleep while listening. I have a new iPod nano which I have yet to learn the settings of, so I can only advance/retreat one chunk at a time, according to audible's random divisions to the story. And I simply will NOT listen to that part again to pick up where I snoozed. But the jump forward puts me with Jaime being captured. How far do I need to retreat?
(This is where a physical copy of the book would be really handy.)
Maybe what I should be reading is the ipod instructions, but 'nano' is a good description of the print size, which is about -4 points.

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Anna Elliott
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Post by Anna Elliott » Sat January 2nd, 2010, 6:19 pm

That's so interesting, MLE, because the section at Lallybroch is actually my favorite of the book. But Jamie is captured at the end of that section--he and Ian are ambushed by the Watch while on an errand--so if you want to skip over the Lallybroch bit entirely you don't have to back up.

Author of the Twilight of Avalon trilogy
new book: Dark Moon of Avalon, coming Sept 14 from Simon &Schuster (Touchstone)

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Anna Elliott
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Post by Anna Elliott » Sat January 2nd, 2010, 6:21 pm

Oh, but forgot to say that I was reading as opposed to listening on audiobook. I did try the audiobook later, but wasn't such a fan of the reader. Somehow it took the magic out of it for me. So maybe I'd not have enjoyed the Lallybroch section as much if I'd been listening.

Author of the Twilight of Avalon trilogy
new book: Dark Moon of Avalon, coming Sept 14 from Simon &Schuster (Touchstone)

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Posts: 3554
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat January 2nd, 2010, 9:11 pm

Yes, I do have that issue with audiobooks as well. Sometimes descriptions which would not bore me to read seem irritatingly long when narrated. I suppose it is because I can adjust the speed at which I read, but short of making the voice-actor sound like Mickey Mouse, you just have to plod through the descriptions at whatever speed they choose to read it. When Jenny is describing being pregnant, the book slowed down -- no doubt to give the emotion, as the narrator gave her a quiet, dreamy sort of voice -- and I felt like fast-forwarding through the whole description.
Come to think of it, maybe hearing Minnie Mouse's take on pregnancy might have been pretty funny.

I must say that I like Davina Porter's Scottish accents. But there appear to be two different readers of the books available on Audible, so I'm not sure if it's the same one you heard.
Last edited by MLE (Emily Cotton) on Sat January 2nd, 2010, 9:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Anna Elliott
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Post by Anna Elliott » Sat January 2nd, 2010, 10:37 pm

I think it was Davina Porter I listened to. But I'm not positive. I know I've listened to her reading other audiobooks, so I may be getting mixed up. I did like the Scottish accents. Claire's voice just sounded all wrong to me when I listened to it.

And I have to say that though I do love Outlander, the pregnancy description is one of my absolute least favorite parts of the book. Maybe because I've been pregnant myself twice in the last four years. Actually I probably would have had more patience for Minnie Mouse's description than Jenny's. ;)

Author of the Twilight of Avalon trilogy
new book: Dark Moon of Avalon, coming Sept 14 from Simon &Schuster (Touchstone)

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http://www.annaelliottbooks.com

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3554
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon January 4th, 2010, 7:52 pm

Now one hour from the end of a 33-hour audiobook. I like it that Gabaldon does not simply pretend that her characters have no religious thoughts, as so many writers of HF do. I liked her take on the Abbey.

My extensive reading and training in psychology (Not the stuff I learned in the 70's, but the more recent research and studies) made me absolutely squirm during Claire's method of 'healing' Jaime emotionally. SO totally off!!! But I decided to simply suspend disbelief on that. The daughter says that in the rest of the series that particular thread becomes a little more realistic; she expects Gabaldon did more research.

All in all, Gabaldon obviously sets out to evoke the reader's emotions in her writing and descriptions. For me, about half of her efforts go way over into TMI. I don't like the close descriptions of horrific tortures. I read enough of that in real-life, working with organizations from the third world.

I can do without the blow-by blow on sexual perversions. I get enough of that writing up blurbs on human trafficking; in Gabaldon, I feel she is presenting it as much to titillate as to move the plot forward, while I see faces and ruined lives of real people.

The medical descriptions don't bother me as much, although since I like my novels to move a little faster, I did feel she went on a little long over them. For adventure and dialogue, she gets high marks.

Maybe what I need is the Reader's Digest version!

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zsigandr
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Location: Ontario, Canada

Post by zsigandr » Wed January 6th, 2010, 5:46 pm

IMO, I am still wading through this one. I had heard great things from so many other readers, but I have had difficulty getting through this one.

I find it seems to be the same things over and over again and Claire, though feisty, seems way to modern in her thinking and actions. The fighting, the sex, the fighting, the sex - just seems to be repetitive.

The spanking scene didn't bother me so much as it surprised me, just different behaviour from Jaime's character than earlier on in the book.

I hope to finish this one someday as I don't want to give up on it completely, it just doesn't seem to grab me and keep my attention as other novels have.
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princess
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Post by princess » Thu January 21st, 2010, 11:14 pm

I've read all the books in the series up until the Fiery Cross (I could only get a quarter of the way through and had to stop). I've never come across books that are such slow-starters as these :eek: They only seem to get going about half way through - I really had to persevere. The stereotyping really irritated me - 18th Century Highland Scots did NOT speak like Glaswegians!!! Also, how did little old Claire manage to get to meet and become intimate with the French King!!! And of course, she retained her youthful good looks and figure into old age :rolleyes:

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Fri January 22nd, 2010, 10:45 pm

[quote=""Anna Elliott""]I think it was Davina Porter I listened to. But I'm not positive. I know I've listened to her reading other audiobooks, so I may be getting mixed up. I did like the Scottish accents. Claire's voice just sounded all wrong to me when I listened to it.

And I have to say that though I do love Outlander, the pregnancy description is one of my absolute least favorite parts of the book. Maybe because I've been pregnant myself twice in the last four years. Actually I probably would have had more patience for Minnie Mouse's description than Jenny's. ;) [/quote]

Davina Porter is generally recommended as the better reader of the two. The other narrator is for the abridged version, and of the parts i have heard, wasn't good.
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Edith Wharton

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