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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Sat May 16th, 2009, 11:21 pm

Absolutely go for it, Divia. It's called fiction for a reason. If the writing is good, no one will mind if one aspect of the plot is a bit innacurate, and as others have stated there are ways to make it work or even make it integral to the story.

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Sun May 17th, 2009, 12:01 am

[quote=""Divia""]
This isnt historically accurate. Do you think I should try the story anyway and at the end do some authors note explaining the things I fudge or do you think its so out there and so untrue that its best to be left alone?[/quote]Divia - I think it is rather historically accurate in a sense. One of my favorite elementary/middle school books as a young kid was about Florence Nightingale - I read it over and over and over ... in fact I went to nursing school for a year when I was 19. Anyhoo - she was from a rich upper class British family and when she decided to enter nursing in 1845 her parents were angered and distressed, but we know how her story turned out. Maybe your MC has been inspired by Miss Nightingale's accomplishments. Miss Nightingale even refused to be married due to her calling - she had an offer from a baron no less! Check out her experiences as a nurse during the Crimean War.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Nightengale
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