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the editing process

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Helen_Davis

the editing process

Post by Helen_Davis » Sun June 21st, 2009, 8:23 pm

I have submitted my manuscript to The Writer's Literary Agency, and I must confess, I'm a little nervous because I don't know how editing goes in the traditional publishing world. Do I do it, or does someone else?

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Sun June 21st, 2009, 11:09 pm

[quote=""Andromeda_Organa""]I have submitted my manuscript to The Writer's Literary Agency, and I must confess, I'm a little nervous because I don't know how editing goes in the traditional publishing world. Do I do it, or does someone else?[/quote]

First, The Writer's Literary Agency seems to have a dubious reputation. You might want to tread carefully, especially if they are charging a fee.

http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/sho ... hp?t=34311

As for your question, once a book is accepted by a traditional publisher, an editor will do what is called a "line edit" and discuss with you any changes that he or she feels are needed to improve the story. After you make them, a copy editor will read the manuscript, mainly for grammar and spelling and stylistic consistency. (A good copy editor will also make sure that your heroine's eyes aren't described as brown in one chapter and blue in another.)
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
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Helen_Davis

Post by Helen_Davis » Mon June 22nd, 2009, 8:33 pm

I guess I'll go with BookSurge then...

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SarahWoodbury
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Post by SarahWoodbury » Tue June 23rd, 2009, 5:53 pm

I was just wondering what you are looking for in this publishing process? Book Surge is an unedited, self-published POD, just like Lulu, right? Except Book Surge costs money upfront and Lulu doesn't?

I see you have a web page from Lulu that is empty now. Did you find that Lulu was no longer working for you? I have not tried to sell my books through their store, but have had great success making my own books and having Lulu print them. I've given them to friends and family that way and, of course, love seeing it in reall 'book form'.

I was just wondering what your thoughts were on the self-publishing route.

Helen_Davis

Post by Helen_Davis » Tue June 23rd, 2009, 8:03 pm

Well, I'm querying agents right now, but I'm considering booksurge since they're owned by Amazon. Lulu wasn't working for me, no. :(

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SarahWoodbury
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Post by SarahWoodbury » Tue June 23rd, 2009, 8:13 pm

Ah, yes, the querying agents odyssey. . . I have a file in my email account called 'reject'. There are 108 emails in it. I was reading a Steve Berry novel the other day and he says that he had 82 publisher rejections, not to say simply agents. Persistance is maybe not everything, but nearly so . . . .

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Wed June 24th, 2009, 12:53 am

It's a very very good idea to have someone read over your work. If you know a good copy editor or can find one to do it for you cheaply -- it will be worth every penny you pay them. And FAR better than signing up with one of those quirky agencies that, as BB pointed out, can be bogus. But also better than just doing POD on something where you've been the only editor.

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