Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Great action writer

Douglas W Jacobson
Location: Elm Grove, Wisconsin

Met Bernard Cornwell

Postby Douglas W Jacobson » Fri December 5th, 2008, 5:26 pm

Hi Everyone,
I'm also a big fan of Cornewll's and especially the Sharpe series. It's a real talent to create a character like Sharpe that develops a worldwide following.
I had the pleasure of meeting Bernard when we served on a panel together at the 2007 Historical Novel Society Convention in Albany, NY. He is a very entertaining speaker with terrific command of an audience. He's got a great sense of humor and, best of all, a measure of modesty about his work. In his own words, "After all, I'm just a storyteller!"

Douglas W Jacobson,
NIGHT OF FLAMES: A Novel of World War Two


Postby Swampy » Thu January 29th, 2009, 12:55 pm

I'm a fan of Mr Cornwell too!

Just finished Azincourt which I really enjoyed and would agree with other posters that Gallow's Thief and Redcoat are really good one off books.

I have read the Grail series and the Alfred the Great Series, but believe it or not have yet to get round to reading a single book from the Sharpe series. I've seen one or two of the televised episodes and maybe its the image of Sean Bean as Sharpe that sticks in my mind. Not that there's anything wrong with Sean Bean, but it makes it hard to imagine Sharpe as anything else!

User avatar
rex icelingas

Postby rex icelingas » Sat April 4th, 2009, 5:19 pm

Just wondering If anyone thinks they should perhaps have a TV spin off series of any other of BC`S books

Earl Uhtred? Arthur ? Thomas of Hookton?

Another question: do you think he should possibly carry on the Arthur story with Derfel Gadarn`s further adventures as i thought the trilogy ended a little open(and rather sad)

User avatar
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA

Postby Margaret » Sun June 7th, 2009, 11:40 pm

My turn finally came at the library for Agincourt/Azincourt, and I read it in about two days (well, maybe three). I thought it was exceptionally good and have posted a review at http://www.HistoricalNovels.info/Agincourt.html. Every page is infused with the results of Cornwell's research, but without ever getting the reader bogged down in a story-halting history lesson. I love the way he gets not only the technical details, but also the psychological details right. Of course, this is an unsparing depiction of brutal warfare, which is not for every reader - but I found it impressive the way Cornwell manages to convey the sense of triumph the English felt with their victory at Agincourt without ever glorifying or glamorizing the warfare itself.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings and over 650 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

User avatar
Avid Reader
Location: Georgia

Postby robinbird79 » Sun June 28th, 2009, 12:35 am

I enjoyed his Arthur series as it made it seem much more possible that he could have actually existed (and I'm a bit of a romantic...it would be nice to find out there WAS an Arthur).

After seeing the mention of some of BC's other books, I'll have to look them up and try to get my hands on them, especially the Agincourt one. :)

This charming manc

Postby This charming manc » Fri September 11th, 2009, 12:17 am

"Swampy" wrote:I'm a fan of Mr Cornwell too!
Just finished Azincourt which I really enjoyed and would agree with other posters that Gallow's Thief and Redcoat are really good one off books.

A great call there Redcoat is definitely one I wished he had followed up on, I hope he returns to that mine at some point.

Location: London

Postby njslater » Sun July 27th, 2014, 9:24 am

When I was younger I loved the Sharpe books but less certain now. The sheer longevity of the series makes it just a little too incredible. Also now I have started trying my own hand at writing in this period I think he takes a bit of licence with the scope of his battle writing. A rifleman even on a special mission would have little view of anything like Cornwell relates for the reader's benefit. The truth is Cornwell enjoys writing a fictional account of these epic battles which is fair enough I guess
N.J. Slater writer of Napoleonic and Victorian era thrillers

Return to “Bernard Cornwell”