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Crimean War

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parthianbow
Compulsive Reader
Location: Nr. Bristol, SW England
Contact:

Postby parthianbow » Wed December 15th, 2010, 7:00 am

[QUOTE=annabel;76076]Now looking for good non fiction books about the war.QUOTE]

Hi Annabel: you might be interested in the newly published, highly regarded Crimea by Orlando Figes (he of the Amazon scandal earlier in the year) then:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crimea-Allen-History-Orlando-Figes/dp/0713997044/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1292396340&sr=8-1
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

annabel
Scribbler

Postby annabel » Mon December 20th, 2010, 6:10 pm

Thanks, Parthianbow, that is now on my list for after Christmas.

At the moment I'm reading Mrs Duberly's War - finding it fascinating to read her first hand account.

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Kasthu
Compulsive Reader
Location: Radnor, PA
Contact:

Postby Kasthu » Fri January 7th, 2011, 12:44 am

Book 20 of the Morland Dynasty series, The Winter Journey, is set right in the middle of the Crimean War...

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri January 7th, 2011, 1:41 am

"Kasthu" wrote:Book 20 of the Morland Dynasty series, The Winter Journey, is set right in the middle of the Crimean War...


Thanks for that. I think I'm going to try The Rose of Sebastopol next.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

annabel
Scribbler

Postby annabel » Sat January 15th, 2011, 7:24 pm

Ive just finished The Rose of Sebastapol. I loved the early part of the book - she builds a convincing picture of Mariella, the quiet, dutiful daugher who is so meticulous in her manners and who sews so neatly and beautifully.
The Victorian details are deftly introduced so that you don't feel you are being given a history lesson - but there is enough to set her very firmly in her environment and time.
When she meets her wild cousin Rosa she begins a journey that ends with her in the Crimea, a rather different woman to the girl we first meet.
I liked the way that she adapts her clothes to make them looser and more comfortable when she is in the Crimea - just as she is becoming looser, more open, more comfortable in her own skin.
There is a lot to enjoy in this novel but towards the end I began to feel that it had lost its way a bit and I wasn't entirely satisfied with the ending. What did you think?

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Sat January 15th, 2011, 7:31 pm

"annabel" wrote:Ive just finished The Rose of Sebastapol. I loved the early part of the book - she builds a convincing picture of Mariella, the quiet, dutiful daugher who is so meticulous in her manners and who sews so neatly and beautifully.
The Victorian details are deftly introduced so that you don't feel you are being given a history lesson - but there is enough to set her very firmly in her environment and time.
When she meets her wild cousin Rosa she begins a journey that ends with her in the Crimea, a rather different woman to the girl we first meet.
I liked the way that she adapts her clothes to make them looser and more comfortable when she is in the Crimea - just as she is becoming looser, more open, more comfortable in her own skin.
There is a lot to enjoy in this novel but towards the end I began to feel that it had lost its way a bit and I wasn't entirely satisfied with the ending. What did you think?


annabel, I haven't quite got to it yet. Soon I hope.
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

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JMJacobsen
Reader
Location: Gig Harbor, Washington

Postby JMJacobsen » Sun January 23rd, 2011, 5:36 pm

"annabel" wrote:Ive just finished The Rose of Sebastapol. I loved the early part of the book - she builds a convincing picture of Mariella, the quiet, dutiful daugher who is so meticulous in her manners and who sews so neatly and beautifully.
The Victorian details are deftly introduced so that you don't feel you are being given a history lesson - but there is enough to set her very firmly in her environment and time.
When she meets her wild cousin Rosa she begins a journey that ends with her in the Crimea, a rather different woman to the girl we first meet.
I liked the way that she adapts her clothes to make them looser and more comfortable when she is in the Crimea - just as she is becoming looser, more open, more comfortable in her own skin.
There is a lot to enjoy in this novel but towards the end I began to feel that it had lost its way a bit and I wasn't entirely satisfied with the ending. What did you think?


Agreed....it was subtle and wonderful. I wasn't as disappointed in the end, but probably because the early part of the novel was so good that I forgave it.

My copy is going to Misfit when we have our next "book lunch". :)

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Antoine Vanner
Reader
Location: South-East England

Postby Antoine Vanner » Thu November 1st, 2012, 3:17 pm

And don't forget Harry Flashman's role in the Charge of the Light Brigade, as detailed in "Flashman at the Charge"!

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Thu November 1st, 2012, 6:56 pm

A L Berridge's recent novel Into the Valley of Death has had good reviews, though I haven't got to it yet myself.

And a nod for an older novel which I enjoyed back in the day (in fact all her older HF was excellent) - Sarah Woodhouse, Daughter of the Sea.


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