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Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 5:05 am
by Margaret
I was going to suggest Feast of All Saints, Divia, but Annis beat me to it. This is a well-researched, realistic historical novel, not one of Rice's vampire-related novels, and it's quite good, although it's been quite a while since I read it, and the details have become somewhat fuzzy.

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 10:48 am
by Divia
Oh! So its not about vampires? Hmm, that is a contender then. Thanks. :)

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 12:29 pm
by Misfit
Agree on both "Smouldering Fires" and "Mistletoe and the Sword", which was a very slight story- I almost wondered if it had been produced for the YA market.
I have an older hardback of Mistletoe and the Sword and the inside flap says it was written for the YA market.

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 4:07 pm
by Margaret
Good to know - Mistletoe does have a YA feel to it, with a quite young and inexperienced heroine. Somewhere, I saw a note indicating that Smouldering Fires was also for the YA market.

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 5:10 pm
by Ludmilla
It seems like in the 60s, 70s and 80s there were quite a few historical romances or swashbuckling type adventures set in this period, spanning from Revolutionary War to beyond the War of 1812 (or maybe my memory is playing tricks on me again because I don't remember titles or authors for any of them). But I don't think an evocative setting like that with a relationship in the forefront is what you are looking for.

I haven't read Feast of All Saints, but my college roommate did and I remember her commenting that she really liked it. Regardless of the subject matter, Rice can write very evocatively about New Orleans. I don't think I'll ever quite forget the darker side of the city she evoked in The Witching Hour.

The only recent read I can think of that has some overlap with Louisiana territory is Jonis Agee's The River Wife, mostly set along the Mississippi river in Missouri and multigenerational, but opens up with the story of a young woman rescued from the New Madrid earthquake site around 1811 or 1812. Her rescuer is a French fur trapper who has lived on and off with the Indians.

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 6:10 pm
by Nefret
[quote=""Margaret""]I was going to suggest Feast of All Saints, Divia, but Annis beat me to it. This is a well-researched, realistic historical novel, not one of Rice's vampire-related novels, and it's quite good, although it's been quite a while since I read it, and the details have become somewhat fuzzy.[/quote]

Yes, I agree with this one. And you reminded me that I need to read it again.

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 7:45 pm
by annis
I suppose given the current passion for all things vampire, the lack of vampires in "Feast of All Saints" might be considered by some as a disadvantage!

Posted by Ludmilla
It seems like in the 60s, 70s and 80s there were quite a few historical romances or swashbuckling type adventures set in this period, spanning from Revolutionary War to beyond the War of 1812 (or maybe my memory is playing tricks on me again because I don't remember titles or authors for any of them).
Where do these old books go? They just seem to vanish from record. My one about the Acadians which I can no longer identify was in this category of '60s/'70s swashbuckling aventures

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 9:35 pm
by Chris Little
Answer to Annis: Lebanon, Tennessee is one place ... The Southern Debindery outfit

http://www.southerndebinderyservices.com/

Posted: Wed February 17th, 2010, 11:05 pm
by annis
Arrrgh! Sacrilege! The percentage of books which are trashed is very high, though- I read this article a while ago, and discovered that it even higher than I thought.
http://thelatestoutrage.blogspot.com/20 ... dirty.html

Posted: Sat March 13th, 2010, 3:12 am
by annis
I quite inadvertently came across the older book about the Acadians that I was trying to recall.

"Cajun", by Elizabeth Nell Dubus (1986)
"Two families, the Langlinais, forever banished from their Nova Scotia homeland, with strength and determination they learned to farm the black bayou soil and to understand the ways of the New World-rising to become one of Louisiana's most powerful families and the De Clouets, pampered, vain, the cream of French society, they barely escaped the horrors of the Revolution and accustomed to the luxeries of court life they lived in the glow of past glory and lost nobility as they struggled to rebuild their lives. The "Cajun" story brings them together."

Foreword by author here:
http://www.storytellerelizabethnell.com/cajun_79747.htm

I believe it was the first in a trilogy, but I don't recall reading the other two.