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WWI Austria/Germany

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey & Pushing up Daisies by M C Beaton
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Mon March 3rd, 2014, 3:57 pm

Once again, history repeats itself, well hopefully not but it just proves that lessons from history are never learned.
Currently reading "To the Bright Edge of the World" by Eowyn Ivey & "Pushing up Daisies" by M C Beaton

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Mon March 3rd, 2014, 5:16 pm

"Madeleine" wrote:Once again, history repeats itself, well hopefully not but it just proves that lessons from history are never learned.


They never are learned, are they? I always end up shaking my head when I'm reading books set in 19C India and see that we haven't learned a thing.

I saw one news story online somewhere with links to other conflicts in the Crimea, including The Charge of the Light Brigade. I do hope they don't start romanticizing that :mad:
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Tue March 4th, 2014, 1:51 pm

Something to ponder and ask the international members here. A few friends were chatting at Goodreads and we're wondering about memorials, documentaries etc. being planned for the 100 year anniversary of the start of the war. Crickets here in the US, but a friend in the UK says there's lots being planned on her side of the pond. Any other countries marking it? Does the US media not care since it's not the start of the war for the US?
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed March 5th, 2014, 9:40 pm

Heaps going on here in New Zealand- as a super-keen member of the British Empire, colonial New Zealand threw itself headlong into the war effort and paid dearly for it. Colonial troops didn't fare well as they were considered rather expendable and tended to placed where they would get wiped out in large numbers. It wasn't unusual for families to lose several members- fathers, brothers, uncles, sons and cousins. It really showed up in small communities which were often left with few men between the ages of 20-40. Of course, with ghastly irony the next generation filled the gap just in time to head off to WWII.

I'm helping at the moment with preparing biographies of local soldiers who died during WW1.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Thu March 6th, 2014, 7:25 pm

Just thought I'd add this article here- without being too basic, it's one of the easier to follow explanations of how WWI began.

The Causes of World War One
http://www.firstworldwar.com/origins/causes.htm

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu March 6th, 2014, 7:30 pm

"annis" wrote:Heaps going on here in New Zealand- as a super-keen member of the British Empire, colonial New Zealand threw itself headlong into the war effort and paid dearly for it. Colonial troops didn't fare well as they were considered rather expendable and tended to placed where they would get wiped out in large numbers. It wasn't unusual for families to lose several members- fathers, brothers, uncles, sons and cousins. It really showed up in small communities which were often left with few men between the ages of 20-40. Of course, with ghastly irony the next generation filled the gap just in time to head off to WWII.

I'm helping at the moment with preparing biographies of local soldiers who died during WW1.


Oh how sad. It's just awful to think of any life as expendable like that. :(
At home with a good book and the cat...

...is the only place I want to be


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