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Japanese internment camps

Chatterbox
Bibliophile
Location: New York

Postby Chatterbox » Mon June 15th, 2009, 4:39 pm

Obasan by Joy Kogawa is the big Canadian novel focusing on the internment camps.

There's a lot of memoir/fiction out there -- Return to Manazanar, which I think is YA book?

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Mon June 15th, 2009, 5:56 pm

Posted by Diamondlil
We had an incident as well that has been made into a mini series a while ago - The Cowra Breakout


That's fascinating, Diamondlil- I had't come across mention of that Australian incident before.

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cookie
Scribbler
Location: NSW, Australia
Contact:

Postby cookie » Thu June 25th, 2009, 11:04 pm

Cowra is just up the road from me - there is a beautiful Japanese Garden as a tribute (just as we have a Chinese Tribute Garden here ).

"A Town at War" is a NF read you might like to track down:

http://www.cowraregion.com.au/atownatwar/?id=2861

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Sat June 27th, 2009, 12:14 am

Hi Cookie! Nice to see you dropping in!
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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cookie
Scribbler
Location: NSW, Australia
Contact:

Postby cookie » Sat June 27th, 2009, 12:26 am

Hi Marg - thanks.
I should pop in more often :)

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rockygirl
Avid Reader
Location: Upstate New York

Postby rockygirl » Fri September 10th, 2010, 12:22 am

I know this is an old thread, but I had several titles to add to the list.

Two more novels:

The No-No Boy by John Okada
The Climate of the Country by Marnie Mueller (I like this one much more than the No-No Boy. Its main characters are white workers at one of the internment camps.)

Two non-fiction that you may find interesting:

Citizen 13660 by Mine Okubo--First published in 1946, this is an autobiographical work. The author is a gifted artist and she uses her drawings and her writings to tell her story.

Adios to Tears: The Memoirs of a Japanese-Peruvian Internee in US Concentration Camps by Seiichi Higashide
This memoir tells a story not many know about the internment. The US requested that Peru send its citizens of Japanese descent to the US for internment. Incredibly, Peru complied with this request.


There is actually a book about the Japanese-Canadian Internment, but people might not know it as it is a YA book. It's entitled The Eternal Spring of Mr. Ito by Sheila Garrigue.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Fri September 10th, 2010, 1:12 am

No thread is old, just sleeping for a moment. Thanks for adding those!

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Susan
Bibliomaniac
Location: New Jersey, USA

Postby Susan » Fri September 10th, 2010, 11:49 am

I'm teaching 7th grade Language Arts Literacy for the first time this year and one of the novels I have to teach is about the Japanese internment camps: Journey Home by Yoshiko Uchida. The author was interned for three years with her family. I haven't yet read the novel, but I am looking forward to do so and to teach the novel and the history involved with it.
~Susan~
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rockygirl
Avid Reader
Location: Upstate New York

Postby rockygirl » Fri September 10th, 2010, 11:53 am

"Susan" wrote:I'm teaching 7th grade Language Arts Literacy for the first time this year and one of the novels I have to teach is about the Japanese internment camps: Journey Home by Yoshiko Uchida. The author was interned for three years with her family. I haven't yet read the novel, but I am looking forward to do so and to teach the novel and the history involved with it.


Yoshiko Uchida has written several YA novels about her experiences in the internment camps. Journey Home is very moving.

You might want to recommend these novels to your students who want to read more about the internment: Bat 6 and Under a Blood Red Sun. I've used both in my classes.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Thu December 16th, 2010, 1:28 pm

A bit of a twist, I'm currently reading Guests of the Emperor by Janice Young Brooks. This is about a group of women POW's in a Japanes prison camp in Malaysia. All civilians who didn't make it out of Singapore after the Japanese attacked - and a very different group of women it is. Right now they've realized they are in for the long haul and are working on creating a *society* with rules, etc. so that they can live together in some semblance of harmony.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be


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