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The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Sat April 21st, 2012, 12:59 am

[quote=""annis""]The irony of it all- now we have the Katniss Barbie doll. Also disturbing to me because it seems to be targeting the pre-teen market, and as far as I'm concerned The Hunger Games are definitely YA, not childrens'.[/quote]

It looks to me as if the Barbie doll is being marketed to adult collectors, not to children.
Susan Higginbotham
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annis
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Post by annis » Sat April 21st, 2012, 2:11 am

It may be marketed to adult collectors, but I bet any number of pre-teen girls will be whining to get one of their own, and I guarantee Mattel know that as well.

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Post by annis » Sat April 28th, 2012, 6:50 am

Interesting article in the Guardian about Suzanne Collins and the influences that have shaped her and her work. I kept saying to people "Hunger Games echoes the legend of Theseus and the Minotaur with the annual tribute of youths and maidens sent to Crete" and they'd look at me blankly, so felt justified when Collins said that story was a major inspiration - she's right into mythology :)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/ap ... es-profile

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The Czar
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Post by The Czar » Wed May 9th, 2012, 3:20 pm

I haven't read the Hunger Games, but if one more person walks up to me reading in a restaurant and asks me if I've read them, I'm gonna punch them in the throat. There ARE more than two or three books out there people!

(Not knocking them, and I will probably read them at some point, its just the "I read one book a year" twilight/hunger games people are annoying.)
Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results.
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wendy
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Post by wendy » Thu June 14th, 2012, 12:11 pm

I enjoyed the first and second books but the third I struggled to finish. Can't help thinking the trilogy should have ended with the original HUNGER GAMES!
Wendy K. Perriman
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Fri June 15th, 2012, 4:12 pm

Given the subject matter of The Hunger Games, I find the fact that they are producing a doll hilarious in a very wry and 'we are the Capitol' sort of way.
Yes, I immediately thought of the Thesius story when I began reading them. I'm on book 2 at the moment.
Les proz e les vassals
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Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

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For never will cowards fall down there.'

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Post by parthianbow » Wed June 27th, 2012, 10:34 am

Just finished the three books, and thought they were for the most part, excellent. I don't agree that the second book should have ended it. The third book was a little annoying, but the story was still strong enough to carry the tale to its conclusion, which I felt was very good. Not sugar-coated.
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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Wed June 27th, 2012, 10:46 am

[quote=""parthianbow""]Just finished the three books, and thought they were for the most part, excellent. I don't agree that the second book should have ended it. The third book was a little annoying, but the story was still strong enough to carry the tale to its conclusion, which I felt was very good. Not sugar-coated.[/quote]

I agree Ben. I finished the final one last night and thought they were all excellent. Like you I thought book 3 was justified and very much disagree with the mindset of the low review whingers at Amazon. I thought it was well thought out and well paced. Not only was it a strong action/adventure read, it gave the reader pause for thought - if of course the reader was prepared to think.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed June 27th, 2012, 2:02 pm

My biggest problem with the third book is that I couldn't suspend disbelief when it came to the Capitol's defenses. It felt like Ms. Collins hadn't had time to think that one through-- the technical aspects were bizarre (particularly the muttations) and just didn't make sense from either a defensive or a political standpoint.

The character part of the story was well done.

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Miss Moppet
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Post by Miss Moppet » Wed July 4th, 2012, 10:59 pm

[quote=""MLE""]My biggest problem with the third book is that I couldn't suspend disbelief when it came to the Capitol's defenses. It felt like Ms. Collins hadn't had time to think that one through-- the technical aspects were bizarre (particularly the muttations) and just didn't make sense from either a defensive or a political standpoint. [/quote]

Same here, it didn't make sense to me either. It seemed way too random. The whole trilogy was a good read but I enjoyed the first one most.

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