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Posted: Fri September 10th, 2010, 1:50 pm
by rockygirl
Jane Eyre--definitely my number one. Read it as a kid and still love it.

In no particular order:

Wuthering Heights
Emma
The Scarlet Pimpernal (glad to see it on other lists)
The Awakening

And while it's not a book--the Sherlock Holmes stories

Posted: Fri September 10th, 2010, 2:30 pm
by Michy
I really like The Scarlet Pimpernel, also. He reminds me of the "original" masked superhero. :D So handsome, so rich, so intelligent, so brave..... *sigh*

Sherlock Holmes was one of my favorites growing up. I loved mysteries, and when I outgrew Nancy Drew I graduated to Sherlock Holmes, and read nearly every novel and short story, I believe. A few years ago I picked one up and decided to give it a try. It was the first time I read one as an adult, and it ended up being the only time, as Sherlock just didn't hold up for me as an adult reader. I was so disappointed -- it's a little sad when a much-loved book/character from the past just doesn't cut it, anymore.... :(

Posted: Fri September 10th, 2010, 6:46 pm
by SGM
I found Jude the Obscure one of the most wrist-slashing experiences of all time.

However, I still find the opening pages of Return of the Native some of the most stunning prose of all time.

Therese Raquin gave me nightmares but found I Earth fascinating and strangely useful in later years when trying to understand and write about The Common Agricultural Policy - hmmm. There's sense in their somewhere.

19th Century

Posted: Sun May 22nd, 2011, 5:06 pm
by The Czar
I don't really care for the Victorian era much. Too much bodice ripping, not enough meat for my taste. That said, my favorites...

The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde (This is a smart, well written Victorian novel with a dark side.)

War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy (I am about 300 pages in and can hardly put it down. Immense in scope already, and very well written.)

Anything by Dostoyevsky - (Oddly, I haven't read brothers Karamozov yet, it will be next when I finish War and Peace. But I have read most of his others, and Crime and Punishment and The House of the Dead in particular I love).

The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas - (has anybody read his "new" one? http://www.amazon.com/Last-Cavalier-Adv ... 613&sr=1-1

Les Miserables - Victor Hugo

Treasure Island - Robert Lewis Stevenson

Here is some of my favorites that are set in the 19th C, but not actually written there.

The Flashman Series - George Macdonald Frasier (These are hilarious, and contain more history than you think).

The Sharpe Series - Bernard Cornwell

The Aubery-Maturin Novels - Patrick O'brien (All you ever wanted to know and then some about the Napoleonic Era Royal Navy.)

Posted: Mon May 23rd, 2011, 12:59 pm
by Madeleine
[quote=""SGM""]I found Jude the Obscure one of the most wrist-slashing experiences of all time.

However, I still find the opening pages of Return of the Native some of the most stunning prose of all time.

Therese Raquin gave me nightmares but found I Earth fascinating and strangely useful in later years when trying to understand and write about The Common Agricultural Policy - hmmm. There's sense in their somewhere.[/quote]

I've always thought this was one of Hardy's best books, it's often overlooked but worth a mention. Jude, I have to agree, whilst a worthy tome, is not for the easily depressed.... :eek:

Posted: Mon May 23rd, 2011, 7:57 pm
by SGM
[quote=""The Czar""]War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy (I am about 300 pages in and can hardly put it down. Immense in scope already, and very well written.)

Anything by Dostoyevsky - (Oddly, I haven't read brothers Karamozov yet, it will be next when I finish War and Peace. But I have read most of his others, and Crime and Punishment and The House of the Dead in particular I love).[/quote]

I, too, enjoyed War and Peace, having read Anna Karenina a few years before which I admit I preferred but I also enjoyed Resurrrection (this is all so many years ago). I have a copy of Cossacks now which I just don't seem to get round to reading.

I really never could get on with Dostoyevski and live in hope that one day I will. I also went through a phase of Turgenev when I was in my teens which I enjoyed at the time but I wonder if I would now.

Posted: Tue May 24th, 2011, 8:59 pm
by The Czar
[quote=""SGM""]I, too, enjoyed War and Peace, having read Anna Karenina a few years before which I admit I preferred but I also enjoyed Resurrrection (this is all so many years ago). I have a copy of Cossacks now which I just don't seem to get round to reading.

I really never could get on with Dostoyevski and live in hope that one day I will. I also went through a phase of Turgenev when I was in my teens which I enjoyed at the time but I wonder if I would now.[/quote]

I think I'm gonna try August 1914 by Solzhenitsyn next. Either that or Brothers Karamazov.

Posted: Tue May 24th, 2011, 10:11 pm
by SGM
[quote=""The Czar""]I think I'm gonna try August 1914 by Solzhenitsyn next. Either that or Brothers Karamazov.[/quote]

I've only done First Circe and One Day in the Life of....

But again so long ago. I wonder if I should go back to some of these writers and finish them off....May be. So many books, so little time, particularly as I am not really reading much fiction at the moment.

Posted: Thu June 2nd, 2011, 5:43 am
by The Czar
[quote=""SGM""]I also went through a phase of Turgenev when I was in my teens which I enjoyed at the time but I wonder if I would now.[/quote]

That always upsets me, when I re-read a book that really blew my mind at one point, and it just doesn't resonate anymore. The two examples that come to mind are...

The Catcher in the Rye - This book just floored me as a 16 year old boy. I read it over and over. Read it again when I was 28 or so... it had lost its charm.

Atlas Shrugged - I read this when I was 24, and basically skipped several days of classes and read constantly. Thought I had everything figured out, and that I had finally found the "truth." Well, read it again not long ago, and while I still like the book, a good deal of the philosophy doesn't ring to me anymore.

I guess books, being encapsulated ideas, are like anything else. You outgrow them. That's why I'm interested as I continue this classics kick I'm on to see if maybe I "grew into" some stuff I didn't like when I was forced to read it as a student.

Posted: Thu June 2nd, 2011, 11:09 am
by EC2
I'm not that keen on 19thC books, but I did enjoy Jane Eyre when I was younger. Is Little Women 19thC? That was good. I also like 19thC ghost stories but couldn't name any one author. In fact such anthologies are a secret vice of mine!