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Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

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Rowan
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Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

Post by Rowan » Wed April 29th, 2015, 2:41 pm

I'm currently listening to this huge novel because trying to read it became tedious for me. I'm pretty well into it, but I am wondering if any of these events that happen to people ever tie in together. It feels like the author goes off on tangents that don't seem to be related to anything at all, but then you are reminded of how the character fits into the tale. But why, then, would the author continually do this?


It just feels all convoluted and bloated.
Last edited by Rowan on Wed April 29th, 2015, 2:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Wed April 29th, 2015, 3:41 pm

there's a TV adaptation due to be shown soon, so maybe that'll clear things up! I have the book but haven't read it, it's right at the bottom of mount tbr.
Currently reading "The Temptation of Forgiveness" by Donna Leon & "The Stone Circle" by Elly Griffiths

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Wed April 29th, 2015, 6:58 pm

It's big enough to be worthy of holding up a mountain, Madeleine. Lol

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu April 30th, 2015, 9:27 am

[quote=""Rowan""]It's big enough to be worthy of holding up a mountain, Madeleine. Lol[/quote]

That's exactly what it's doing ;) :)
Currently reading "The Temptation of Forgiveness" by Donna Leon & "The Stone Circle" by Elly Griffiths

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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Wed May 13th, 2015, 8:27 pm

I started it more than six years ago, but didn't have the time to really concentrate on it. It is a bit jumpy and very detailed (those footnotes!), but I hope to begin again very soon. I've set my DVR to record the TV adaptation and am really looking forward to binge-watching it.
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Sun May 24th, 2015, 7:48 pm

The first time I tried reading this novel, I dropped out after a few pages. The second time, I got hooked by the tongue-in-cheek style of the footnotes, read it all the way through, and loved it. A big part of the pleasure of this novel is the way it pokes fun at academia, and the footnotes are integral to that. It's hard for me to imagine how they could be handled effectively in a books-on-tape (or CD) format.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon May 25th, 2015, 4:14 am

This is another book I started, but also didn't get far into. The dry humor on academia is an integral part of the style, but it reminds me of CS Lewis' That Hideous Strength, which I found so boring that I only got through it because it was a bookgroup read.

But then, I confess to not being much of an academic. Despite spending a large amount of my youth pounding the halls of various campuses of higher learning (courtesy of the GI Bill) My ADHD style just doesn't fit well into a classroom. And reading about them sends me cross-eyed.

Maybe I'll like it when it comes on Netflix. The change in format certainly improved Wolf Hall. (No pronoun confusions in film.)

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blueemerald
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Post by blueemerald » Mon May 25th, 2015, 10:47 pm

I am amongst the minority who enjoyed this novel. Probably because my feeble mentation processed it on a fairly simple level. Nonetheless, I appreciated the magical realism story, the presentation as if it was an academic text complete with detailed (curious and curiouser) footnotes, and the topic the history/teaching of magic. Toward the end, the story seemed to become too wrapped up in itself. It risked imploding, and exploded instead (or both). I admit I had to frequently re-commit to continue reading it. It was a different read than my typical and I'm satisfied having read it.

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Nefret
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Re: Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

Post by Nefret » Sun September 13th, 2015, 6:54 pm

Have any of you read 'The Ladies of Grace Adieu'? (Reading that and the novel again.)
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

annis
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Re: Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

Post by annis » Thu December 24th, 2015, 10:34 pm

I actually bought this novel some time ago and then lost it in my ever-expanding collection of books :) However, I have just started watching the TV series and enjoying its dark, off-beat vibe very much.

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