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Pyridain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander

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sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Location: London, UK

Postby sweetpotatoboy » Fri August 20th, 2010, 11:00 am

"parthianbow" wrote:How funny! The Weirdstone of Brisingamen and the sequel The Moon of Gomrath were two of my all time favourites, as were the Susan Cooper books. Incidentally, Jules, did you know that the 2nd book, The Dark is Rising, was made in to a film about 1 or 2 years ago?


I was just about to say all of that as well! Loved all those books. Know about the film but not seen yet.

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juleswatson
Avid Reader
Location: now Washington DC
Contact:

Postby juleswatson » Fri August 20th, 2010, 11:15 am

"parthianbow" wrote:How funny! The Weirdstone of Brisingamen and the sequel The Moon of Gomrath were two of my all time favourites, as were the Susan Cooper books. Incidentally, Jules, did you know that the 2nd book, The Dark is Rising, was made in to a film about 1 or 2 years ago? Not seen it, but my dad said it was quite good.



OMG no! I must track it down; I LURVED those books. I started reading The Dark is Rising novels to my husband, but discovered that he falls asleep as soon as anyone starts reading to him (must be childhood programming). So we have not got far into book one (and he also forgets the last bits of what I read to him the night before....sooo frustrating :eek :) I actually won my first writing competition at the age of 11 by writing a fantasy "novella" that I confess had a strong resemblance to Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner! Amazing writer - he made you feel as if the land itself could come alive at any moment, and there were all these hidden mysterious forces all around you, in the trees and lakes. Yup...big influence on my books! And Ben - hope you frame your bestseller list!
Author of Celtic historical fantasy
New book "THE RAVEN QUEEN" out Feb 22 2011: The story of Maeve, the famous warrior queen of Irish mythology.
Out now, "THE SWAN MAIDEN", the ancient tale of Deirdre, the Irish 'Helen of Troy'
http://www.juleswatson.com

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Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 7:55 pm

"parthianbow" wrote:Hey Keny, thanks for posting about these books! What a blast from the past. I too loved these books as a boy. It's so funny that so many other members liked them too. I haven't read them as an adult, but as I still have them (I kept all the best of my fantasy books), I must get them next time I visit my parents.


Did you manage to find them? I had them in paperback but misplaced a few. luckily, i bought a nice hardback of the whole series. but like yours, it resides with my parents in a faraway land.

Eigon
Reader
Location: Hay-on-Wye, Town of Books
Contact:

Postby Eigon » Sat October 2nd, 2010, 8:01 pm

Jules - do yourself a favour and avoid the film of the Dark is Rising if you have any fond memories of the book. I believe they had to change the title before it came out because it bore so little resemblance.
"There were no full time Vikings back then. Everybody had another job."
Neil Gaiman, from Odd and the Frost Giants.

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michaelbolan
Newbie
Currently reading: The Grotto's Secret by Paula Wynne
Interest in HF: History got screwed up for me in school, so I dropped the subject as soon as I could. It was only when I was older that I realised it wasn't history that was the issue, it was history teachers... Now I'm just trying to get caught up on what I've missed over the last two millennia.
Favorite HF book: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
Preferred HF: Many: classical civilisations (the Graeco-Roman era), the Dark Ages (northern Europe) and of course, post-Renaissance Early Modern Age - the time of discovery.
Location: Prague

Re: Pyridain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander

Postby michaelbolan » Tue October 18th, 2016, 10:44 am

Lloyd Alexander has a lot to answer for. From the Chronicles of Prydain, I moved onto the Mabinogion, the Arthurian legends, then into Geoffrey of Monmouth's tomes, across the water into Lyonesse, through history into Charlemagne and Roland and across borders into central Europe. Which is where I live now. All I seem to read is history/ mythology/ fantasy, and it's all his fault!

Actually, the stories stick with me. I read them at the right time, and have never forgotten them. Outstanding work.


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