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hi from me, and help pls:)

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Wed November 12th, 2008, 7:40 pm

The earl lived in the 18th century. Captain Cook counted him as one of his patrons, naming Hawaii after him. I do find it hard to believe that nobody ever put anything on bread before him.

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Wed November 12th, 2008, 7:54 pm

Trenchers were bread. In a way, one might consider them a sort of open-faced sandwich. I think through most of the medieval period, the majority of folks would have considered themselves living in the lap of luxury if they had any meat to eat along with their bread.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

chuck
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Post by chuck » Wed November 12th, 2008, 7:54 pm

I for one thinks the use of anachronisms are going to get worse before it's gets better....I agree the "feel of the period" is important....And as long as I'm ranting...today's Historical films are full of cheap budget set/costumes/weapons mistakes or the screen plays must simplify or make storyline appealing to today's audiences...I applaud the HF authors who due their research and can still spin a interesting tale.....

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Wed November 12th, 2008, 8:11 pm

I think the Earl of Sandwich just formalised the whole jobby. Perhaps being an aristo he'd never had recourse to this sort of rustic manner of eating before. Open sandwiches have been around forever in other guises. There's a recipe for the medieval period where the interior of a bread roll is removed, mixed with other stuff, put back in the roll and eaten. People here in the UK will also eat variatons on the sandwich - the word 'sandwich' is only ever applied to food eaten between sliced bread from a loaf. They will eat a 'ham cob' a 'bacon butty' a 'cheese roll', a 'salad bap,' - all words for bread shaped like a burger bun that is frequently eaten with a filling. I can't give you provenance for anyone eating food between two bits of bread, and it certainly wouldn't have been called a sandwich back then, but they very likely had an equivalent.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

chuck
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Post by chuck » Wed November 12th, 2008, 8:36 pm

I will have to pay more attention watching in Historic films..... when slice bread appears...I'm use to seeing the actors tear or break of a piece of bread than dip into the broth etc....

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Wed November 12th, 2008, 8:42 pm

[quote=""EC2""]I think the Earl of Sandwich just formalised the whole jobby. Perhaps being an aristo he'd never had recourse to this sort of rustic manner of eating before. Open sandwiches have been around forever in other guises. There's a recipe for the medieval period where the interior of a bread roll is removed, mixed with other stuff, put back in the roll and eaten. People here in the UK will also eat variatons on the sandwich - the word 'sandwich' is only ever applied to food eaten between sliced bread from a loaf. They will eat a 'ham cob' a 'bacon butty' a 'cheese roll', a 'salad bap,' - all words for bread shaped like a burger bun that is frequently eaten with a filling. I can't give you provenance for anyone eating food between two bits of bread, and it certainly wouldn't have been called a sandwich back then, but they very likely had an equivalent.[/quote]

Interesting, that sort of stuffed loaf was known in the Arab world as a Frankish loaf. Still often made today.
Of course a peasent would have been more than happy to eat meat on bread, but they would have had recourse to things like butter, or lard, or vegetables I would think.

marnie
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thnx!!

Post by marnie » Sat November 15th, 2008, 10:26 pm

Hi everyone!

I am so glad that I had so many replies!!

Thank you all from the bottom of my heart! I appreciated very much!

I was wondering, if anyone know, what do authors do in order to avoid anachronisms? Are there any online dictionaries or anything else to help them avoid mistakes in writing a novel?

once again thank you veeeeeeery much!!!

xxx

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Margaret
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Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
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Post by Margaret » Sun November 16th, 2008, 12:45 am

There's no simple way for authors to avoid anachronisms. Research, research, research. An author just has to know the period s/he is writing about very well, and even then is likely to get tripped up by this or that. It helps to have the kind of imagination that can clearly visualize a scene, step by step, and raise red flags if something feels out of place.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Sun November 16th, 2008, 7:27 am

As Margaret said, research. Online dictionaries are rarely of much help.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun November 16th, 2008, 10:53 am

[quote=""Volgadon""]As Margaret said, research. Online dictionaries are rarely of much help.[/quote]

I agree with Margaret and Volgadon. Do the research and a feel for the period and the words will come. Using a dictionary is no substitute and the earlier a historical writer goes, the less use a dictionary becomes. A dictionary I do use as part of my research armour is the onlline etymological dictionary.
http://www.etymonline.com/ but it's only an occasional look up. Research across the spectrum is the only way to get an authentic feel to a historical novel - IMO
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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