Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

The Red Tent

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4435
Joined: August 2008
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

The Red Tent

Post by Divia » Tue December 9th, 2014, 12:26 am

US viewers is anyone watching this? I like it so far. To be fair I havent read the book. I was wondering if it goes with the book and for those who did read it what are your thoughts?
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Susan
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3746
Joined: August 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Tue December 9th, 2014, 1:05 am

I read the book and I am DVRing it, so I will eventually watch it but I am not sure I'd be able to answer your question. I read the book quite a while ago.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3557
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Tue December 9th, 2014, 4:11 pm

I remember the book well. I raise livestock and have a lot of contact with people who still live in subsistence areas of the globe, and it was the stupidest premise I have ever come across. The author writes as though she were (haven't checked, so don't know) a city-born and bred urbanite who actually thinks working-age women in a subsistence nomadic culture have the leisure to spend up to one-fourth of their time sitting around doing nothing. Maybe SHE can.

I also did not like that she borrowed an account sacred to three major religions and switched it up as a way of gaining notoriety. It worked for her, of course---offensive strategies are great attention-getters. So are tantrums. And bomb threats. But they don't inspire me to admiration.
Last edited by MLE (Emily Cotton) on Tue December 9th, 2014, 4:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4435
Joined: August 2008
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Post by Divia » Tue December 9th, 2014, 11:25 pm

What religious elements did she borrow. There wasnt a whole lot of religion in the movie actually. They talked about the Goddesss.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
Susan
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3746
Joined: August 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Tue December 9th, 2014, 11:43 pm

MLE, I thought there was someone here who didn't like the lack of authenticity in the novel. I was sort of recalling a discussion, but wasn't sure. Divia, isn't the main character in the mini-series the daughter of Jacob, the biblical patriarch?
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3557
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed December 10th, 2014, 1:43 am

LOL, Susan, I guess Red Tent was more irritating than your usual ill-conceived novel because it became so widely read. And because I read it when I was in the middle of running a transition home for women and children, and (in addition to the incredibly stupid women-sitting-on-their-butts-in-a-subsistence-culture angle) the relationships presented in the novel struck me as so completely WRONG for women living together and sharing a man.

Yep, it still annoys me. Probably takes the prize on all levels. Had to finish it for book group, or I wouldn't have wasted the time.

Although the recent Pulitzer Prize winner, the Goldfinch, is a close second.

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3557
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed December 10th, 2014, 1:51 am

Divia, the religious angle is the story of Jacob and this four wives, Rachael, Leah, Bilhah and Zilpah. These are the mothers of the twelve sons who became (mostly) the twelve tribes of Israel. Diamant mixed up several of whose children were whose, re-wrote the story of Joseph in Egypt, and did several other deliberate switch-ups just to infuriate conservative Jews, Muslims, and Christians. And the Goddess angle was a deliberate attempt to work that. She figured (rightly) that working with a well-known Biblical account would gain her publicity, and the more noses she tweaked, the more publicity.

I would have forgiven her that if she had a. put together a believable fictional world by doing her research on nomadic livestock cultures and b. actually created a story that was better than medium-awful. But maybe the screenwriters have improved on the book. I hope so.

User avatar
sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Posts: 1641
Joined: August 2008
Location: London, UK

Post by sweetpotatoboy » Wed December 10th, 2014, 3:47 pm

Yet again, we have a drama based in the Middle East yet most of the main characters are played by white actors.
I just about came round to the half-Swedish/half-British Rebecca Ferguson as the lead in The White Queen. But I just can't see how she can be playing Dinah!!
Maybe it works. But I'd need a lot of convincing!

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4435
Joined: August 2008
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Post by Divia » Wed December 10th, 2014, 10:40 pm

[quote=""Susan""]MLE, I thought there was someone here who didn't like the lack of authenticity in the novel. I was sort of recalling a discussion, but wasn't sure. Divia, isn't the main character in the mini-series the daughter of Jacob, the biblical patriarch?[/quote]

I didnt know that until MLE posted it. I've never read the Bible, and now little of it, to be honest. I know Jesus and his story, but that's pretty much where it ends.

[quote=""MLE (Emily Cotton)""]Divia, the religious angle is the story of Jacob and this four wives, Rachael, Leah, Bilhah and Zilpah. These are the mothers of the twelve sons who became (mostly) the twelve tribes of Israel. Diamant mixed up several of whose children were whose, re-wrote the story of Joseph in Egypt, and did several other deliberate switch-ups just to infuriate conservative Jews, Muslims, and Christians. And the Goddess angle was a deliberate attempt to work that. She figured (rightly) that working with a well-known Biblical account would gain her publicity, and the more noses she tweaked, the more publicity.

I would have forgiven her that if she had a. put together a believable fictional world by doing her research on nomadic livestock cultures and b. actually created a story that was better than medium-awful. But maybe the screenwriters have improved on the book. I hope so.[/quote]

I didnt know that until you typed it. I was just watching an entertaining movie. I liked it. I will say that she is a savvy writer because she took some elements and changed them to her liking and she sold many o' copies. However, I can see how it would upset some people, especially those who read the Bible and are hardcore purists when it comes to stories.

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]Yet again, we have a drama based in the Middle East yet most of the main characters are played by white actors.
I just about came round to the half-Swedish/half-British Rebecca Ferguson as the lead in The White Queen. But I just can't see how she can be playing Dinah!!
Maybe it works. But I'd need a lot of convincing![/quote]

The new Annie is black. She's an iconic character with flaming red hair. I guess I don't think about it, or rather it doesn't bother me too much. I found the MC to be strong, uppity and good in the role. She also had nice hair ;)
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

User avatar
wendy
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 592
Joined: September 2010
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
Contact:

Post by wendy » Thu December 11th, 2014, 1:15 pm

My book club also read THE RED TENT when it first came out. The general opinion was that Diamant should have invented her own characters from that era, not used characters from the Old Testament and then changed their stories. The Christians among us found her take highly offensive.
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com

Post Reply

Return to “Movies, Television, Radio, and Music”