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Posted: Fri November 5th, 2010, 10:50 pm
by Margaret
Those silvery blue disks make it look like Sci-Fi to me. Wonder what they're meant to be ....

Can't get better than this.

Posted: Wed November 10th, 2010, 4:55 am
by JaneRob
Dorothy Dunnett, my favorite author and l have the whole Nicolo and Lymond sets, and am busy making my way through King Hereafter.

The Lymond Chronicles are my favorite, started with the second book Queen's play and worked my way through the series from there. It was years before I managed to get a copy of the first book. Queen's Play is probably my favorite book. I am afraid every author from there on gets compared to Dorothy D.

Other favorite historical novelists are MM Kaye (ie Shadow of the Moon my fav.) and Isabel Allende. I have come on to this site to find out some more author's as yet unknown to me, l do have trouble working out who are the better ones.

I first cam across Dorothy Dunnett back in the early 1980's, have read the Lymond series twice and have started the Nicolo series again recently. Lymond is my favorite obviously.

I started my Daughter on the Lymond series when she was about 15 yo. I knew it would be hard fer her at that age, but in regards to literature, she can read anything now. She loves historical, but likes fantasy the best.

I also do some volunteer proofing and formatting for DP and the Gutenburg project. Looking forward to discovering more great literature.

Cheers

Jane

Posted: Wed November 10th, 2010, 7:53 pm
by SGM
[quote=""JaneRob""]Dorothy Dunnett, my favorite author and l have the whole Nicolo and Lymond sets, and am busy making my way through King Hereafter.

The Lymond Chronicles are my favorite, started with the second book Queen's play and worked my way through the series from there. It was years before I managed to get a copy of the first book. Queen's Play is probably my favorite book. I am afraid every author from there on gets compared to Dorothy D. [/quote]

I have just finished the Lymond sextet. Well done, getting into it from QP. I started from GoK and worked my way through in order. But I have to admit that it took me a long time getting into QP -- page 300 of 600 (when Richard Crawford turned up.)

I understant the DD's favourite authors were Georgette Heyer, Baroness Orczy and Rafael Sabatini which as a Gutenberg proof-reader you will know are mostly available online. I read the obvious ones of these in my teens (ie the ones they had made films out of) but am now delving into some of the others. I have just acquired Fortune's Fool because it is set in the Restoration and Sussex - two of my particular interests.

I read all the Baroness Orczy ones I could get my hands on as a kid (which means not all of them) but for some reason haven't been able to get into them again recently. However, I will try again soon.

Posted: Thu November 11th, 2010, 4:01 am
by annis
There'a also a Sabatini called The Tavern Knight which covers the Battle of Worcester and the escape of Charles II. However, it has to be said that not all Sabatini novels are equal, though they do cover interesting historical events.

There's a useful chronology of events represented in Sabatini's novels here:
http://denenberg.com/sabatini/timeline.html

Posted: Thu November 11th, 2010, 10:33 am
by JaneRob
Hi Annis,

I get a bit spoiled for choice at Gutenburg, have yet to finish a book but do I a lot of formatting when online. I am waiting for some of the books l have worked on to be completed, but this may take a few years. I will check out some of your suggestions.

Cheers

Jane

Posted: Thu November 11th, 2010, 6:49 pm
by SGM
[quote=""annis""]There'a also a Sabatini called The Tavern Knight which covers the Battle of Worcester and the escape of Charles II. However, it has to be said that not all Sabatini novels are equal, though they do cover interesting historical events.

There's a useful chronology of events represented in Sabatini's novels here:
http://denenberg.com/sabatini/timeline.html[/quote]

Yes I have a full list (my Dad was a huge fan in my earliest years) but unfortunately not all are available on Gutenberg and I find the pdfs from Archive.net restrict me to the computer as I do not have an e-book reader yet. So I have to get hold of them second hand which is not cheap in all cases. I know they are not all "classics" like Captain Blood and Scaramouche but I am trying to dig up novels covering a period during which few novels were written (and preferably not about royalty). I have a copy of the Jonathan Neld Guide which helps a lot.

Posted: Thu November 11th, 2010, 7:31 pm
by Ludmilla
I understant the DD's favourite authors were Georgette Heyer, Baroness Orczy and Rafael Sabatini which as a Gutenberg proof-reader you will know are mostly available online. I read the obvious ones of these in my teens (ie the ones they had made films out of) but am now delving into some of the others. I have just acquired Fortune's Fool because it is set in the Restoration and Sussex - two of my particular interests.
Given Dunnett's fondness for Sabatini, I've always thought that a certain scene in Game of Kings that involved Lymond masquerading as a certain Spaniard was just a little bit influenced by a scene in The Sea Hawk. The narrative sleight of hand in how the scenes were written reminded me of one another.

Posted: Fri November 12th, 2010, 1:51 pm
by JaneRob
[quote=""SGM""]Yes I have a full list (my Dad was a huge fan in my earliest years) but unfortunately not all are available on Gutenberg and I find the pdfs from Archive.net restrict me to the computer as I do not have an e-book reader yet. So I have to get hold of them second hand which is not cheap in all cases. I know they are not all "classics" like Captain Blood and Scaramouche but I am trying to dig up novels covering a period during which few novels were written (and preferably not about royalty). I have a copy of the Jonathan Neld Guide which helps a lot.[/quote]
Do you have Firefox? There is an add on to the Firefox browser you can get called 'e-pub' which is a free reader. You can download the files from Gutenberg in the e-pub format and bookmark the page, very useful.

Jane

Posted: Wed December 1st, 2010, 6:50 pm
by Michy
I just started my first Dorothy Dunnett last night, Game of Kings. (had never even heard of Dorothy Dunnett until joining this forum! :eek: :eek: :eek :)

I am only about 30 pages in, so it is way too early for me bring in a verdict, but I can see what people mean about her writing not being all that easy to fall into. Someone in this thread described her style as "opaque" -- that seems an apt description. Also, at times her dialogue is not easy for me to follow -- I feel like it's going over my head.

At any rate, at this point I am not even close to giving up on it........

Posted: Wed December 1st, 2010, 7:05 pm
by Ludmilla
Michy, keep in mind that in the first half of that book, Dunnett deliberately keeps her readers in the dark about a number of things that are going on. During the 2nd half you'll experience several aha! so that's what was happening moments! It's really very thrilling by the end if you don't get too frustrated with the subterfuge in the first half.