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Medical Historians

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Rowan
Bibliophile
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
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Medical Historians

Postby Rowan » Thu March 9th, 2017, 7:27 pm

Does anyone know of an medical historians or is anyone here a medical historian? I'm trying to find out exactly what ulcerous carcinoma is, but search engines are redirecting me to ulcerative colitis. Is that the same thing?

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Mythica
Bibliophile
Preferred HF: European and American (mostly pre-20th century)
Location: Colorado
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Re: Medical Historians

Postby Mythica » Thu March 9th, 2017, 11:45 pm

No, they are not the same thing, carcinoma is cancer. It might be similar/the same as this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjolin's_ulcer or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squamous_cell_carcinoma or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basal-cell_carcinoma

Ulcerative colitis is a gastro-intestinal disease that causes ulcers in the colon. Nothing to do with cancer.

Disclaimer: I am not a medical professional or medical historian. My mom is a nurse, and gastro-intestinal diseases run in my family so I'm familiar with UC.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Re: Medical Historians

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Fri March 10th, 2017, 1:24 am

I needed a cancerous skin ulcer in my 16th-century Spanish character, something that would be visible to others at need (so I put it on the chest, where he could also hide it) but steadily debilitating, like going into the lungs. Did some research, and bingo! Kaposi's Sarcoma. First documented in southern Mediterranean men circa 1500, perticularly those of Sephardic (Jewish) extraction.
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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Medical Historians

Postby Amanda » Fri March 10th, 2017, 10:38 pm

Kaposi's Sarcoma is also dominant in HIV+ patients.

The common garden variety basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a skin cancer that ulcerates, and has another lovely name - Rodent Ulcer - as its like it is constantly nibbled away. However, BCCs typically only locally invade, and they don't become metastatic.

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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Medical Historians

Postby Amanda » Fri March 10th, 2017, 10:43 pm

However, at that time, diagnosis would not have been very specific. Microscopes were only in their infancy, so all diagnosis would have been via clinical examination.

BTW, I work in pathology, so medical history interests me, though i haven't studied it formally.


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