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Irish Historical Fiction

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parthianbow
Compulsive Reader
Location: Nr. Bristol, SW England
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Some great titles already mentioned

Postby parthianbow » Wed May 13th, 2009, 2:07 pm

Just to throw in my tuppence ha'penny worth:
I cannot second 'Star of the Sea' by Joseph O'Connor enough - an outstanding book.
Published some time ago, but still in print and internationally recognised as great books were Walter Macken's loosely linked trilogy which spanned from the invasion of Cromwell in the 1640s (he's still a figure of hatred where I come from in Ireland) to the Irish Famine and the War of Independence against the English: they are Seek The Fair Land, The Silent People and The Scorching Wind respectively. Top class HF. http://www.waltermacken.com
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

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Volgadon
Compulsive Reader
Location: Israel
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Postby Volgadon » Sat May 16th, 2009, 12:53 pm

The Year of the French.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sat May 16th, 2009, 7:31 pm

Good call, Volgadon. In fact the whole of Thomas Flanagan's Irish trilogy is worth reading, though "Year of the French" is probably the best single volume. "Tenants of Time" is the second volume and "End of the Hunt" the third.

Cuchulainn
Reader

Postby Cuchulainn » Mon May 18th, 2009, 6:38 pm

I would suggest Stephen Lawhead's "Patrick."

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anne whitfield
Reader
Location: England
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Postby anne whitfield » Mon May 25th, 2009, 11:19 pm

Elaine Crowley - Dreams Of Other Days. Irish potato famine

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Jack
Reader
Location: California

Postby Jack » Sun May 31st, 2009, 8:12 pm

Flanagan, Macken, and of course Llywelyn are great. Your son will especially like some of the Llwelyn titles of Boru, MacCool, Strongbow and the Druids.

Three others to consider are The Kings in Winter, by Cecelia Holland; The King of Claddagh, by Thomas Fitzpatrick (May be hard to find. I bought it in Limerick 20 years ago); and finally Over the Water, by Maude Casey. This last is more of a chick book. Three generations of Irish women.

If you ever want to go with straight history, Rebels, by Peter DeRosa is a fantastic portrayal of the Easter Uprising.

Happy reading,

Jack
Last edited by Jack on Sun May 31st, 2009, 8:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Lower case P on a name

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Melisende
Reader
Location: Australia

Postby Melisende » Sun June 21st, 2009, 5:34 am

"Grania" by Morgan Llywellyn

Kenneth C Flint - wrote on the early mythology of Ireland and Cuchulainn.

Iris Murdoch - wrote more of the later 19th / 20th C Ireland. She wrote an excellent one on the Easter Rising (1916) but can't remember its title; and another set just after the Potato Famine.
"For my part, I adhere to the maxim of antiquity: The throne is a glorious sepulchre."

Women of History

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Jack
Reader
Location: California

Postby Jack » Sun June 28th, 2009, 10:29 pm

Don't remember seeing it above, butanything by Randy Lee Eickhoff is great, but graphic-both sexually and violently. He deals with the ancient epics of Ireland, which were over the top in those regards. But they're fun to read.

Leena
Scribbler
Location: USA

Postby Leena » Sun October 4th, 2009, 4:41 pm

My first Morgan LLewellyn book was Druids, which also features Vercingetoirx, and followed that with The Horse Goddess. These are both very worthwhile. I gained respect for the Druids from her novel. I just finished The Lion of Ireland and will probably follow up on this.
"Years ago my mother used to say to me, she'd say, "In this world, Elwood, you must be" - she always called me Elwood - "In this world, Elwood, you must be oh so smart or oh so pleasant." Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant. You may quote me. " (Elwood P. Dowd in Harvey)

stumpy
Reader

stumpy

Postby stumpy » Sun October 4th, 2009, 8:01 pm

have you not read Rosemary Sutcliffes Hound of Ulster.very good treatment of
Cuchulain and Deidre and Patricia Finney does a good version of the same story highly recommended.
My sons enjoyed Master and commander series on tape as well.


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