Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Return of the Victorian age thriller

njslater
Scribbler
Posts: 40
Joined: March 2013
Location: London

Return of the Victorian age thriller

Post by njslater » Sat April 27th, 2013, 6:27 am

With a revival in TV dramas set in the Victorian era I think the time is set for a bit of a resurgence in interest in thrillers set in the 19th century, do you agree? I would like to think however that they could become popular away from the rather hackneyed crime novels in particular those loosely or tightly connected to the Ripper, a story line long since done to death.

My extensive research into this era has uncovered some fascinating areas of Victorian life away from the usual images of wealth and grim industrial poverty.

User avatar
Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 5707
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: "Bone China" by Laura Purcell
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Sat April 27th, 2013, 11:07 am

I notice there's a new "Suspicions of Mr Whicher" coming on TV soon - although I was bored stiff by the original book and wall-banged it after 130 pages. The TV adaptation was better, and I also enjoyed Ripper Street recently.

What else have you found? I agree the Ripper is a bit overdone.
Currently reading: "Bone China" by Laura Purcell

J.D. Oswald
Reader
Posts: 84
Joined: May 2012

Post by J.D. Oswald » Sat April 27th, 2013, 12:03 pm

Not fiction, but I bought 'Mr Briggs' Hat: A Sensational Account of Britain's First Railway Murder' for my dad recently, as he's a railway buff. He enjoyed it. There's a review at http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/ma ... hat-review

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Sun April 28th, 2013, 4:18 am

Posted by J D Oswald
Not fiction, but I bought 'Mr Briggs' Hat: A Sensational Account of Britain's First Railway Murder' for my dad recently, as he's a railway buff.
I read that a year or so back and found it really interesting and readable, in a similar way to Erik Larsen's Thunderstruck. Sometimes the truth can be as strange, or at least as intriguing, as fiction.

I've recently been reading a series of Edwardian-period mysteries by Andrew Martin, based around a Yorkshire railway policeman, which I've been enjoying- I wonder if they might appeal to your dad as well - there's quite a bit of trainspottery involved as well as detection, and most of the characters are keen subscribers to the Railway Magazine. :) The last two have been set on the Somme and in Mesopotamia during WW1.

Jim Stringer series

J.D. Oswald
Reader
Posts: 84
Joined: May 2012

Post by J.D. Oswald » Sun April 28th, 2013, 12:43 pm

[quote=""annis""]

I've recently been reading a series of Edwardian-period mysteries by Andrew Martin, based around a Yorkshire railway policeman, which I've been enjoying- I wonder if they might appeal to your dad as well - there's quite a bit of trainspottery involved as well as detection, and most of the characters are keen subscribers to the Railway Magazine. :) The last two have been set on the Somme and in Mesopotamia during WW1.

Jim Stringer series[/quote]

thanks, yes, I think he's read one or two of the Andrew Martin novels (I have too and enjoyed them). I haven't read the latest one set on the Somme - thanks for that recommendation.

User avatar
Susan
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3746
Joined: August 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Sun April 28th, 2013, 1:15 pm

I saw this soon to be published NF book on Amazon today. It must have already been published in the UK because below is a review from The Telegraph.
The Invention of Murder: How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime by Judith Flanders.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

User avatar
Divia
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4435
Joined: August 2008
Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Post by Divia » Tue April 30th, 2013, 12:23 am

Alas! We don't get those period dramas as much as you do over there. Though I do love me some Victorian stories.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

njslater
Scribbler
Posts: 40
Joined: March 2013
Location: London

Post by njslater » Sun May 5th, 2013, 4:05 pm

One reason that I chose to write in this period is the remarkable contrasts but also the great advances that were made in science and understanding, though of course neither often to the immediate advantage of the masses

Kat
Scribbler
Posts: 14
Joined: May 2013

Post by Kat » Wed June 26th, 2013, 10:19 am

[quote=""njslater""]With a revival in TV dramas set in the Victorian era I think the time is set for a bit of a resurgence in interest in thrillers set in the 19th century, do you agree? [/quote]

I think some of the new Steampunk books are leaning towards this genre. The Newbury & Hobbes series by George Mann has a few fantastical elements, but they are basically crime thrillers. The Affinity Bridge, The Osirus Ritual and The Immortality Engine are the main series books, although there are some related stories.

njslater
Scribbler
Posts: 40
Joined: March 2013
Location: London

Post by njslater » Sat July 27th, 2013, 12:52 pm

As I researched my book I discovered there were quite enough remarkable things going on in Victorian times without resorting to steampunk. For instance it is strange but true that the fore-runners of the IRA built a submarine in the 1880s in order to attack British ships.

Post Reply

Return to “Victorian”