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The Conquest *spoilers*

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LCW
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The Conquest *spoilers*

Post by LCW » Fri September 12th, 2008, 7:52 pm

OK, I'm about 50 pages into the second half of the book, after Ailith dies and Julitta is reunited with Rolf, her father. For some reason I couldn't stop bawling from the time Ailith leaves Roth right up until now. I've never cried over a Chawick book, that I can remember, but this one had me boohooing like a baby!

I did read until almost 3am so maybe I was just exausted or something! Did anyone else find this novel just incredibly heartbreaking and tearjerking? The whole disintegration of Rolf and Ailith's relationship just broke my heart. And then Julitta's reunion with her father!! Man!! Please someone tell me, it's not just me!

I have to hand it to ya, EC, you threw me for a loop! I love your novels but never really thought they packed such an emotional wallop until now!
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Fri September 12th, 2008, 8:26 pm

This is such a good book and there's so much more to come. I can't recall if I really cried but yes, the break up and then when Alith and Julitta were found by Dominik (brain lapse, I think that's his name) was just heartbreaking.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri September 12th, 2008, 8:59 pm

hmm I may have to give this one a go.
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Post by Misfit » Fri September 12th, 2008, 9:15 pm

You have to give EC at least one more whirl. I know Daughters disappointed you but she really sucks you into another century better than most others authors out there.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat September 13th, 2008, 3:27 am

Yeah, I know.

Its just when I read the write ups it seems like its more about a guy than a girl, and everyone knows that I dont like to read stories from guys POVs. *shrugs* Maybe the write ups are misleading.
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Post by Misfit » Sat September 13th, 2008, 1:23 pm

Hmmm, I don't recall it as being from the guy's POV. Maybe the first part but not the last when it told the daughter's story.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sat September 13th, 2008, 2:07 pm

No, when Iread a summary of her differnt books it always seems like "Lord so and so needs to defend blah blah blah" and I"m like eh I dotn want to read about a guy.
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LCW
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Post by LCW » Sat September 13th, 2008, 5:43 pm

Divia, I would say that's true of her more biographical novels but not her earlier ones that are based on ficitonal characters. The Conquest is told from the point of view of two women, Ailith and Julitta, who are mother and daughter.

One of the best things about her novels is that they are so descriptive that you get a really good feel for the middle ages but it's blended so well into the story that you don't feel "instructed" on life back then. Some novels can get bogged down in details or historical people coming in and out but not these. I'd give them one more try if I were you! :)
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat September 13th, 2008, 9:03 pm

[quote=""1lila1""]One of the best things about her novels is that they are so descriptive that you get a really good feel for the middle ages but it's blended so well into the story that you don't feel "instructed" on life back then. Some novels can get bogged down in details or historical people coming in and out but not these. I'd give them one more try if I were you! :) [/quote]

That's what's so magical about her books, that effortless sense of time travel. I'm always sucked into another century and never want to come back to the "real world".

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Post by EC2 » Sat September 13th, 2008, 11:30 pm

:o :
Thanks folks.
Divia - ummm...I do mix and match points of view but as you've sussed I do rather like writing in male viewpoint. :D The Conquest does have fairly strong female viewpoints but the guys get their look in too. If you feel it's not for you then it is indeed a case of too many books and too little time and you read what you want to. I spent much of my childhood pretending to be the Lone Ranger (or Silver!) so I guess I'm wired towards enjoying writing male protagonists.
IlilaI - I don't tend to re-read my books that often once they're published, so I'm sitting here thinking 'Hmm, what bit would that be then; I don't remember!' :eek: :o
I know a lot of authors who sit sobbing when they have to bid farewell to a character or write an emotional scene but I must admit I tend to feel more like a chef preparing a gourmet meal in the kitchen, with one eye through the round window on the customers in the dining room. The pleasure's in the crafting. (no emoticon for evil grin!)
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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