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Are You Wired ?

chuck
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Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Are You Wired ?

Post by chuck » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:05 am

Food for thought....The Wired Generation.... I just read a newspaper article about a few University/College Professors are assigning their classes to shut down their Ipods, Laptops/Facebook and cell phones for 48 hours....Then write a paper about their experiences.....Got me thinking how wired am I/we?...I don't listen to Ipod(listen to CDs) use the cell phone only for a emergency....but I do use the internet and visit HFF/Blogs/Facebok once a day..... With that said many of the students are in a uproar about their assignment...many are having withdrawal pains....I depend on the Internet to communicate and read/current events.....Yes.... I would really struggle without the Internet for two days....but not like Ipoders, twitters/texting/talking and Facebookers students who are really the new "The Wired Generation".....Are you part of The Wired Generation?...I admit... I'm a bit wired ..
Last edited by chuck on Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Madeleine
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Currently reading: "Pine" by Francine Toon
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Sun March 14th, 2010, 12:01 pm

I'm like you chuck, only use a mobile in case of emergency' I'm on Facebook but only really check it if someone sends me a message or I particularly want to message someone, don't possess an Ipod or Iphone or Blackberry, must admit I am a bit addicted to this site and another booksite I'm on and I do miss the net if I cant' get on it at least once a day, but hey I can cope! Those profs have a brilliant idea - I wonder if they'll tell their students how they all managed before mobiles/computers took such a hold on their lives - my generation all managed! Will be interested to hear the results of this assignment.
Currently reading: "Pine" by Francine Toon

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ejays17
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Post by ejays17 » Sun March 14th, 2010, 12:43 pm

I think i'm only partially-wired - I'm certianly less so than my husband!

I have an Ipod whihc i listen to audio-books on at the gym (but I've been really slack over this since Christmas), husband listens to his to & from work every day.
Both of us have Mobile (cell) phones, I can qute happily not even look atmine from one ed of the week to the other, he gets twitchy if it's not within arms-reach at all times (even though he rarely gets calls or messages from people)
He maintains 2 blogs, and has about a half-dozen sites he visits every day. I check my mail when i think about it, and visit 2 sites (one is this) when I'm online, and that's not necessarily rvery day.

I would be very interested to hear bout the results of the assignment, whether they can cope with being "disconnected" for 48 hours.
"Logic, my dear Zoe, merely enables one to be wrong with authority." The Doctor, Wheel in Space

SLOC: Solid Lump of Comfort (from the Chalet School books by Elinor M Brent-Dyer)

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sun March 14th, 2010, 1:26 pm

[quote=""Madeleine""]I'm like you chuck, only use a mobile in case of emergency' I'm on Facebook but only really check it if someone sends me a message or I particularly want to message someone, don't possess an Ipod or Iphone or Blackberry, must admit I am a bit addicted to this site and another booksite I'm on and I do miss the net if I cant' get on it at least once a day, but hey I can cope! Those profs have a brilliant idea - I wonder if they'll tell their students how they all managed before mobiles/computers took such a hold on their lives - my generation all managed! Will be interested to hear the results of this assignment.[/quote]

I'm with you. I'd go crazy without the net to check HFO and Goodreads but otherwise I'd live. I check FB when I remember to, but originally I signed up because I was getting hits of long-lost deadbeat customers on some of these networking sites and I needed as account :rolleyes:
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Sun March 14th, 2010, 2:30 pm

I'd die if I didnt have internet. I'm addicted and I know it. :D

I'm not that attached to my cell phone or my ipod(save when I am working out or walking)
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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Sun March 14th, 2010, 3:45 pm

I have a cell phone but don't have it on all the time. When I do, it's to call people. I'll read text messages if someone sends me one.
I have a Mac book and Ipod but they stay at home. I still enjoy listening to CDs.
Can't live without the web either! LinkedIn.com is great for professional networking and seeing fellow alumni from my undergrad and grad schools. I have my share of blogs and listservs that I read.
Still it's nice to take a break from it periodically.

chuck
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Post by chuck » Sun March 14th, 2010, 4:47 pm

It helps to have HF kindred souls who also are a bit addicted...But seem in control and can find other outlets to find that human connection.....Moderation in everything is my mantra...except for HF/NF/films/music...Ahem....

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:08 pm

Hmm, I know I functioned quite adequately without the Internet, but now it makes what I do (freelance journalism) possible. Before the Net, I would have to go to a library and scroll through microfilms, hunt through lateral files and check corporate filings in person. Now I can do it all online in 1/10 of the time. That means I can be efficient -- and have time for myself, to boot.

I love my iPod, but mostly because it allows me to create playlists, which is something I had always longed to do. I can structure playlists for moods, situations (long plane flights), etc, and don't have to carry a big bunch of CDs with me when I travel. My Kindle is similarly utilitarian -- it's cheaper buying books, easier buying books, I have a portable library of 600 books that looks like one trade paperback and I don't need to worry about bookshelf or storage space. Facebook has reconnected me (and allowed me to stay in touch) with friends scattered worldwide. Nope, I'm not going to spend two or three hours a day writing letters to each of them -- none of us have that kind of time any more. (And even in the 70s, I remember my mother, when we started moving abroad, slowly lost a lot of friendships simply because they weren't as happy picking up a pen as she was.)

When technology allows me to transcend time and space, and gives me more free time to pursue my passions and pastimes, I love it. When it becomes an end in itself, that's something completely different. I don't have a Blackberry because I don't need it. I barely use my cellphone, unless I'm traveling -- that is a utilitarian device for me. I don't need 10,000 apps. It's all about utilitarian vs distraction.

I'm not sure that going Internet cold turkey would be useful for me -- I'm 48 and remember what that was like. (And occasionally it was damn frustrating, let me tell you.) But for the current generation -- if only to remind them of the transformative power of a technology that they believe has always been here -- I think it's probably a valuable exercise.

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:56 pm

The internet has spoiled me for things like shopping for items that involved a lot of research and going from store to store before I found what I wanted, paying bills (don't miss writing and mailing checks, and about the only time I use the PO is when I'm trading books) and for news.

I work all day long with applications and micromanaging types, so when I get home I relish time to myself, unconnected. I have an ordinary cell phone (no bells and whistles) and I only use it for emergencies and the occasional call to hubby for the quick honey-do items, such as can you pick up milk on the way home, etc. It's usually in my purse and off when I'm not using it. I don't text. I received an iPod a few years ago, but have never used it. All our music is stored on the PC at home, I can play it from any of our three computers (office, entertainment center, daughter's PC). In the car, I listen to my CDs, on the train I read my books, and I don't work in an office where you can listen to music and do your job. I don't tweet, don't even have a twitter account, and I haven't signed up for Facebook (just not my style and am not really interested in it). I really only check my blog feeds about once a week (I've found if you sign up for too many, you're just getting a lot of fluff and repetition anyway).

I do sneak peak at forums while I work. My job is so tedious and monotonous it saves my sanity to be able to take a mental break and actually converse with adults about something that interests me. At home I'm dealing with kids, and at work I'm dealing with executives who sometimes behave like kids, so forums are often my only opportunity to have adult conversations. I try to keep my online activities in moderation.

What disturbs me about today's society is this mentality of instant gratification we have toward everything (stop what you're doing now, pay attention to me now, I want that before I've even earned the money to pay for it, etc.). What really puts me over the edge is the constant push toward multitasking and interrupting people all day long with all these gadgets which often duplicate one another. Studies have shown the human mind works better when focusing on one thing at a time. Younger people multitask better than older people, and technology keeps pushing the limit on how many items one person can reasonably deal with simultaneously. And yet, we keep designing gadgets and applications to encourage multitasking, and those who don't get left behind. Quantity and rabid consumption are valued over quality. It gives me mental vertigo.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sun March 14th, 2010, 10:33 pm

I have an ipod. I have a netbook. But most of my computing is done on my desktop. My cell stays in the car, but then, I'm usually near the land-line, so why bother with the cell?

Several times a year, and at least once a day, I need to go somewhere there the only person who can get ahold of me is God. Fortunately, he tends to stick to universal, timeless things and leave the instant out -- unless it's a rattlesnake on the trail or a hailstorm.

I do appreciate all the things that this incredible connectivity does for me, the efficiencies and the information now at my fingertips. But it can be a terrible distraction!

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