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College decisions

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 2:09 am

I have no children, but I always tell my students to think of the degree and cost. They dont like to hear the second part, but its important. If you can go to a community college, and then go to a 4 year you can save big bucks. I always encourage my students to do this because I'll be paying off my college debt until I am 70
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michellemoran
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Post by michellemoran » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 3:27 am

I went to law school at thirty-five or so. Aside from having clothes older than some of my classmates, it was fun.
HAH! So there is hope ;)
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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 6:56 am

Hey, Michelle, do you have any experience with UC Irvine? Daughter was accepted there, although we're a bit wary of a large state school.
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SarahWoodbury
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Post by SarahWoodbury » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 3:40 pm

Both my children are spending time at the local community college while they are technically in high school. My son, who's only a sophomore enrolled this year in a charter school that pays for the college and he will graduate at 18 with a high school diploma and an AA, without ever having sat in a high school classroom. Both Washington State and Oregon have programs like these and they have been fabulous for my kids (and for my bottom line).

On a total side note, my dad taught at UC Irvine many years ago. He almost got fired for his radical (at the time) political views so we moved to Washington State. I'm sure it is nothing like we knew then.

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 3:53 pm

I went to MA for undergrad. My dad's family was in CT and MA so it wasn't too bad. My mom didn't like the long drives to get to my college. I flew home for all school breaks. I went without a car until my final semester when I had an internship in the next town over.
My dad started saving money for college when I was little and there was still enough left over when I went to grad school. Plus I got a scholarship so that helped too.

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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 4:34 pm

Sarah, sounds like a great program your son is in! And congratulations to your daughter--it sounds like you found a good fit. Mine got into a good school about 45 min away, but the financial aid package wasn't very good, so it's not a top option anymore. I won't worry too much if she goes to SC since we have relatives there in case of emergency.

I'd always heard UCIrvine was one of the more "conservative" UC's, so I'm not surprised to hear your dad's story!
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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 5:25 pm

Michelle, one of the huge benefits of going to school after the traditional age is that you know the value of both money and an education and are much more likely to pay attention in class, study effectively out of class and do a good job on the assignments. One gets more out of the process because (a) one takes it more seriously and (b) has more fun!

I've done both - I went straight on to college after high school, but later also took courses in various subjects as an independent student. While I did get a lot of benefit from my undergraduate experience, I think I got just as much or more out of my later schooling, even though it didn't lead to any graduate degrees.
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Leyland
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Post by Leyland » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 5:50 pm

[quote=""Margaret""]Michelle, one of the huge benefits of going to school after the traditional age is that you know the value of both money and an education and are much more likely to pay attention in class, study effectively out of class and do a good job on the assignments. One gets more out of the process because (a) one takes it more seriously and (b) has more fun!
[/quote]
True! It takes a certain amount of self-discipline, but studying outside of class more effectively now has been the biggest difference between being a full time younger student and whatever I am now. This probably has much to do with having worked full time for over 20 years and now knowing what to do to get the project or course completed responsibly (or no more paycheck).

I intend to buy the Becker CPA self study CD review course and immerse myself in practicing for the exam all of July, August and September. I'd like to take all four parts in October and November. Most definitely an out of class experience coming my way. ;)
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michellemoran
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Post by michellemoran » Fri April 3rd, 2009, 10:29 pm

Michelle, one of the huge benefits of going to school after the traditional age is that you know the value of both money and an education and are much more likely to pay attention in class, study effectively out of class and do a good job on the assignments. One gets more out of the process because (a) one takes it more seriously and (b) has more fun!
Great point Margaret. When my husband visited one of the top three colleges, most of the students were surfing icanhascheezburger and similar such sites on their laptops! As a visiting student, he was paying more attention than most of the students were!

And Julianne, unfortunately, I don't know much about Irvine. I do know it's a huge school and in a very nice area though!
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Kasthu
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Post by Kasthu » Sat April 4th, 2009, 12:09 am

[quote=""Margaret""]Michelle, one of the huge benefits of going to school after the traditional age is that you know the value of both money and an education and are much more likely to pay attention in class, study effectively out of class and do a good job on the assignments. One gets more out of the process because (a) one takes it more seriously and (b) has more fun!

I've done both - I went straight on to college after high school, but later also took courses in various subjects as an independent student. While I did get a lot of benefit from my undergraduate experience, I think I got just as much or more out of my later schooling, even though it didn't lead to any graduate degrees.[/quote]

So true about that! I think if I'd gone to grad school right out of undergrad, I wouldn't have appreciated it so much. Now that I'm out in the working world, and taking a few continuing ed courses, I'm considering going back to school for a masters in medieval history. My sister went to grad school right out of college; and not to rag on her or anything, but she doesn't appreciate it quite as much as I would now in that situation.

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