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July 2014. What are you reading?

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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Brenna
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Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Mon July 7th, 2014, 6:57 pm

[quote=""Misfit""]Hi stranger, long time no see :)

I just started Imperial Scandal by Teresa Grant, Napoleonic era. I also downloaded Empire by Gore Vidal.[/quote]

I love Grant's series on Malcolm and Suzanne!

Reaching EC's The Summer Queen and almost done. Waiting to read the Author's Note before offering any comment.
Brenna

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Misfit
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Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Mon July 7th, 2014, 7:57 pm

[quote=""Brenna""]I love Grant's series on Malcolm and Suzanne!

Reaching EC's The Summer Queen and almost done. Waiting to read the Author's Note before offering any comment.[/quote]

I should have got back to this series a long time ago.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Gordopolis
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Post by Gordopolis » Tue July 8th, 2014, 10:30 am

I was intrigued by the dichotomy of reviews (on Amazon at least) for Stewart Binns' 'Conquest'. I decided to give it a go to see for myself, and it really is something of an enigma.
The books starts off with some beautiful prose, describing the imperial guards and potential heirs to Alexios I Komnenos of Byzantium coming to a remote Greek island to seek out an old man and some profound knowledge he holds. This first section had me utterly gripped, and I was somewhat jealous of the author's deft storytelling.
Then we come to the protagonist of the tale, Hereward of Bourne - some thirty years before the book's opening. Here, the detail and involvement continues, but only for a short few chapters. Swiftly, Hereward's gradually materialising character - his motivations, strengths and faults - is set to one side, and the next quarter of the book 'zooms out' to an omniscient view of Hereward's journey across Medieval Europe. Just a few pages are spent at each of his destinations - Novgorod, Constantinople, Rome, Sicily - when they warranted at least chapters or even volumes, especially when the hero met the likes of the Pope, the kings, emperors and dukes of each of his stopovers. Swift, stock dialogue with the Pope of Rome did little to aid plausability. At this point, my heart was swinging away from the book, and I began to understand the 'marmite' nature of the reviews.
Then, when Hereward returned to England, the author thankfully put the brakes on again, and the narrative settled into a pace somewhere in between the beautiful start and the rushed middle. I'm currently reading and enjoying the final third, telling the tale of the Battle of Hastings, and I'm now pretty sure I'll try the second book in the series (as long as the ending to this one holds up well).

Anyway, a bit of a rambling post, but I don't think I've read a book that has pushed me from pillar to post quite as much as this one. Anyone else read it?

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Tue July 8th, 2014, 12:12 pm

Alias Hook by Lisa Jensen

Description from publisher: Meet Captain James Benjamin Hook, a witty, educated Restoration-era privateer cursed to play villain to a pack of malicious little boys in a pointless war that never ends. But everything changes when Stella Parrish, a forbidden grown woman, dreams her way to the Neverland in defiance of Pan’s rules.

An alternative telling of what went on in Neverland from Captain Hook's point of view. Sounds fun! The last thing my 7th grade classes wrote this past school year was a retelling of a fairy tale from another character's perspective. They has a blast!
~Susan~
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Leyland
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Location: Travelers Rest SC

Post by Leyland » Tue July 8th, 2014, 12:20 pm

[quote=""Misfit""]Hi stranger, long time no see :)

I just started Imperial Scandal by Teresa Grant, Napoleonic era. I also downloaded Empire by Gore Vidal.[/quote]
Hi! Never am too far away and always happy to be back ;)
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

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Madeleine
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Currently reading: "The Dark is Rising" by Susan Cooper & "The Christmas Railway Mystery" by Edward Marston
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Tue July 8th, 2014, 1:42 pm

The Sanctuary Seeker by Bernard Knight - Devon 1194, first in a crime series (the Crowner John novels).
Currently reading "The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper & "The Christmas Railway Mystery" by Edward Marston

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Lisa
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Favourite HF book: Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman
Preferred HF: Any time period/location. Timeslip, usually prefer female POV. Also love Gothic melodrama.
Location: Northeast Scotland

Post by Lisa » Tue July 8th, 2014, 3:21 pm

I'm about 20% through A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin.

I've never read any of the books or watched the TV series, and I've been avoiding all spoilers like the plague, so I'm enjoying this!

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Divia
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Location: Always Cloudy, Central New York

Post by Divia » Tue July 8th, 2014, 4:05 pm

emily of New Moon. A classic, but I never read it so I'm giving it a go.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Tue July 8th, 2014, 4:19 pm

[quote=""Divia""]emily of New Moon. A classic, but I never read it so I'm giving it a go.[/quote]
I read the whole "Emily" trilogy years ago and still have it. Montgomery wrote these after the Anne of Green Gables series.

There was also a TV series of the same name based on the 1st novel.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue July 8th, 2014, 8:55 pm

[quote=""princess garnet""]I read the whole "Emily" trilogy years ago and still have it. Montgomery wrote these after the Anne of Green Gables series.

There was also a TV series of the same name based on the 1st novel.[/quote]

I'm finding Emily kinda annoying. Maybe its because she is 10 and there is a big age difference between us :D I'm hoping the others maybe better.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
http://yabookmarks.blogspot.com/

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