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March 2012 Feature of the Month: Trojan War Month

A monthly discussion on varying themes guided by our members. (Book of the Month discussions through December 2011 can be found in this section too.)
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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Mon March 12th, 2012, 11:39 pm

[quote=""Nefret""]I haven't seen that series.[/quote]

You should. Highly recommended.

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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Tue March 13th, 2012, 5:10 am

This evening in the library, I found... War at Troy: What Homer Didn't Tell by Quintus Smyrnaeus.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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parthianbow
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Post by parthianbow » Tue March 13th, 2012, 9:50 am

[quote=""The Czar""]I've always liked the duel of Hector and Achilles.

That "scene" is the only thing that even slightly redeems the Brad Pitt as Achilles movie version from a few years ago.


Funny story...

Once time, some friends and I went to see a movie. As we were lushes back then, we snuck a few "call a cab's" (a frozen concoction starring Pure Grain Alcohol) into the theatre from the place next door.

So our movie ended, and we were feeling no pain. Another movie, "Troy" as it turned out, ended at the same time.

So we're walking out of the theatre, and I overhear some guy saying "I wonder if that's where they got Trojan Horse from?"

"Yes, and achillies heel, beware of greeks bearing gifts, and a host of other sayings too. Oh, and I suspect the name of Trojan condoms is based on the impenetrable walls of Illium. Moron." I shout back, as my friends hustle me from the theatre before I get a beating.

A smartass book snob + alcohol + morons = a bad situation.[/quote]

Very funny! :D :) :D :D
Ben Kane
Bestselling author of Roman military fiction.
Spartacus - UK release 19 Jan. 2012. US release June 2012.

http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Tue March 13th, 2012, 7:19 pm

Picked up Daughter of Troy on Kindle last night. A Briseis bodice ripper. I'm intrigued.

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Wed March 14th, 2012, 1:12 am

Reconstructions of the some of the prominent Mycenaean citadels and Minoan palaces of the period:

Akrotiri, an ancient Minoan harbor town on Santorini:

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The palace/temple complex of Knossos:
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Mycenae: as seen from the Chavos Ravine on the east:
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An eagle's eye view of Mycenae:
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The Great Court of Pylos:
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The Minoans built multi-level structures, sometimes with up to five or six floors. Mycenaean structures lack some Minoan architectural details. The Mycenaeans did not incorporate the pillar crypt or the tripartite shrine into their palaces or cult spaces. The basic house plan, whether for a humble dwelling or a palace, was the three-room megaron. In the Mycenaean citadel, the megaron, rather than the Minoan great court, was the center of attraction, and it appears, from the available evidence, that the Mycenaeans did not build higher than two or three stories.

If you would like more specific details on building structures such as the megaron and shrine, or have any other questions, please post. I mean to keep this thread lively until 11:59 pm March 31.

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Post by annis » Wed March 14th, 2012, 1:50 am

My oldest son was lucky enough to visit the site of the Temple of Knossos when he was in Crete a year or two back and was very impressed. He also followed the arduous track through the Imbros Gorge taken by Allied soldiers to escape the Germans after the Battle of Crete in 1941 - his grandfather among them.

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Wed March 14th, 2012, 1:51 pm

Re some other literary connections:

I've always assumed Frank Herbert's House of Atreides in Dune was a deliberate homage to the House of Atreus. I think there are conflicting opinions as to whether he meant for them to be direct descendants. I've only read the first book in that series, so I don't know if he got more specific in some of his later books before he died and his son in collaboration with Anderson took over the series.

For me, one of the most memorable and stunning scenes in Mika Waltari's The Egyptian takes place in Crete and involves the labyrinth and sacrifice to the Minotaur.

Random thoughts on the Iliad and Odyssey:

When I was reading some of these Greek myths to my kids, I was struck by how much the Apple of Discord tale resembles the beginning of Sleeping Beauty with the Goddess of Discord standing in as the evil fairy. I also had forgotten how much screen time Telemachus has in the Odyssey. We often think of Penelope waiting all those years for her husband, but an equally important part of that story is the son's search for his missing father.

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Wed March 14th, 2012, 7:41 pm

[quote=""Ludmilla""]Re some other literary connections:

I've always assumed Frank Herbert's House of Atreides in Dune was a deliberate homage to the House of Atreus. I think there are conflicting opinions as to whether he meant for them to be direct descendants. I've only read the first book in that series, so I don't know if he got more specific in some of his later books before he died and his son in collaboration with Anderson took over the series.

For me, one of the most memorable and stunning scenes in Mika Waltari's The Egyptian takes place in Crete and involves the labyrinth and sacrifice to the Minotaur.

Random thoughts on the Iliad and Odyssey:

When I was reading some of these Greek myths to my kids, I was struck by how much the Apple of Discord tale resembles the beginning of Sleeping Beauty with the Goddess of Discord standing in as the evil fairy. I also had forgotten how much screen time Telemachus has in the Odyssey. We often think of Penelope waiting all those years for her husband, but an equally important part of that story is the son's search for his missing father.[/quote]

House Atreides in Dune is descended from the Titan Agamemnon, through Vorian Atreides. I can't quite recall whether there's any talk of descent from the actual Atreidai. That would be quite difficult, if not impossible, to verify.

Telemachus in The Odyssey does an awful lot of whining, though.
Last edited by lauragill on Wed March 14th, 2012, 7:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Wed March 14th, 2012, 10:50 pm

These Minoan and Mycenaean seal rings are so detailed and precise that they were either done by someone with very, very sharp eyes, or with the aid of a Bronze Age magnifying glass. Surprisingly, evidence for the latter has been found for the Middle Minoan period.

The similarity between Minoan and Mycenaean styles here indicates that the Mycenaeans probably brought Minoan artists to mainland Greece when they conquered Crete around 1450 B.C.

Image

Image

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Lastly, a child's ring found at Thebes:
Image

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Post by TiciaRoma » Fri March 23rd, 2012, 1:17 am

[quote=""lauragill""]Reconstructions of the some of the prominent Mycenaean citadels and Minoan palaces of the period: [/quote]

Thank you for these pictures, Laura. I just finished (and loved!) Helen's Daughter and it's great to have some visuals to go along with the pictures in my mind.

So far I've read Lavinia, Black Ships of Troy, and Helen's Daughter. They have re-sparked my interest in the period. I'm hoping to read The Young Lion and re-read The King Must Die before Trojan month ends.
Tish

"If you would tell me the heart of a man, tell me not what he reads but what he rereads." Nobel Laureate Francois Mauriac

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