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The Boleyn King by Laura Andersen

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Wed August 7th, 2013, 6:48 pm

[quote=""DanielAWillis""]I will be the author, but I have not started writing it save a basic outline so far.

The general premise and history change will be she insists on changing the succession to allow first born regardless of gender. This will make Pss Vicky her heiress-apparent and that has profound rippling effects on world history. Hint: no Kaiser Bill.[/quote]

Aha! That would have had quite a profound effect!
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

DanielAWillis
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Post by DanielAWillis » Tue August 13th, 2013, 3:15 pm

[quote=""Susan""]The Boleyn King by Laura Andersen

I've been pretty much Tudored out and do not read many Tudor novels anymore, but this one is a bit different. It is an alternate history novel based on the premise that Anne Boleyn did not miscarry a son, was not beheaded, and so remained married to Henry VIII. Henry and Anne's son has succeeded his father and is one of the main characters along with his sister Elizabeth and two fictional characters. Lots of historical people are in the novel: Robert Dudley, Jane Grey, Mary Tudor, George Boleyn, Duke of Norfolk, Duke of Northumberland, and Henri II of France among others. The author creates a plausible Tudor world, but because it is alternate history, the reader is not quite sure what is going to happen and that's what I like about it. I did catch a couple of errors which I am pretty sure are errors and not alternate history: (1) The wife of Henri II of France was Catherine de'Medici not Marie de'Medici (she was married to Henri IV of France) (2) There is mention of Richard VI being murdered in the Tower and it was Henry VI. This is the first book of a trilogy and I am engaged enough to be eagerly awaiting the second book.[/quote]

The smaller goofs like you point out do not bother so much unless they become a major point in the story. I am still reading this books and so far they have not.

However, there is one big goof made that has put me off. At one point, the King of England is befriending the Dutch in an effort to force a treaty with France. The problem here is the year is 1553 and the King supposedly writes to the Queen of the Netherlands. In 1553, the Low Counties were under the control of King Felipe II of Spain, the very country that England is working against in these efforts.

The Kingdom of the Netherlands was not formed in the 19th century. So technically, the "Queen of the Netherlands" was the Queen of Spain, but in 1553, King Felipe was a widower and had not yet remarried.
Daniel A. Willis
Author: Chronicle of the Mages series
www.DanielAWillis.com

DanielAWillis
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Finished it. Loved it.

Post by DanielAWillis » Mon August 19th, 2013, 1:04 pm

Okay, finished the book and found it quite enjoyable. This is what I call a "beach book." That is, a book I can take and lazily read on vacation or while commuting to/from the office. It tells a rather compact story with just enough twists and turns to be enjoyable, but not so many you feel the need to take notes. Also, Tudor dramas tend to get bogged down in either descriptive prose or a never-ending prattle of secondary characters not really needed to make the story. This book avoids both. Brevity of description is a personal preference of mine. If you like deep rich descriptions of every room a person in the book enters, this is not the book for you. I refer to being overly descriptive as "Anne Ricing the details" (I swear that woman could easily spend a chapter describing a dead tree).

As already pointed out, the historical errors were not part of the main plot, so don't annoy me quite as much. In fact, they were so inconsequential to the story, the editors should consider simply removing them in future editions. Would not affect the story one iota.

It is a refreshing book for those burned out on Tudor drama. Because the central royal figure is mythical (hence the "alternate" history) the dynamics of how the rest of the family relate to one another is new. Just an all-around fun read. I'm looking forward to the sequel, which I believe comes out in the fall.
Last edited by DanielAWillis on Mon August 19th, 2013, 1:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Daniel A. Willis
Author: Chronicle of the Mages series
www.DanielAWillis.com

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Thu July 31st, 2014, 12:51 am

Finished the trilogy...last book is The Boleyn Reckoning. Now that's the way to end a trilogy! My previous book was the last book in Deborah Harkness' All Souls trilogy and I was disappointed. I am very familiar with the real Tudors and their courtiers, but with this alternative history I was on the edge of my seat. Many plot twists, surprises,etc. Don't want to say too much. One thing to nitpick...Frances Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk, Jane Grey's mother would be the first cousin of Henry VIII's children, not their aunt. She was the child of Henry VIII's sister Mary.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

DanielAWillis
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Finished the triology

Post by DanielAWillis » Sat August 16th, 2014, 9:09 pm

I have finished reading the trilogy and absolutely loved it. I rarely buy books as soon as they come out, mostly because I forget to watch for their release. This was different.

After Book2 (Boleyn Deception), I couldn't wait for the third book. I was not disappointed. Ms Andersen masterfully brought the story full circle, wrapped up all the loose ends, and gave us an ending that can be an ending its own right or perhaps lay the groundwork for future books from this world.

The few historical foibles in Book1 seem to have isolated incidents, I did not notice any from the following 2 books. Perhaps the author learned her lesson about double checking those things after having a Dutch queen in 1553. :p

If you are the type to be turned off by those kind of errors, I would still recommend this series because they do disappear and the story itself is well worth the read!
Daniel A. Willis
Author: Chronicle of the Mages series
www.DanielAWillis.com

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