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New Article on Sir Thomas More

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Greg
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New Article on Sir Thomas More

Post by Greg » Sun April 10th, 2011, 3:18 am

To all the members of Historical Fiction, first thank you for the kind welcome, secondly just a quick note to let you know I’ve put up an article on that famous Tudor figure Sir Thomas More. I am afraid to some of you that it may contradict a number of the modern myths that have sprung up around the Tudor Period Politian, Lawyer and Royal servant. For that you have my apologies, however I believe that a more realistic examination of the crucial position of Sir Thomas More may hold the key to understanding Henry VIII’s later actions.
Regards Greg
http://rednedtudormysteries.blogspot.co ... -more.html

SGM
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Post by SGM » Sun April 10th, 2011, 9:05 am

Interesting article.

Of course fiction does often create very misleading pictures of some of these historical figures. I mean, I knew from a very early age that Richelieu was a baddie - I had read The Three Musketeers. But was very surprised decades later when studying 17th century French history that he was viewed really rather differently.

I have just finished reading the Hopper book on Thomas Fairfax (and he, too, describes the three earlier biographies as hagiography). It turns out in this case that the pervading image of Fairfax was, in fact, a construct of the press in a "no news week" -- or in this case, season) using a very particular imagery to appeal to a certain type of reader of the time. This was, of course, assisted to some extent to an amount of Whiggery pokery when his memoirs were published after his death towards the end of the 17th century. The earlier biographers did not mention the alternative picture provided by the other side that he was a "cuckold" and a "stooge" which was probably equally as untrue.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

Greg
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Rre Sir Thomas More Article

Post by Greg » Sun April 10th, 2011, 11:16 am

Interesting article.

Of course fiction does often create very misleading pictures of some of these historical figures. I mean, I knew from a very early age that Richelieu was a baddie - I had read The Three Musketeers. But was very surprised decades later when studying 17th century French history that he was viewed really rather differently.


Thanks for that, yes I can definately see your point, I found that due to the saint-hood I had to approach the whole Sir Thomas More issue very very carefully. Lots of people know about the much much later religious elevation and his execution, but forget that for all of More's life he was the typical Tudor politician and lawyer. I'm going to try and put up one article on More a month to build up my case.
Regards Greg

http://rednedtudormysteries.blogspot.com/

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