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Vanessa’s 2019 Reads

What have you read this year? Post your list here and update it as you go along! (One thread per member, please.)
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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4155
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Catherine Howard Conspiracy by Alexandra Walsh
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Vanessa’s 2019 Reads

Post by Vanessa » Fri February 1st, 2019, 11:28 am

Here’s my list for January:

Seven Days of Us by Francesca Hornak. 5
This is set during Christmas at the home of the Birch family. When the eldest daughter returns home from Liberia where she has been treating patients with a contagious disease, she has to go into quarantine for a week. Her family decide to spend the time with her and they all have their own secrets. I loved this book! The family dynamics are brilliantly portrayed and I think being cooped up would send anyone mad!

Melmoth by Sarah Perry 3
This is rather an odd book. It’s about a woman called Helen who did something which she can’t forgive herself for 20 years ago. Into her possession comes a manuscript about sightings of a strange being all dressed in black with staring eyes and bleeding feet who roams the earth looking for the lonely and the guilty. It’s beautifully written with some great descriptions but I found it a little disappointing, it didn’t really grip me for some reason. I loved The Essex Serpent but sadly Melmoth didn’t live up to it for me.

The Flower Girls by Alice Clark Platts 5
A gripping tale of suspense with a spine tingling ending! Twenty years ago a two year old girl was found dead after being abducted by two young girls. Ten year old Laurel Bowman was found guilty of her murder, whilst her six year old sister, Primrose, due to her age, wasn’t considered criminally responsible and was allowed to go free. These girls became known as ‘the Flower Girls’ Now another young child goes missing at a hotel in Devon on New Year’s Eve where one of the Flower Girls is staying under a new identity. Is she responsible? I thoroughly enjoyed this story. I read it via the Pigeonhole app in staves and found I was eagerly awaiting each stave to arrive every day. It’s very much a page turner where the question of ‘is it nature or nurture’ springs to mind, as well as how do we actually know if someone is telling the truth. To me this tale read quite like a horror story at times, or even an episode from ‘Tales of the Unexpected’, especially as I began to realise that all was not as it seemed. This is a cracking read which held my attention throughout, right until the chilling end. I look forward to reading more by this author.

An Abiding Fire by M L Logue 4
This is the first in the Thomazine and Thankful Russell historical thrillers set in Restoration London. In this enjoyable mystery Thankful finds himself under suspicion of murder and treason and the race is on to clear his name. An exciting and entertaining romp set during, in my opinion, a hugely interesting time in history. I love the characters of the spirited Thomazine and her stoic and lovable husband, Thankful The - they are a delight and very memorable! The style of writing is lively, engaging and amusing. There is also a good sense of time and place. This is a good introduction to what promises to be, I’m sure, a dynamic new detective duo and I look forward to reading more of the Russells’ fascinating adventures.

Hidden Company by S E England 5
A sinister but captivating dual timeframe horror story set in Wales. In 1893 a 19 year old girl is admitted into an asylum which has some dark, dark secrets, whilst in the present day a 41 year old woman takes up residence in the gatehouse to the same asylum to recover from psychic attacks only to be haunted by some disturbing visions. This is quite a scary, unsettling and creepy tale with ghostly elements. It’s also a story of superstitions, myths and the fae people. The writing is very atmospheric and it’s so easy to visualise the setting. There is an underlying air of menace throughout which kept me on my toes. What a horrific place this asylum is! If you weren’t mad when you went in, you surely would be by the end of your stay if you managed to survive! With some fantastic characters and a great twist at the end, this is another gripping, spine-chilling and nerve-racking read from Sarah England. Not for the faint-hearted or those of a nervous disposition!

You, Me & Mr Blue Sky by Elisa Lorene & Craig Lancaster 5
What a great little read! This is a lovely, heartwarming and gentle story about two confused and vulnerable people and their quirky guardian angel. Although it is in many ways quite lighthearted, there is a serious thread running through it and it has something to tell the reader about relationships and life. It’s beautifully and perceptively written with realistic and likeable characters. I found it quite the page turner. An entertaining and amusing but meaningful and insightful tale which I thoroughly enjoyed and can highly recommend.

The Reader on the 6.27 by Jean-Paul Didierlaurent. 4
This is about a man who works in a book pulping factory and every day, on his train journey to work, he reads aloud those extracts he has rescued from the pulping machine to the passengers on his train. One day he finds a diary belong to a young woman and from then on he becomes obsessed with finding her. This is certainly a different and quirky story, but I enjoyed it. It’s an easy and amusing read.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4155
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Catherine Howard Conspiracy by Alexandra Walsh
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

February

Post by Vanessa » Sat March 2nd, 2019, 10:51 am

Here’s my list for February:

The Sewing Machine by Natalie Fergie 5
This is a multiple timeline and a multi-generational type of story, beginning in 1911 in the Singer Sewing Machine factory in Clydebank. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and thought it was well researched. It’s a great story and I liked reading about some of the history behind the Singer factory. I thought it was quite cleverly written and a little sad in places. I can recommend it as a very enjoyable little read, especially if you enjoy social history.

The Song of the Shuttle by Christine Evans. 4
This is an interesting family saga set mainly in a Lancashire mill town during the 1860s and partly in the American South, Washington and New York. It touches on the American Civil War, its impact on cotton production in Britain and how it affected the lives of the mill workers and drove them into poverty due to the British government’s opposition to slavery. Song of the Shuttle is written in quite a straightforward, ‘no frills’ way which made for easy and enjoyable reading. I found it an engaging tale and it held my attention throughout. The story deals with a part of history which I know little about and I feel as if I have learnt something! I liked the characters, especially Jessie, one of the mill girls, and Honora, a relation of a mill owner. Two spirited and forward thinking young women. If you like a saga which contains a hint of adventure, a splash of romance and a good smattering of historical fact, you’ll enjoy this debut, the first in a trilogy!

Gallowstree Lane by Kate London. 3
I read Gallowstree Lane via the Pigeonhole app in ten daily staves. I didn’t realise it was the third in a series so don’t know whether this fact affected my enjoyment as I haven’t read the first two books. I think this is an intelligent and interesting police procedural thriller about gang crime, but overall I can’t say it grabbed me. It’s written in a very realistic and gritty way, but I found it a little tedious in places. My attention kept wandering. I also didn’t particularly care for most of the characters. This book has some great 4 and 5 star reviews so I think, basically, it’s just not my personal cup of tea.

Murder in Park Lane by Karen Charlton. 4
This is the fifth in the delightful Detective Lavender and Constable Woods series set in Regency London. A man is found murdered in his lodgings, a locked door conundrum, and this leads our dynamic duo on quite a trail. I very much enjoyed this entertaining tale of suspense which has all the required ingredients for a great read. It has a clever plot, it’s fast paced, full of twists and turns, and has the odd red herring. There’s a great sense of time and place and the characters are well rounded. It’s not without its humour, either. An easy, engaging and intriguing historical mystery which will keep you guessing - I look forward to the sixth instalment!

Where the Dead Walk by John Bowen. 4
A creepy story about a supernatural TV show and the strange house the presenters are asked to investigate which appears to have a spirit contained within its walls. When I first started this book I thought it was going to be just a haunted house story. It ended up being a tale of the unexpected and entering into the realms of a Dennis Wheatley novel. Not that I didn’t enjoy it, I did! It’s imaginatively written and quite the page turner in its way. It’s mostly fast paced although some of it seemed a little repetitive. I liked the characters of the TV presenters, Kate and Henry - I thought they were well drawn and realistic. The house’s enigmatic owner, Sebastian Dahl, was suitably menacing and charming all at the same time. All in all I found it a compelling, atmospheric and unearthly, if a little fantastical, tale. It is sure to appeal to those who enjoy a little black magic mixed in with the odd ghostly element in their reading material. Beware! Some people are not always who they seem. 😱

One Minute Later by Susan Lewis. 5
Everything can change in a moment. Whilst celebrating her 27th birthday Vivienne Shager collapses from heart failure at a popular restaurant in London and this alters the course of her life. This is a beautiful and moving story written by one of my favourite authors. It takes the reader on quite an emotional journey which is both heartbreaking and uplifting at the same time. It combines fact with fiction and highlights the need for more people to get themselves on the organ donor list. It’s well written and researched with some realistic and likeable characters. It’s also a tearjerker so don’t forget your tissues! A compelling and gripping read which I thoroughly enjoyed and can recommend.

The Firemaker by Peter May. 4
The first in the Li Yan and Margaret Campbell thrillers set in China. It’s about genetic engineering and what could happen if scientists got it wrong. I wasn’t sure I was going to enjoy this one but I ended up being pleasantly surprised. I found it interesting and I loved the setting, I could picture it quite easily in my mind’s eye. I thought it was well written and researched. There’s an interesting plot line and I liked the characters. It’s quite a gripping thriller - it had me turning the pages anyway. I didn’t want to put it down at times.

The Girl Next Door by Phoebe Morgan. 4.5
A gripping psychological thriller set in a close knit community. When Clare Edwards is found dead in a ‘buttercup’ field, the gossips come out of the woodwork and rumours run rife. It’s all about keeping up appearances in this book. The Girl Next Door is a very good read, it’s full of twists and turns, a few red herrings and a surprise ending. There’s even a hint of creepiness. No-one is whom they seem and no-one can be trusted. The characters are mostly unlikeable but well drawn, so the reader can have a great love to hate relationship with them! It’s definitely a page turner and had me eagerly turning the pages, even though I had guessed who the killer was before the big reveal. Just don’t be lulled into a false sense of security! Captivating, enthralling and highly recommended - if you like a mystery with a bit of divergence, this is for you.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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