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Vanessa's 2015 Reads

What have you read in 2015? Post your list here and update it as you go along! (One thread per member, please.)
User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Vanessa's 2015 Reads

Post by Vanessa » Mon February 2nd, 2015, 11:00 am

Here's my list for January:

A Proper Family Christmas by Jane Gordon Cumming 5
A festive tale set in an old rambling house. The owner of Haseley House is a bit of a Scrooge where Christmas is concerned but when various members of his family come to help him celebrate, he has to adapt in his own way! But do their 'kind' hearts have an ulterior motive? I really enjoyed this book. It was a fun read. There are some great, zany characters including the cat, Scratach, my favourite. I enjoy stories set in houses and this one was just right for a Christmas setting. It had a 'spoof' like feel to it, a sort of 'Carry On Christmas' meets National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation.

We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler 5
A dysfunctional family saga with a difference! The story is told by Rosemary who has a sister called Fern who disappears one day. Fern is not the same as the rest of the family and just what happened to her? I really enjoyed this book and found it very thought provoking. It's not a plot driven story, more character based which I enjoy. I liked Rosemary's voice and found it an easy read, a bit of a page turner really. I thought it had something to say!

Bleeding Heart Square by Andrew Taylor 5
Set mostly in the 1930s, when the owner of Bleeding Heart Square disappears, a mystery surrounds her. A young woman who has left her abusive husband takes up residence with her father in the Square and becomes intrigued by this lady. I really enjoyed this book, it was a page turner. I found it gripping and atmospheric. I loved the style of writing and the way it was told. It kept me interested at all times.

Inceptio by Alison Morton 3.5
Set in an alternative world. Karen Brown escapes from New York after being hunted down by a government official for being a traitor. She flees to Roma Nova, a place founded by the Romans centuries ago and run by women. Unfortunately, she is still being followed and is in fear for her life. I enjoyed Inceptio pretty much, it was quite quirky. I was intrigued when I first started it, the middle part dragged a little for me and then the latter part picked up again. Nevertheless I found it quite fun and it was definitely different. It reminded me a little of the Thursday Next books in the way that it was written, a sort of jaunty theme to be taken with a pinch of salt.

The Raven's Head by Karen Maitland 5
Set in medieval England, when a young librarian by the name of Vincent discovers a secret which could have disastrous consequences for his master, he decides to try a spot of blackmail which unfortunately backfires. He finds himself in desperate peril and on the run with an ornate silver raven's head in his possession which seems to have a life of its own. After several endeavours to be rid of the bird, he eventually comes into contact with the alarming and intimidating Lord Sylvain who has an evil plot on his mind. This is a fast paced, captivating and atmospheric thriller which is thoroughly entertaining. It has a mysterious and gothic ambience and is decidedly eerie. In a nutshell, I loved it!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sun March 1st, 2015, 12:04 pm

Here's my list for February:

The Book of Lost and Found by Lucy Foley 5
When a young woman is bequeathed a portrait of her grandmother, she uncovers a whole can of worms. It takes her on a journey back to 1928and ending in 1986, taking in London, Paris, Corsica and New York, unravelling family secrets. I loved this book, thought it was beautifully written, a great story and an excellent debut.

The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer 3.5
This is an unusual time slip tale set in three eras, the 1980s, 1918 and 1945. When Greta loses her brother to AIDS, she finds her grief overwhelming and undergoes a new therapy which takes her literally back in time. I can't make up my mind whether it's a time travel or a parallel worlds story! In each era the characters are the same but with a slight twist in their circumstances. I enjoyed it but think the theme has been approached better by other authors.q

The Iron Necklace by Giles Waterfield 5
A beautifully written family drama set during World War I. It begins with the wedding of a young and wealthy English woman to a German architect in 1910. The story follows them through their lives and their respective families' lives as they learn to cope with the advent of the war and its aftermath. This is not a fast paced novel. It's a gentle, sympathetic, intuitive and absorbing tale about people and their foibles. It's about loyalty and patriotism, but most of all it's about family. I loved it!

The Lowland by Jjumpa Lahiri 3.5
This story begins in Calcutta and is about two brothers, one of whom finds himself involved in the Naxalite revolution. It follows their lives until one tragic day one brother gets killed and the other travels to America after marrying his brother's widow. Overall I enjoyed this book. I found the political parts a little boring and it was a while before I got into it. Ultimately, though, I found it quite absorbing and interesting.

Second Life by S J Watson 4
When a woman is found murdered in Paris, her sister who lives in London decides to investigate her deathbeda, leading her to online dating and a dangerous individual. This is a dark, sinister and quite seedy psychological thriller. I didn't enjoy it as much as Before I Go to Sleep but it's still a page turner.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

March

Post by Vanessa » Fri April 3rd, 2015, 10:10 am

Here's my list for March:

Time's Echo by Pamela Hartshorne 5
Dual timeframe story set in the 16thC and the 21stC (just after the Boxing Day tsunami) in York. When her godmother dies, Grace Trewe inherits her house. As she is sorting through her possessions, she receives messages across time from a young girl named Hawise who was drowned as a witch. Grace is drawn further and further into Hawise's and is obsessed with finding out the truth. I thoroughly enjoyed this tale. It's well researched and beautifully written. It reminded me a little of Barbara Erskine's work. If you enjoy timeslip stories, I can't recommend this highly enough.

Cavendon Hall by Barbara Taylor Bradford 3
This is a gentle family saga which encapsulates World War I and is set in Yorkshire. The aristocratic Inghams, otherwise known as the Earl and the Countess of Mowbray, live at Cavendon Hall. Their retainers, for want of a better word, the Swanns of Little Skell village, have sworn an oath to protect them since forever. It is a light-hearted, lively and easy read. I did find it a little repetitive and predictable at times. Nevertheless, it is an entertaining read, if a little bland. I read it for what it was - pure escapism!

I Do Not Sleep by Judy Finnigan 4.5
Five years after the death of her son in a boating accident in Cornwall, Molly Gabriel cannot get over her grief and is obsessed with finding out what exactly happened to him, especially as his body was never found. During a holiday back in Cornwall to try to come to terms with it all, she contacts her son's friend who was with him that fateful day to try to discover the truth. This is another book I really enjoyed this month. It's quite a sad and melancholy read, but it's atmospheric and there are some wonderful descriptions of Polperro! An absorbing tale.

The Silent Sister by Diane Chamberlain 4
Twenty years ago Lisa McPherson supposedly commits suicide when she is put on trial for murder. In the present day her sister, Riley, is sorting through their dead father's belongings and discovers evidence to say that Lisa may not be dead and is actually living under a secret identity. This leads her to investigate further and opens up a whole can of worms. I enjoyed this book. It had me turning the pages, although I did guess the twist!

I'm still reading Dacre's War by Rosemary Goring, only about 40 pages to go! My husband says I look like I'm reading an important government document due to its format! :D .
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

April

Post by Vanessa » Fri May 1st, 2015, 5:46 pm

[Here's my list for April:

Dacre's War by Rosemary Goring 5
A compelling and exciting story beginning in 1523, 10 years after the Battle of Flodden when life is still very fraught for the Borderers. Chief clansman Adam Crozier finds out that Baron Thomas Dacre, Lord Warden of the Marshes, ordered the murder of his father. Crozier wants his revenge and plots Dacre's downfall. This is a fascinating and imaginative piece of fiction, cleverly combining fact. It is well researched and beautifully written. An excellent and gripping sequel to 'After Flodden'.

Ember Island by Kimberley Freeman 4
Dual timeframe story set in the present day and the 1890s. In the present day Nina inherits a house on Ember Island, a place which used to used for convicts. When some letters are found within the walls, Nina realises they are penned by her great-grandmother relating to the tale of Tilly, her governess, who is hiding a big secret. Well written and an interesting story with plenty of twists and turns. I really enjoyed it.

The Kindness by Polly Samson 3
Reflective story about love, secrets and betrayal. Julian and Julia set up home together after finding out Julia is pregnant, then Julian finds out his childhood home is up for sale. They buy it and try to turn it into their family home. When their daughter becomes seriously ill, a secret emerges which changes everything. Beautifully written and very lyrical but a little too reflective and introspective for my tastes.

The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul by Deborah Rodriguez 3.5
Set in a cafe in Kabul, as per the title, centring around a group of women, three who work there - - Halajan who owns the building, Sunny who runs the cafe and Yazmina who works their whilst keeping a secret - and two who don't - Candace, an American, and Isabel who is British. It's a light hearted read with a few serious threads running through it. Enjoyable and educational at the same time.

The Lost Garden by Katharine Swartz 4
An evocative dual timeframe novel set in the Lake District. In the present day Marin Ellis becomes guardian to her half sister, Rebecca, when their father and his wife are killed in a car crash. They leave Hampshire to set up home in Cumbria as a fresh start. In 1919 the vicar's daughter, Eleanor Sanderson, is heartbroken over the death of her brother during the Great War. The restoration of a walled garden is the link which connects the two stories together. This is a gentle tale about grief, secrets, forgiveness and hope. I thoroughly enjoyed The Lost Garden and found it a touching, engaging and delightful read.

The Funeral Boat by Kate Ellis 3.5
The fourth in the Detective Wesley Peterson mysteries set in Devon. A Danish tourist goes missing, believed to be abducted, and a gang of thieves is on the loose robbing farms. Is there a connection between these activities and a Viking skeleton which has been unearthed at Longboat Cottage? Pleasant little mystery, an easy read.
Last edited by Vanessa on Sat May 2nd, 2015, 9:54 am, edited 3 times in total.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

May

Post by Vanessa » Mon June 1st, 2015, 5:59 pm

Here's my list for May:

The Song Collector by Natasha Solomons 4.5
An intriguing story about the power of music. Composer Harry 'Fox' Talbot is grieving over the death of his wife and finds he cannot write a note of music. He then discovers that his young grandson has the makings to be a brilliant pianist. As the music starts to take hold of Fox again, he looks back to 1946 when he returns to Hartgrove Hall after the war to find his home nearly in ruin and to an event which leads to a family rift. This poignant tale is also about betrayal and forgiveness. It touches on how music can bring back memories of a certain person, time or place and how it can heal. It's not fast paced, more of a 'slice of life' story but a thought provoking and engaging one at that. I found The Song Collector a compelling, absorbing and captivating read. I very much enjoyed it.

The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman 5
Set in New York in 1911, a young girl with webbed hands is brought up in the Museum of Extraordinary Things. Elsewhere a Jewish immigrant runs away from home and becomes a photographer. They come into contact with each other on the shores of the Hudson River and together they investigate the disappearance of a missing girl. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I loved the combination of fact and fiction. A fascinating and sometimes sad read.

The Paris Winter by Imogen Robertson 5
To escape her life in England, Maud Heighton travels to Paris to paint in Lafond's famous academy and to enjoy the Belle Epoch. To supplement her money, she becomes companion to Sylvie Morel who is addicted to opium. All is not as it seems and Maud soon becomes embroiled in a crime. I really enjoyed this book, I thought it was very atmospheric, especially as it was set during the horrific Paris floods of 1910.

The Looking Glass House by Vanessa Tait 3.5
An imaginative glimpse into a portion of time within Alice Liddell's life, the little girl who was the inspiration for Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and who also was the great-grandmother of the author, Vanessa Tait. The story is told in the third person mainly from the viewpoint of the governess, Mary Prickett. It is very cleverly and beautifully written, but also quite whimsical and surreal. It touches on the weird and wonderful topsy turvy world of Lewis Carroll (pseudonym for Charles Dodgson) and the writing harks back to him in a certain way. I found the tale engaging and interesting. I loved that it combined fact with fiction. I thought the author did a fantastic job of reading between the lines. An engaging and unusual read which I am sure will appeal to those who love fairy tales and all things magical!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

June

Post by Vanessa » Thu July 2nd, 2015, 10:29 am

Here's my list for June:

A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson 4.5
A companion book to Life After Life which is about Ursula Todd. Teddy Todd is Ursula's younger brother, an RAF bomber, and A God in Ruins is his story. The unusual aspect about it is that it is not told chronologically but jumps around in time, not just in alternating chapters but within chapters too! I really enjoyed it although not quite as much as Life After Life. It needs a little concentration otherwise it can be somewhat confusing!

The Palace of Curiosities by Rosie Garland 4
A story set in Victorian London about a lion faced girl called Eve and a flayed man called Abel, who both find themselves as exhibits at Professor Arroner's Palace of Curiosities. I rather enjoyed this book. I thought it was an odd and unusual read - very much an adult fairytale, more original Grimm than Disney!

Gold by Chris Cleave 3
Two women cyclists, who are friends as well as rivals, compete for a place at the London 2012 Olympics. This wasn't really my cup of tea. I found the cycling references a little endless and boring. I'm also not really keen on stories which feature children (or even adults for that matter!) with cancer, even as in this instance, they survive. Life can be stressful enough without reading about it.

The Dress by Kate Kerrigan 4
A dual timeframe story set mainly in London during the present day and in New York during the late 1950s, revolving around the designing, making and wearing of a magnificent dress, a dress which fairy tales and dreams are made of! After her grandfather dies, vintage fashion blogger Lily Fitzpatrick comes across an old photograph in 'Vogue' of a beautiful woman sharing the same surname as herself and sporting a glorious and bedazzling dress. Is she related to Lily and just what is the history behind 'the dress'? This is an intriguing tale with some interesting characters, not all of them likeable. It is nicely written with a good storyline. It's an easy and engaging read and I very much enjoyed it.

Wreckage by Emily Bleeker 3.5
When a plane crashes in the sea, there are three survivors and they spend the next two years as castaways on an island. As they are interviewed for a TV programme, will the truth be told? It's an easy, short read. I found it quite compelling to begin with and then it became less and less credible. I liked how the story was written, in flashback format. The idea was there and I think it is quite a good debut. The author could develop in subsequent books, I think.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

July

Post by Vanessa » Sat August 1st, 2015, 2:01 pm

Here's my list for July:

Skin by Ilka Tampke 5
A very imaginative and fascinating story set in Iron Age Britain just before the Roman invasion. It is told in the first person by Ailia, a young kitchen girl, who is left as a baby on the doorstep of the tribe queen of Caer Cad, one of the hill towns in Durotriga, now known as Somerset. She is brought up by the cookmother and is trained in the art of plantcraft. She yearns for 'skin', her totem or identity, without which she is not allowed to gain knowledge or marry, thus allowing her to be a journey woman. As Ailia grows up, she meets and falls in love with the mysterious Taliesin. She finds that she does, in fact, have certain powers and that she is destined to be a leader, the Kendra of her people. This is an absorbing and gripping tale about the mystical world of Druids, with their beliefs and rituals, and the coming of a new age. It's captivating and engrossing historical fiction with a hint of fantasy. It's beautifully written and vividly told. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The Kashmir Shawl by Rosie Thomas 5
A dual time frame story set in present day Wales and in India in the 1940s. When Mair Ellis is clearing out her father's house in Wales she comes across a beautiful shawl and a lock of a child's hair. She decides to travel to India to discover the history behind the shawl, which had belonged to her grandmother, Nerys Evans. She learns that her grandparents took a missionary posting in India in the 1940s and that Nerys moved to Srinagar, home to the British Raj, to live on a houseboat whilst her husband was away working. Mair sets off on a trail to unlock the secrets to her grandparents' past. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I thought it was a wonderful story and the descriptions of Kashmir and life at the time were so vivid.

Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes 3.5
The story of Charlie Gordon, a mentally retarded man who sweeps floors in a bakery for a living and who has an operation to make him more intelligent. He is the first human 'guinea pig' to have such an operation. Prior to this a mouse called Algernon has the same operation which was a success. However, it doesn't last and the mouse regresses and dies which means Charlie could face the same fate. This is a thought provoking little story. Although it isn't my genre at all, I did think it was a worthwhile read.

The Devil in the Marshalsea by Antonia Hodgson 5
Thriller set the notorious Marshalsea debtors' prison in the 18thC. Tom Hawkins, errant son of a parson, finds himself impoverished and in prison. An inmate has been murdered and Tom is sharing a cell with the prime suspect. It's a race against time to discover the true killer. I very much enjoyed this atmospheric book, full of interesting characters. I loved the quirky and humorous writing style. An entertaining read!

The Rose Garden by Susanna Kearsley 4
Timeslip story set in the present day and the 18thC. When her sister dies, Eva Ward journeys to Cornwall to scatter her ashes at the house where they used to spend some of their childhood. Eva discovers that she can time travel to the past and finds herself involved in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715 and smugglers. Although I found this an enjoyable tale and I loved the dual timeframe aspect of it, I did have to suspend belief quite a bit. The time travel is a little clunky! Nevertheless, it's an engaging story but not the author's best.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

August

Post by Vanessa » Tue September 1st, 2015, 2:42 pm

Here's my list for August:

The Silvered Heart by Katherine Clements 5
Set in the mid 1600s during the English Civil War, the story of a real life highwaywoman, Lady Katherine Ferrrars, who was also the inspiration for the film 'Wicked Lady'. She was an heiress who was forced into marriage to protect her family and as her money was withdrawn, she resorted to highway robbery. I loved it! I thought it was very imaginative retelling and would highly recommend it to those who enjoy historical fiction based on fact

The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith 4
The first in the Cormorant Strike detective series. A famous model apparently commits suicide by jumping to her death. Her brother is not so sure it wasn't murder so asks for Strike's help to uncover the truth. I enjoyed this. I'm not a big fan of thrillers and I would class this as a detective story rather than a thriller. I thought it was quite a clever little mystery with loads of twists and turns. It kept me reading on and I was quite gripped.

The Greatest Knight by Elizabeth Chadwick 5
The story of England's greatest knight, William Marshall. Set in the 11thC, it follows his journey from tutor to the sons of Henry VI and Eleanor of Aquitaine, to competing in tourneys (apparently he was the David Beckham of his day!), to becoming the young king's right-hand man. An unsung hero indeed. This is another fabulous and well written read.

The Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg 3
First in the Patrik Hedstrom detective series set in Sweden. A young woman is found dead with her wrists cut in a bath full of ice. An old friend who has recently returned to her childhood home decides to write a memoir about the dead girl and begins to help Patrik with his investigation. I enjoyed the mystery side to this book but the love interest side was a little too 'Bridget Jones' for me! I also didn't think the translation was the best example, I found it quite clumsy and childlike.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

September

Post by Vanessa » Thu October 1st, 2015, 6:30 pm

Here's my list for September:

Just One Damned Thing After Another by Jodi Taylor 4
First book in the St Mary Chronicles. Madeleine 'Max' Maxwell joins the Institute of Historical Research at St Mary's. This is a very different type of research and it involves time travel. In this one we go back to the dinosaur era and also visit the Alexandria Library and meet up with rogue time travellers. Enjoyable and fun read. Pure escapism.

Demelza by Winston Graham 5
Second book in the Poldark series set in Cornwall. Ross Poldark has now married Demelza Carne, a miner's daughter. Their marriage isn't an easy one and they have their fair share of problems to deal with like shipwrecks, and the odd but of manslaughter! I loved it and look forward to reading the next two books before Series Two begins on TV.

Amy Snow by Tracy Rees 4
Set in the mid 1800s, an abandoned baby is found in the snow by Aurelia Vennaway, daughter of a wealthy family. When Aurelia tragically dues at a very young age, she leaves Amy Snow a letter which leads her on a treasure hunt to discover Aurelia's secret. I thought it was a pleasant, intriguing and appealing debut by a promising new author. It did ramble a little at times but I think this was to give it a Victorian air.

Miss Garnet's Angel by Salley Vickers 3.5
When Harriet, Julia Garnet's flatmate, dies, Miss Garnet decides to go to Venice on a voyage of self discovery! She begins to become fascinated with the Angel Raphael and the ancient story of Tobias who travels to Medea. Miss Garnet's and Tobias' tales interlink, interweave and mirror each other. This is a beautifully written book but I found it a little tedious at times. I enjoyed the descriptions of Venice and there are some interesting characters, but I found Miss Garnet herself quite dreary! It does redeem itself at the end with a little twist in the tale!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4209
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

October

Post by Vanessa » Mon November 2nd, 2015, 10:11 am

Here's my list for October:

Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume 2
A 'road trip' style story about the relationship between Ray, a lonely man whose father has recently died, and One Eye, a stray dog who becomes his best friend. There is no plot as such, although there is a strange twist towards the end and what an ambiguous ending it is, too. I didn't know quite what to make of it! It's beautifully and eloquently written. It's a thought provoking tale, but somehow it didn't really engage me. I found it a little too dreary and sad for my tastes. The road trip seemed endless. I usually love stories which feature animals but this one just wasn't for me.

The Widow's Confession by Sophia Tobin 5
Set in the mid 1800s, two cousins travel to Broadstairs in Kent from America with a secret. Whilst enjoying the sea air and the peace and quiet, a young woman is found dead on the beach with a message scrawled in the sand. Further mysterious deaths occur. I really enjoyed this one, an intriguing mystery. It's very atmospheric and well written.

The Ghost of Mary Celeste by Valerie Martin 4
A story revolving around the mysterious disappearance of the passengers and crew of the Mary Celeste in 1872. I enjoyed this one, although it does jump around quite a bit. I loved that it weaved fact with fiction and mixed real life characters with fictional. And we still don't know what really happened to this ship but there are some interesting theories!

Mr Mercedes by Stephen King 4
A cat and mouse style thriller. Bill Hodges comes out of police retirement to try to stop a mass murderer killing again. He is assisted by some unlikely helpers, Jerome and Holly, and they make an interesting trio! I enjoyed it overall but did find it long winded. It is quite a page turner, though, with some shocks along the way Stephen King style! An entertaining read.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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