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Vanessa's 2014 Reads

What did you read in 2014? Post your list here and update it as you go along! (One thread per member, please.)
User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Vanessa's 2014 Reads

Postby Vanessa » Mon February 3rd, 2014, 10:43 am

Here's my list for January:

Rogue Herries by Hugh Walpole 5
Set in the Lake District in the 18thC, this is the first book in the Herries Chronicles in which we are told Francis Herries' story and that of his son, David, and daughter, Deborah. Francis leaves Doncaster to set up home in Borrowdale with his wife and children. When his wife dies, he meets gypsy girl Mirabell Starr which is the beginning of a long infatuation. It seemed to take me forever to read this book, although I really enjoyed it. There are some fantastic descriptions of the Lake District. It's very atmospheric and vivid. The characters are interesting and there is quite a story.

A Burnable Book by Bruce Holsinger 5
Combining fact with fiction, A Burnable Book is a well paced, absorbing and exciting historical thriller set in 14th century London about a treasonous book of prophecies and those who are desperate to get their hands on it. The story itself has many twists and turns and is cleverly plotted. It is also quite a rollercoaster of an adventure and although it's a little confusing at times, I just sat back and enjoyed the ride. There is a lot of attention to detail. It is well researched and London is vividly depicted. I almost felt I was there - it gave such a great sense of the time and place. I found it an evocatively written, gripping and thoroughly enjoyable read.

Burial Rites by Hannah Kent 4
Set in Iceland in the 19thC, this is based on a true story about the last woman to be executed there, Agnes Magnusdottir, who it is said murdered two men alongside two conspirators. It's an excellent book and very well researched. I can't say I enjoyed it as that's the wrong word. I found it quite harrowing and disturbing. Fascinating stuff, though, and some great descriptions of Iceland.

The Shadow Year by Hannah Richell 4.5
Dual timeframe story set in London and the Peak District. Five friends just leaving university decide to live the 'good' life in an isolated cottage by a lake, leading to tragic consequences, and a secret is kept. I very much enjoyed this book. I loved the descriptions of the countryside and the lake surrounding the cottage. I also loved the descriptions of the changing seasons - it helped with picturing what time of year it was in my mind. There were a few loopholes in the plot but all in all I thought it was a wonderful read.

Frederica by Georgette Heyer 4
Set in Regency London, the Marquis of Alverstoke becomes guardian to an old friend's children, two girls and three boys. The eldest girl, Frederica, enlists his help to find a suitable husband for the beautiful Charis. Confirmed bat belle and rake that he is, he then finds himself falling in love with Frederica. A light hearted and enjoyable romp.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

February

Postby Vanessa » Mon March 3rd, 2014, 12:53 pm

Here's my list for February:

The Madness by Alison Rattle 4
An interesting and sad tale about obsession set in Clevedon, a small seaside resort in Somerset. Marnie, a young local girl, meets Noah, the son of a prominent and prosperous business man, and finds herself feeling a dangerous attraction for him which leads to the madness of the title. found the Victorian setting and the historical information with regard to bathing huts and 'dippers' fascinating. The whole story was atmospherically and vividly told, so much so that I could picture it perfectly in my mind. An intriguing and thought provoking read which had me anxiously turning the pages!

Spare Change by Bette Lee Crosby 4
An enjoyable tale set in the American South told through first and third person points of view via various voices. When Olivia Boyle's husband Charlie dies during their honeymoon, she is visited by Charlie's grandson, Ethan Allen, who witnesses the deaths of both his parents. He is very reluctant to divulge exactly what happened back home but gradually the truth is revealed. I found the story fast paced and interesting - it certainly kept me turning the pages. It is quite humorous, but at the same time there is a serious thread running through it. The way it is told reminds me a little of Fannie Flagg's books. An easy, entertaining and heartwarming tale which I would recommend to those who enjoy slice-of-life stories containing a hint of mystery and a smattering of romance.

The Little Old Lady Who Broke All the Rules by Catharina Ingelberg Sundberg 3.5
Set in Sweden, a story about a group of elderly people who call themselves the League Of Pensioners, who decide enough is enough with regard to their treatment in a care home. They decide to commit a series of robberies so that they can spend time in prison as they have heard the conditions are better there than in their retirement home! I thought this was a humorous but silly book. The tale is quite a childish one but there were a few moments where I chuckled out loud. The translation is a little clunky. A bit of fun!

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. 5
Dystopian fiction set in a place called Panem which used to be the US. After a rebellion and defeat of a distric on the Capitol, the punishment is a televised game show where two young adults from each district are chose to participate. The rules the last one living wins! I found it a page turner and enjoyed it so much more than I expected to. It's a dark tale and had me gripped from the start. I look forward to reading the rest of the trilogy.

The Debt of Tamar by Nicole Dweck. 4
An absorbing and interesting historical saga which begins in the 16thC and finishes in the 20thC, although I would say the story does not end there! It follows the loves and lives of the Nissims, a Portuguese Jewish family, as they escape to Turkey to avoid persecution and also members of the Ottoman Dynasty. It's a tale of love, family secrets, which I very much enjoyed it. The writing is quite lyrical and the story is beautifully told. It never gets bogged down with too many details and it's an easy read. A compelling and captivating debut.

The Echoes of Love by Hannah Fielding 3
Set mainly in Venice and Tuscany, a sugary sweet bodice ripper! I was attracted by the cover of this book as Venice is my favourite city. I liked the style of writing - it was beautifully descriptive and the imagery was wonderful. However, I thought the plot was implausible and the love story was quite "Mills & Boon" in mode. There is a hint of intrigue but the end reveal I found unbelievable. It's a picturesque fairy tale which would appeal to readers who enjoy pure escapism.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

March

Postby Vanessa » Mon March 31st, 2014, 10:25 am

Here's my list for March:

Mortal Fire by C F Dunn 3.5
Cambridge history professor Emma D'Eresby takes a position at a university in Maine, where she is curious to research a 17thC journal, part of which was inherited by her grandfather. There she meets the enigmatic and puzzling Dr Matthew Lyons along with other mysterious characters, one of them quite sinister. Although not a lot happens, I found it strangely enjoyable. Some parts did drag a little but at the same time it is quite a dark and suspenseful story written in a gothic like style. I liked it enough to want to read the next in the trilogy, Death Be Not Proud. I'm sure vampires are involved!

The Four Streets by Nadine Dorries 4
A family saga set in Liverpool in the 1950s revolving around two girls. The author got her inspiration for this book from her own childhood. It's an easy read, a well written story with a great sense of community spirit. I thought it was a realistic and stirring tale which I very much enjoyed.

The Winter Folly by Lulu Taylor 3.5
Dual timeframe story set in the 1960s and the present day in Dorset. In the 1960s Alexandra Crewe has reluctantly married a man she didn't love as per her father's wishes, which ends in tragedy. In the present day Delilah Young marries John Stirling of Fort Stirling who seems very troubled. She decides to find out just what is troubling him, which connects to the story in the past. It's quite a sad story but I found it quite compelling with some grey areas!


Never Say Goodbye by Susan Lewis 5
A story of friendship between two very different women. Cleaner Josie Clarke has just had some devastating news, whilst Property Developer Bel Monkton is picking up the pieces of her family's life after the death of her sister. I had not realised that this story was about a terminal illness. I do not usually, knowingly, read books on this subject as I find them disturbing. However, this one is sensitively and humorously told. It's beautifully written with some great, well defined and believable characters. Even though there is a serious thread at its heart and it is sad at times, it is by no means a miserable tale. There are some amusing moments and I liked that the story was left on a positive note.

Star of the Sea by Joseph O'Connor 5
A sea faring tale set in 1847 during the famine in Ireland. A group of
travellers are sailing to America from Ireland in hope of a better life, among them a bankrupt lord, a maidservant, a journalist and a murderer. It's very much a character based story and is told in a Dickensian style, even mentioning the man himself a few times. I thought it was unusually and wonderfully written. I loved it.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

April

Postby Vanessa » Tue May 6th, 2014, 12:42 pm

Here's my list for April:

The Golden Tulip by Rosalind Laker 5
A family saga set in 18thC Amsterdam about art, tulips, espionage, love and politics. When Francesca obtains an apprenticeship with Johannes Vermeer, she is eager to take up the position only to find that her freedom has been curtailed by a rival for her love. It seemed to take me an age to read this book but I actually thoroughly enjoyed it. It's beautifully written and descriptively told. The historical side is fascinating and it's just an absorbing read.

Turning the Stones by Debra Daley 5
Set in the 18thC, the story is related via 'Em' to a mother who she does not remember. 'Em' is companion to the daughter of the Waterland family who find themselves in impoverished circumstances. She becomes aware that her beginnings are not as they were first told to her and decides to investigate the mystery of her birth. I found this an unusual and different story. The fabulous style of writing emulates the era in which it is set beautifully and the author has a fantastic command of the English language! It's very atmospherically told, too, and held my attention throughout.

The Chocolate Lovers' Club by Carole Matthews 3.5
A story about four women who regularly meet up in a cafe called Chocolate Heaven. They evolve into The Chocolate Lovers' Club and discuss their woes with each other. A bit of fluff and complete twaddle really, but I quite enjoyed it. Entertaining!

N or M? by Agatha Christie 4
A little different to Agatha Christie's usual mysteries. It's set during the war and involves espionage. Tommy and Tuppence get themselves embroiled in spies and Fifth Column Nazis. Lots of twists, turns and red herrings. An enjoyable tale.

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom 4.5
Set in the 18thC in Virginia on a tobacco plantation. An orphaned white girl is placed in the 'kitchen house' to live alongside the black slaves, including the master's illegitimate daughter. As she is white, she is set apart from them although she feels part of their family. When she is 17 she is sent to stay with her guardian's family in Boston where they hope she will marry well. This is not to be! I very much enjoyed this book. It was an easy, interesting and captivating read and gave a good insight into the times without being too detailed. A great debut!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

May

Postby Vanessa » Mon June 2nd, 2014, 10:37 am

Here's my list for May - not a good month reading wise for me, only three!

The Question by Cynthia Harrod Eagles 5
Book 25 in the Morland Dynasty. It's been a while since I read a book in this series, so I thought it was time I caught up with the Morlands to see how they're all doing!! :) . This one covers the latter years of the 19thC and the early part of the 20thC. There is devastation caused by the Boer War and then as the years go by, the country is grieving when Queen Victoria dies. In the meantime, Morland Place is being modernised and renovated. Flushing toilets no less! :) Love this saga! Ten more to go!!

The Casual Vacancy by J K Rowling. 4.5
Set in contemporary Britain in fictional Pagford. When a councillor dies, it leaves a vacant seat which leads to an election for a new one and what a war this is! There are some totally despicable characters and it's all about small town politics. Harry Potter it isn't! You will be sadly disappointed if you expected anything like HP. However, I found it fascinating stuff. The characterisation is wonderful, it's well written and the observations are, oh, so true! Sadly there are people like those in the book. It's not a cheerful read and it took some getting through, but there is some humour which made me snort.

Thornyhold by Mary Stewart. 4
I had to read something a little more pleasant after The Casual Vacancy and Thornyhold fitted the bill. A young woman inherits a house which has a history of witchcraft. There are some eerie goings on and a pinch of romance. It's a nice, gentle read. I like the author's style of writing - Mary Stewart died recently so I though it would be a good tribute to read one of her books.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

June

Postby Vanessa » Tue July 1st, 2014, 9:13 am

Here's my list for June:

The Garden of Burning Sand by Corban Addison 4
Set during the 1980s in Zambia. A young girl is sexually assaulted but as she cannot speak, her identity and that of her attacker are a mystery. A human rights activist lawyer investigates the crime alongside a Zambian policeman. I thought this was an interesting and absorbing read, although I did find it quite political. Well worth the read.

The Railway Man's Wife by Ashley Hay 3.5
Set just after WWII in New South Wales, this tells a story of three connected people, two of whom have just return from the war and one who has just suffered a tragedy. This is a beautifully written book. There are some wonderful descriptions and imagery - it's very visual. It deals with the trauma of the loss of a loved one and the grief that follows extremely well. It's a tale which most people can relate to. However, it is quite a gloomy tale and one which didn't grab me straight away. Gradually I did find it compelling and thought provoking.

I Think I Love You by Allison Pearson 3
Set during the 1970s and 1990s. The first half of the book concerns two young girls entering a competition and the mass hysteria surrounding pop teen idol David Cassidy. The second half is set 20+ years later when the same two girls are now in their late 30s and find out that they did, in fact, win the competition to meet their hero. Although I found the first half of the story interesting as it brought back memories, I much preferred the second half. To enjoy this book in any way, I think you would have to be a big fan of the man himself (as, admittedly, I was!).

Divergent by Veronica Roth 4
A dystopian story set in world divided into factions, Dauntless, Abnegation, Candor, Erudite and Amity. Or if you are unlucky you end up Factionless! At the age of 16 each person has to choose which faction they want to belong to and then they have to through the initiation process . Beatrice or 'Tris' chooses Dauntless in the hopes of becoming Tris the Brave. I thought this was an enjoyable and imaginative tale, but I can't help feeling the author got her inspiration from The Hunger Games!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

July

Postby Vanessa » Sat August 2nd, 2014, 9:59 am

Here's my list for July.

The Sunrise by Victoria Hislop 4
An interesting and captivating story set during the 1970s on the island of Cyprus in the holiday resort of Famagusta. Underneath the sunshine and glamour, political disturbances brew and a military coup occurs, resulting in an invasion by the Turkish army. The luxury Hotel Sunrise is at the centre of all the bloodshed and horror and two families find themselves in hiding, secretly trying to exist. This is an enjoyable, fascinating and compelling story about families, friendship, loyalty and betrayal. It gives a good insight into the terrible events which happened in Cyprus at that particular time.

The Blood Dimmed Tide by Anthony Quinn 4
I thought this was an unusual book, dealing with the occult. Each chapter begins with a tarot card and the story starts in 1918 in London, two years after the Easter Rising in Ireland. When a young woman's body is found floating in the sea in a coffin just off the coast of Sligo, poet W B Yeats and his apprentice ghost catcher decide to use their skills to identify the killer. It's part espionage thriller, part ghost story and part historical novel. It took a little while for the tale to grab me, but once it did, I found it fascinating and absorbing. It's quite gripping in its way and I thought the historical aspect interesting. If you can suspend disbelief, this is an imaginative and entertaining thriller with a supernatural element and a smattering of fairy dust!

Wolf by Mo Hayder 3.5
Fifteen years ago a double murder is committed in some woods behind an isolated house. When the family who lived there at the time return to it, strange things start to happen and they end up hostages in their own home. I can't say too much without giving spoilers, but I didn't like how it ended. I enjoyed it but I thought it wasn't very credible at times. It was quite disturbing, too, and it definitely had a certain amount of suspense. I've requested Birdman, the first in the series, from the library.

The Things We Never Said by Susan Elliot Wright 4.5
Set in the 1960s and the present day, two inter-connecting stories about a young woman in a psychiatric hospital who is trying to remember her previous life and a young man who is having problems of his own when a detective turns up on his doorstep asking questions about his father. I very much enjoyed this book - I thought it gave a good insight into mental institutions of the 50s and 60s. It reminded me a little of a The a Vanishing of Esme Lennox and The Bell Jar. I look forward to reading more by this author.

An Unhallowed Grave by Kate Ellis 4
The third in the Wesley Peterson murder mystery series set in Devon. A woman is found hanged from a yew tree in a church yard, which has a connection to the hanging of another woman 600 years ago. All clues point to murder. Enjoyable and entertaining read.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

October

Postby Vanessa » Mon November 3rd, 2014, 10:32 am

Here's my list for October:

Honeyville by Daisy Waugh 4
An imaginative and engaging story surrounding the 1913 Ludlow Massacre in Trinidad, Colorado. At the heart of the tale is a prostitute, Dora Whitworth, through whose eyes 'Honeyville' is told. After a murder is committed, she befriends the wealthy Inez and her brother, Xavier, and finds herself embroiled in the ins and outs of the town's unions and miners' strikes. A gripping, absorbing and compelling insight into an awful episode in Trinidad's history.

Dark Matter by Michelle Paver 5
A ghost story set in the Arctic set in 1937. A group of men go on an expedition, including Jack who has a chip on his shoulder. One by one, the men have to abandon the trip, leaving Jack alone. He starts to experience visions and a sense of unease. I really enjoyed this book. It's atmospheric and creepy. It's more psychological than gory, which I prefer. Highly recommended!

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline 4
Dual timeframe story set in the present day and in the 1930s/40s. Molly, who has been fostered most of her life and is a bit of a rebel, finds herself helping to clear out an elderly lady's attic. As Molly sorts through Vivian's memorabilia, she learns that Vivian, as a child, was put on an orphan train to be adopted and Molly becomes absorbed into delving further into what happened to her. I really enjoyed this story, although it did seem a little disjointed and rushed. I've never heard of orphan trains so it was interesting to read about a piece of history I knew nothing about. An easy read.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

November

Postby Vanessa » Fri December 5th, 2014, 10:21 am

Here's my list for November. I don't seem to have as much reading time these days due to babysitting duties! My daughter's keeps me very occupied, she likes my full attention.

Lighthouse Bay by Kimberley Freeman 4
A dual timeframe novel set in the present day and 1901. In 1901, when a ship sinks off the coast of Lighthouse Bay in Australia, there is only one survivor and this is Isabella who has in her possession a valuable object meant as a gift for the Austalian government. In the present day, Libby Slater moves from Paris to Lighthouse Bay to recover from the death of her lover. Their worlds collide. I enjoyed this book. Some of it did seem a bit convenient and unlikely but it was a nice, pleasant and gentle read.

The Jewel of St Petesburg by Kate Furnivall 4.5
The first in the Russian Concubine trilogy set in 1910. As the Bolsheviks start to rampage over Russia and a rebellion is in sight, pianist Valentina Ivanova starts a love affair with a Danish engineer, Jens Friis, in opposition to her father's wishes. I very much enjoyed this book, it's an interesting setting. I will be reading the rest of the series.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall & The Corset by Laura Purcell (Pigeonhole)
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

December

Postby Vanessa » Fri January 2nd, 2015, 2:56 pm

Here's my list for December:

The Ice Twins by S K Tremayne 5
An absorbing and gripping psychological thriller which explores the monozygotic twins scenario and investigates the question of how well parents know their own children. After the tragic death of Lydia, one of their daughters, Angus and Sarah Moorcroft move to an inherited island just off the Isle of Skye, along with surviving twin, Kirstie, to try to come to terms with their grief. When Kirstie starts to insist she is Lydia, events take a disturbing and sinister turn for the worse. So, what really happened on the world-shattering and disastrous day of Lydia's death? I found this a very enjoyable, atmospheric and tense tale. It held my attention throughout and I was eager to turn the pages - I literally could not put it down!

The Girl in the Photograph by Kate Riordan 5
Alice Eveleigh has been sent to Fiercombe Manor in rural Gloucesteshire after she becomes pregnant by a married man, to await the birth and avoid a scandal. There she discovers letters and a diary belonging to the lady of the manor, Elizabeth Stanton, who lived on the estate 40 years previously. As Alice digs deeper into the mystery of Elizabeth's life, she uncovers a sad secret. The two stories are linked by the enigmatic Edith Jelphs, an old friend of Alice's mother, who was once maid to Elizabeth and who is now the housekeeper. Just what is she hiding? This is an absorbing and atmospheric tale, very much a page turner for me. It is beautifully, lyrically and expressively written. A thoroughly enjoyable and gripping read.

Starry Night by Debbie Macomber 3
Society columnist Carrie Slayton longs for her writing to be taken seriously and she is given the chance by way of a challenge - to interview the elusive Finn Dalton, bestselling author of his memoirs about living in the wilds of Alaska. So, Carrie flies out to Alaska to find him and their eyes meet under a starry night and the rest, as they say, is history. I quite enjoyed the first half of the book as most of it was set in snowy Alaska but the second half just got too soppy. A lacklustre story.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind


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