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Harold Lamb

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Ludmilla
Bibliophile
Location: Georgia USA

Postby Ludmilla » Wed December 3rd, 2008, 8:13 pm

There are summariesof the Cossack Adventures at Google Book Search.

I also like going to Fantastic Fiction for author bibliographies. The entry for Harold Lamb is here. If you click on the titles, there's a one to two sentence summary for some of them. Oddly enough, I don't see the Cossack Adventures in his bibliography. Looks like it might leave out stories he wrote for Adventure magazine that were later consolidated.

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Volgadon
Compulsive Reader
Location: Israel
Contact:

Postby Volgadon » Wed December 3rd, 2008, 8:34 pm

I've mostly got his NF.

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Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Wed December 3rd, 2008, 9:16 pm

thanks annis, thats pretty much what i was looking for.

and thanks ludmilla. i noticed the same thing about his profile there as well. no summeries of cossak tales. just crusader and NF. strange.

gyrehead
Reader

Postby gyrehead » Fri January 23rd, 2009, 2:32 am

I got the four volumes of the Cossack tales in the University of Nebraska reprints when they came out. Nice solid trade paperbacks. Not sure of their availability in Europe.

In case you are still interested, the collection ranges from adventures on the steppes down into Persia, the Turkish highlands and on into India during the Moghuls. Plus adventures into the Gobi and other ancillary areas. They are quite good and lots of fun. I will warn you though that Lamb was definitely a man of his times. And his perceptions of both race and gender are very dated and very closeminded and bigoted for this day and age. On the other hand, I get a sense that Lamb was someone who appreciate the exotic cultures he was writing about in a way that perhaps was not the norm for that time period in the U.S.

I also have hidden away somewhere a tattered copy of his Crusades duology that I simply devoured as a kid. I'm really hoping that Bison Press (U. of Neb. press imprint) picks back up in re-issuing his works as I would love to stock up on some affordable copies that don't threaten to fall apart or turn to dust if sunlight hits them.

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Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Fri January 23rd, 2009, 9:17 pm

"gyrehead" wrote:I got the four volumes of the Cossack tales in the University of Nebraska reprints when they came out. Nice solid trade paperbacks. Not sure of their availability in Europe.

In case you are still interested, the collection ranges from adventures on the steppes down into Persia, the Turkish highlands and on into India during the Moghuls. Plus adventures into the Gobi and other ancillary areas. They are quite good and lots of fun. I will warn you though that Lamb was definitely a man of his times. And his perceptions of both race and gender are very dated and very closeminded and bigoted for this day and age. On the other hand, I get a sense that Lamb was someone who appreciate the exotic cultures he was writing about in a way that perhaps was not the norm for that time period in the U.S.

I also have hidden away somewhere a tattered copy of his Crusades duology that I simply devoured as a kid. I'm really hoping that Bison Press (U. of Neb. press imprint) picks back up in re-issuing his works as I would love to stock up on some affordable copies that don't threaten to fall apart or turn to dust if sunlight hits them.


thnx.

i found those cossak volumes on abe books and am just waiting till xmas is far enoughb behind us that ill feel less guilty about a capital outlay. do the books need to be read in any particular order or can i dive in with vol 3, for instance?

as for the attitudes, hey ill take a little authentic bigotry over the PC nonsense in most modern books. i read Fu manchu a bit ago and it was interesting to see how many "evil yellow men" references Rohmer could squeeze into one book. not that i endorse it, but its a nice authentic "snapshot" of an authors feelings at a time in history. the simple fact that he was writing about different cultures in a non-stereotyped manner puts him ahead of his times (im assuming)

and im waiting for his crusade tales to be reissued right along with you :-)

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Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Sun June 28th, 2009, 8:42 pm

just found this

http://www.amazon.com/Swords-West-Harold-Lamb/dp/0803220359

with as much as im enjoying lambs cossak tales, this looks great. harold lamb, crusades, looks like more fun than you should be allowed to have with a book.

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sun June 28th, 2009, 9:05 pm

Thanks for the heads up, Keny. Great to see some Harold Lamb being reissued. I see that there is a companion volume coming out as well, called "Swords of the Desert"

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Kveto from Prague
Compulsive Reader
Location: Prague, Bohemia

Postby Kveto from Prague » Sun June 28th, 2009, 9:18 pm

here are the Lamb books in the works for the next two years

Swords from the West (2009)(Forthcoming)
Swords from the Desert (2009)(Forthcoming)
Swords from the East (2010)(Forthcoming)
Swords from the Sea (2010)(Forthcoming)

I just love that Lamb is getting the attention he deserves. the old harold lamb site the curved sabre seems to be up and running.

http://www.haroldlamb.com/fiction.htm

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Sun June 28th, 2009, 9:43 pm

Cool! So good to see the Curved Sabre website is available again - it seemed to be out of action for ages, and I thought it might have died as websites sometimes do - usually the ones that are on your favourites list :(

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Volgadon
Compulsive Reader
Location: Israel
Contact:

Postby Volgadon » Mon June 29th, 2009, 10:32 am

"keny from prague" wrote:thnx.

i found those cossak volumes on abe books and am just waiting till xmas is far enoughb behind us that ill feel less guilty about a capital outlay. do the books need to be read in any particular order or can i dive in with vol 3, for instance?

as for the attitudes, hey ill take a little authentic bigotry over the PC nonsense in most modern books. i read Fu manchu a bit ago and it was interesting to see how many "evil yellow men" references Rohmer could squeeze into one book. not that i endorse it, but its a nice authentic "snapshot" of an authors feelings at a time in history. the simple fact that he was writing about different cultures in a non-stereotyped manner puts him ahead of his times (im assuming)

and im waiting for his crusade tales to be reissued right along with you :-)


And despite all those yellow peril references, Fu Manchu is still a cracking read.

Harold Lamb's Cossack tales are a very fun read.


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